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    (Original post by ukebert)
    Dear me, I would never do anything like that :p: I swear some of the dirty cups had been in my gyp for most of term. Most bizarre thing was a half empty bottle of wine with a spoon stuck in the top that was put in the fridge in fresher's week and never taken out...
    Same; there was still nearly a windowsill's worth of crockery lying around the kitchen a week after the end of term...
    Call me naive, but I had expected university students to be more careful with their things/more respectful of communial living space *shrug*
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    Surely you've met some economics people?
    There aren't many Economics people on here, and I don't think I've met any of them, no.
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    There aren't many Economics people on here, and I don't think I've met any of them, no.
    Next meet, you will come. No excuses.
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    Just a quick hello again, I'm still ill, hope everyone's ok.
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    Gowny link
    Ooooh, how interesting I just found this:

    Strictly, Christ's could be included in 'sleeve decoration' in addition, but is placed here for easy comparison with Emmanuel. Both colleges' gowns include box pleating, which is found useful by many undergraduates for the temporary concealment of pennies.
    That's the best bit about our gowns! Penny pockets! Except not so great when you smoothly grab a penny out of your penny pocket and drop it into someone's glass in one swift motion, only to discover that it was actually a 5p you dropped and you now have to suffer downing your Sainsbury's basics white

    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Usually only about one plate with crumbs on it a day. Its silly to leave it there when I'm doing mine - she wouldn't move it, and messy kitchens annoy me.
    On my floor we all do each other's washing up, probably because four of the five of us have become really close and we know that if someone's stuff is in the gyp room but isn't washed up, chances are they're having some kind of essay crisis/don't have time because of other things keeping them busy, and we all just help each other out. It seems silly if someone else's washing up is there and you have time on your hands to just do your own and leave theirs, but then I guess if I wasn't such good friends with them I might not bot bother.
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    Next meet, you will come. No excuses.
    We'll see.

    (Original post by Nina)
    Just a quick hello again, I'm still ill, hope everyone's ok.
    Hi. Hope you get better soon. :console:

    (Original post by Zoedotdot)
    That's the best bit about our gowns! Penny pockets! Except not so great when you smoothly grab a penny out of your penny pocket and drop it into someone's glass in one swift motion, only to discover that it was actually a 5p you dropped and you now have to suffer downing your Sainsbury's basics white
    When it comes to cheap wine, I've found that it's actually more pleasant to down it than to drink it properly. :p:
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    When it comes to cheap wine, I've found that it's actually more pleasant to down it than to drink it properly. :p:
    Neither is ideal :p: I've consumed such vast quantities of the stuff this term that I'm amazed I'm still intact. I find it very very unpleasant to down because you get a horrible sicky burn at the back of your mouth, but I don't think downing any wine is especially great. And it does get it over with quickly :rolleyes:
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    The first one to penny me will get my water chucked in their face :dry:
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    (Original post by Zoedotdot)
    Neither is ideal :p: I've consumed such vast quantities of the stuff this term that I'm amazed I'm still intact. I find it very very unpleasant to down because you get a horrible sicky burn at the back of your mouth, but I don't think downing any wine is especially great. And it does get it over with quickly :rolleyes:
    I get that sickly feeling at the back of my mouth when not downing it. :yep:

    (Original post by ukebert)
    The first one to penny me will get my water chucked in their face :dry:
    That sounds like fun.
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    Dear me, I would never do anything like that :p: I swear some of the dirty cups had been in my gyp for most of term. Most bizarre thing was a half empty bottle of wine with a spoon stuck in the top that was put in the fridge in fresher's week and never taken out...
    Yeh... the irritation that would cause is far greater than the mild impracticality of washing one or two more things alongside my own.
    This is why I prefer college accommodation to living arrangements elsewhere. Halls in some places are about 12 to a kitchen, and then in second and third year, if you're stuck in a house with two or three messy people, you're screwed.
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    (Original post by K.T.)

    Call me naive, but I had expected university students to be more careful with their things/more respectful of communial living space *shrug*
    Not in England.
    (Original post by Zoedotdot)
    It seems silly if someone else's washing up is there and you have time on your hands to just do your own and leave theirs, but then I guess if I wasn't such good friends with them I might not bot bother.
    I agree. If it was a huge, awful mess I wouldn't do it. I'd knock on the person's room and ask them to come and sort it out. Especially if there wasn't any clean or clear workspace for me to use when I needed to. Usually its not too much trouble to do it myself. And its only one girl who leaves her stuff and never talks to us. The other housemate using my kitchen is really lovely and returns the favour when he washes stuff up.
    (Original post by ukebert)
    The first one to penny me will get my water chucked in their face :dry:
    My usual response is to fish out the penny, plunk it into the owner's glass and tell them that the Queen can drown. I once gave my wine glass to a passing servant/waiter.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Not in England.

    I agree. If it was a huge, awful mess I wouldn't do it. I'd knock on the person's room and ask them to come and sort it out. Especially if there wasn't any clean or clear workspace for me to use when I needed to. Usually its not too much trouble to do it myself. And its only one girl who leaves her stuff and never talks to us. The other housemate using my kitchen is really lovely and returns the favour when he washes stuff up.
    My usual response is to fish out the penny, plunk it into the owner's glass and tell them that the Queen can drown. I once gave my wine glass to a passing servant/waiter.
    To sum up: England sucks and the Queen can die. :p:
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    (Original post by Thicky)
    To sum up: England sucks and the Queen can die. :p:
    Well, she's going to die anyway at some point :p:
    And no, England doesn't suck, but I won't pretend to appreciate all of its peculiarities.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Well, she's going to die anyway at some point :p:
    And no, England doesn't suck, but I won't pretend to appreciate all of its peculiarities.
    True, although I do appreciate more than most :p:

    Yeah, a lot of the fuss over the Royal Family is completely comprehensible, including the Royal Toast.
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    True, although I do appreciate more than most :p:
    I don't think you do. You enjoy 'tradition' in the mostly artificial sense, which is foreign to the everyday lives of the ordinary english inhabitant. By mentioning peculiarities, I was referring to trends in behaviour and lifestyle that are specific to contemporary English residents.
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    I wouldn't say not doing the washing up and being rude is an English thing...
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    I don't think you do. You enjoy 'tradition' in the mostly artificial sense, which is foreign to the everyday lives of the ordinary english inhabitant. By mentioning peculiarities, I was referring to trends in behaviour and lifestyle that are specific to contemporary English residents.
    Ah I see. Well, I enjoy the peculiarities inasmuch as they give me something to moan about.

    And Tradition is not always artificial :hmmm:
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    (Original post by Apagg)
    I wouldn't say not doing the washing up and being rude is an English thing...
    I've lived with about fifteen different families in England, and stayed with several more. I've also stayed with families in very many other countries, and lived in another for most of my life. English are dirtier. Additionally many foreigners and international students I've met in this country have remarked on the same thing.

    Hardly empirical research, but its difficult not to get that impression. Also when I worked as a seasonnaire in the French Alps, cleaning out chalets, my employers told me that of all the many nationalities that gave them custom, the English clients always left their chalets in the worst state.

    Also when some of our friends visited South Africa they were shocked by the standards of our hotels and B&Bs in comparison to those in England. According to them, accommodation in the UK is generally grubbier.
    Some South African friends who immigrated here never go out to eat, because they have mostly been put off by the dirtiness of pubs and restaurants here.


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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    I agree. If it was a huge, awful mess I wouldn't do it. I'd knock on the person's room and ask them to come and sort it out. Especially if there wasn't any clean or clear workspace for me to use when I needed to. Usually its not too much trouble to do it myself. And its only one girl who leaves her stuff and never talks to us. The other housemate using my kitchen is really lovely and returns the favour when he washes stuff up.

    My usual response is to fish out the penny, plunk it into the owner's glass and tell them that the Queen can drown. I once gave my wine glass to a passing servant/waiter.
    The only person's washing up I don't do belongs to the girl who lives opposite me. She rarely leaves her room except to clog up the gyp room and sink with huge quantities of washing up that she then leaves there for days, meaning that on the rare occasions I actually fancy doing washing up (usually essay days or after midnight when I'm feeling wakeful but nothing else is going on) it's either the sink is full of her stuff that she's left to soak but hasn't actually washed, or the very very small counter is covered in it so I have nowhere to put anything after it's washed. Wouldn't do any harm to put these things in cupboards! So for the irritation, I'll rarely do hers, although if it's only a couple of mugs or something I tend to chuck it in anyway.

    With pennying, if I don't fancy downing something I just ignore the penny, no fuss made. People tend to get the picture, and I never penny if I don't want to be pennied.
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    (Original post by Zoedotdot)
    Craggy - I unfortunately hate salmon, so not good for me. We always have salmon at some point in the meal - last time it was some kind of weird salmon mush for the starter. But yes, that does sound similar. We have two of the big platters per table, but they're too big/hot to pass round so one person normally serves.
    I love salmon, but they've only served it twice at Selwyn; once roasted, at a formal (but I was too drunk by the time it was served to enjoy it :shifty:) and once, breaded, at Hall. That one was nice.

    (Original post by Zoedotdot)
    you now have to suffer downing your Sainsbury's basics white
    :eek: You can take outside wine in? We're allowed a bottle each too, but it has to be Selwyn College wine with a special Selwyn sticker on it to show you've bought it that day, specially for formal. It's alright, because the wine is cheap (£4.20 a bottle is the cheapest) but it tastes disgusting.

    With pennying, if I don't fancy downing something I just ignore the penny, no fuss made. People tend to get the picture, and I never penny if I don't want to be pennied.
    At Selwyn, we put our glasses upside down if we don't want to be pennied. This is normally ignored though ;
 
 
 
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