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Degree that combines math and art

I really like physics math also art. Which degree is suitable for me? I know this a dumb question and I can probably just google it but I wanted know from everyones first hand experience. Also degree that can provide a respectable job
Original post by brightestgeek
I really like physics math also art. Which degree is suitable for me? I know this a dumb question and I can probably just google it but I wanted know from everyones first hand experience. Also degree that can provide a respectable job

Hey @brightestgeek

There's quite a few degrees that could incorporate what you enjoy so it's good to think of a few jobs or industries you think you might like to do in the future, and what their requirements would be and what sort of degrees they prefer to hire from.

Some suggestions from me would be degrees in the field of computer design and engineering, graphics, robotics, video game design. A lot of the sciences do like you to have a strong background in maths. you can for example do mathematics with physics at Essex https://www.essex.ac.uk/courses/ug00285/1/bsc-mathematics-with-physics?startdate=2023/24 and you would have many options open to you in different career paths when you graduate.

To encompass maths, physics and art as well there is of course Architecture which many universities offer but unfortunately not at Essex yet. It can be quite a lengthy process to become a qualified architect, usually with 5 years of study and 2 years of practical experience. Just like with medicine it's a big commitment of a degree and one I'd recommend if you're sure that's the career you wish to pursue
https://www.architecture.com/education-cpd-and-careers/how-to-become-an-architect

Think about the many clubs and societies that are open to join at university as well, so as you like art there would probably be an art society at your university and it can be a hobby that you pursue alongside your studies and a great way to make friends.

There are thousands of degree options to choose from across the UK so definitely do some research before you start applying :smile:

Best of luck!
Essex Student Rep - Hayley
(edited 1 year ago)
I mean it depends on what exact aspects and to what extent you would want/expect the subjects to be represented. A lot of courses will involve superficial amounts of one and a lot of the other, but there aren't as many that incorporate both in a non-trivial way.

For example, architecture is primarily a design subject and involves a lot of creative design processes and thus is often quite "art-y". There is also usually some maths in the course, but this is typically GCSE standard at most. On the other side of the coin, engineering (particularly mechanical engineering or design/product engineering) might involve some aspects involving aesthetic design but these are usually secondary to the engineering design (which is not a creative design process but an analytical process) involving a lot of maths well beyond A-level.

Your best bet for involving both to non-trivial levels would be design fields with more technical aspects, such as games development/design/programming or product design/engineering. Alternately you may want to explore one side or the other as your formal degree programme while developing your interests in the other side outside of the formal curriculum.
Original post by brightestgeek
I really like physics math also art. Which degree is suitable for me? I know this a dumb question and I can probably just google it but I wanted know from everyones first hand experience. Also degree that can provide a respectable job

Theres a UCL degree thats like Arts and Sciences you could look into :smile:
Original post by brightestgeek
I really like physics math also art. Which degree is suitable for me? I know this a dumb question and I can probably just google it but I wanted know from everyones first hand experience. Also degree that can provide a respectable job


Hi! During my A-levels I felt a similar way - I had studied what would be perceived as very different subject choices because I had an interest in them, but when it came to applying to university, I didn't know what degree, if any, was suitable.
At the time of applying, I wasn't aware about degrees that allowed you to study multiple subjects and didn't know how to begin researching for those that would offer me the chance to maintain a variety or study or continue with my different interests.
Luckily, I found out about the degree I am on now.

I am now on a BASc degree (arts and sciences) in Interdisciplinary Problems and Methods (https://www.lis.ac.uk/about/). This degree is composed of disciplines (subjects) and methods, and as students we can pick which ones we want to focus on each term:

Disciplines:
We learn perspectives from multiple different subjects in each term. So far, those in my cohort have looked at economics, neuroscience, datascience, philosophy, ecology, mathematics, political/legal theory, technology and culture studies, and others in just the last two years.
We have a few weeks for each, learning about the various views, approaches, uses, benefits, and biases within the subjects.

Methods:
The method modules are a way to build skills that can be applied both in the degree, and afterwards. So far, across the cohort we have covered visual methods, materials and making, social science research, natural language processing, thinking through writing, investigating the physical world, probability and statistics, and a few others.

My course-mates and I study this at the London Interdisciplinary School in Whitechapel London. The campus is filled with students from a variety a backgrounds (from past degrees, A-levels, or work) and subject interests - some have a passion for science, others for art, people, or agriculture, but most importantly, we all have a passion for going beyond the box these subjects are often confined to.
An important part of the degree is integrating the insights from these different subjects, which is what the 'interdisciplinary' element is for, and we can do this by utilising the methods we learn. We not only get to learn about multiple different subjects, but how you can combine them e.g. to research a problem or to approach one.
We have often had speakers come to the campus to talk about these different subjects - from art-based fields to economics or STEM - and how combining perspectives and insight is important for the "real-world" problems being tackled by so many different types of jobs, showing how they have done this in their careers.

Learning in this interdisciplinary way on my degree has not only enabled me to continue studying a variety of subjects, unlike a lot of the other degrees I came across, but changed my perspective when looking at the world and how much it is needed for change to be made. And building these skills is an engaging way of applying this various subject knowledge to problems we have a passion for trying to improve. Hope this helps :smile:
Original post by brightestgeek
I really like physics math also art. Which degree is suitable for me? I know this a dumb question and I can probably just google it but I wanted know from everyones first hand experience. Also degree that can provide a respectable job

if you want a more straightforward/linear degree that leads to a career i would suggest architecture - i also loved stem and art but never really considered architecture until i was choosing gcses but its perfect for me and i will be starting this september so if you have any questions ill try to help
Original post by brightestgeek
I really like physics math also art. Which degree is suitable for me? I know this a dumb question and I can probably just google it but I wanted know from everyones first hand experience. Also degree that can provide a respectable job

Hey there @brightestgeek !
There's plenty of options out there for you to have a look at that incorporates all of those things. For example, you could find an overall degree that interests you where it also includes different modules of what you enjoy. When choosing my degree, I enjoy the digital marketing side of the media but I also have a keen interest in photography so I kept looking until I found a media degree that had some form of digital marketing and a photography module as well.

In your case, if you enjoy art and physics then there's a lot of diagram drawing and creating displays in a physics degree that encompasses both of those interests, not to mention there's a lot of maths in physics already with all the equations. If art is your main interest then there's a lot of physics and maths in things like Architecture, Graphic Design and Animation as you often have to work out dimensions and test things out. There's a lot of money in architecture and it's a very well-respected degree.

If none of these interest you, you could always focus in on one area of your interests such as the physics side and then use your spare time to focus on things like art. You could even join a society about it as there will be a range of specialised societies for you to take part in.

Hope this helped!
Lucy - Digital Student Ambassador SHU
Original post by hallamstudents
If art is your main interest then there's a lot of physics and maths in things like Architecture, Graphic Design and Animation as you often have to work out dimensions and test things out. There's a lot of money in architecture and it's a very well-respected degree.


It's a myth that there is a lot of maths and physics in architecture - there is some maths at around GCSE level. There isn't 'a lot of money' in it either - graduate salaries are very average.
Original post by normaw
It's a myth that there is a lot of maths and physics in architecture - there is some maths at around GCSE level. There isn't 'a lot of money' in it either - graduate salaries are very average.

Hi there @normaw !
For more information on Architecture courses and degrees, please see the following links...

https://www.shu.ac.uk/courses/architecture/bsc-honours-architecture/full-time/2023
https://www.glassdoor.co.uk/Salaries/graduate-architect-salary-SRCH_KO0,18.htm

Thanks for your reply, hope this helped!
Lucy - Digital Student Ambassador SHU
Original post by hallamstudents
Hi there @normaw !
For more information on Architecture courses and degrees, please see the following links...

https://www.shu.ac.uk/courses/architecture/bsc-honours-architecture/full-time/2023
https://www.glassdoor.co.uk/Salaries/graduate-architect-salary-SRCH_KO0,18.htm

Thanks for your reply, hope this helped!
Lucy - Digital Student Ambassador SHU

Helpful how? The link to the SHU architecture course shows that no specific A levels are required and the link to glassdoor, despite the headline £67K rate, shows architecture salaries from £24-31k. Glassdoor's salary information is self-reported and not verified, therefore not likely to be accurate.

The first chart in the following article is a more accurate reflection of architects' salaries:

https://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/news/cost-of-living-crisis-can-you-still-afford-to-be-an-architect-in-2023
Original post by normaw
Helpful how? The link to the SHU architecture course shows that no specific A levels are required and the link to glassdoor, despite the headline £67K rate, shows architecture salaries from £24-31k. Glassdoor's salary information is self-reported and not verified, therefore not likely to be accurate.

The first chart in the following article is a more accurate reflection of architects' salaries:

https://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/news/cost-of-living-crisis-can-you-still-afford-to-be-an-architect-in-2023

Hi there @normaw !
Thank you for your reply! I was just trying to show the course content of a typical architecture course which includes artistic and physics based modules including 'Construction Technology'. As far as the salaries go 24-31k salary is very good for a graduate salary, compared to the 14-19k that's estimated for my degree and many other degrees today. I meant it in the sense that if you make a good go of it and work your way up, it can be a very good career choice with an excellent salary and is a very respectable job as the original poster was asking specifically.

Hope I cleared things up, sorry if it seemed a bit ambiguous in my other post. :smile:
Lucy - Digital Student Ambassador SHU
(edited 1 year ago)

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