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Which major would be best for this idea?

I really love all the sciences (biology,chemistry,physics,mathematics,computer science,earth sciences,space sciences etc.) and i want to be a scientist specifically in the research, development or analytics (frankly speaking i want to be an inventor) but i don't want to choose only one or two sciences such
as just biology or biochemistry. I want a major that combines all the sciences in one, basically interdisciplinary so can you recommend the most suitable major in my case?
Original post by Abushaikh
I really love all the sciences (biology,chemistry,physics,mathematics,computer science,earth sciences,space sciences etc.) and i want to be a scientist specifically in the research, development or analytics (frankly speaking i want to be an inventor) but i don't want to choose only one or two sciences such
as just biology or biochemistry. I want a major that combines all the sciences in one, basically interdisciplinary so can you recommend the most suitable major in my case?


Hi, I am a Final-Year Computer Science student. I'm afraid it would be quite hard to recommend just one major in your case since all of the science subjects you've mentioned above are a major on their own and have many small topics within the subjects. If you want to invent something in technology, then maybe you can go for Computer Science and work with other majors' specialists. Another option might be to study a joint major and choose two of the science subjects, or simply finish one degree and then study another degree or a master's in another science. You can also self-study other sciences while doing the major which could help you end up with a position that allows you to have funding for your inventions in the future. Most of the time people do just end up choosing one area of science and becoming an expert in that field then collaborating with other experts in different disciplines, as it takes time to study one science while adapting to the constantly evolving world and technologies. Good luck with pursuing your goal!

- Miyuki (Lancaster University FST Student Ambassador)
Reply 2
Perhaps look at engineering degrees if you’d like to be an inventor? Some people choose earth sciences as they like the breadth of scientific knowledge.
Reply 3
Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador
Hi, I am a Final-Year Computer Science student. I'm afraid it would be quite hard to recommend just one major in your case since all of the science subjects you've mentioned above are a major on their own and have many small topics within the subjects. If you want to invent something in technology, then maybe you can go for Computer Science and work with other majors' specialists. Another option might be to study a joint major and choose two of the science subjects, or simply finish one degree and then study another degree or a master's in another science. You can also self-study other sciences while doing the major which could help you end up with a position that allows you to have funding for your inventions in the future. Most of the time people do just end up choosing one area of science and becoming an expert in that field then collaborating with other experts in different disciplines, as it takes time to study one science while adapting to the constantly evolving world and technologies. Good luck with pursuing your goal!

- Miyuki (Lancaster University FST Student Ambassador)


Can you recommend some majors that will help funding the inventions and also satisfy my pursuit of the sciences?
Reply 4
Original post by Abushaikh
I really love all the sciences (biology,chemistry,physics,mathematics,computer science,earth sciences,space sciences etc.) and i want to be a scientist specifically in the research, development or analytics (frankly speaking i want to be an inventor) but i don't want to choose only one or two sciences such
as just biology or biochemistry. I want a major that combines all the sciences in one, basically interdisciplinary so can you recommend the most suitable major in my case?

For a major that contains multiple science disciplines, check out Natural Sciences which allows you to take different pathways from different sciences simultaneously. Some universities use "Natural Sciences" to talk about mainly a bioscience degree but others will include many different potential science subjects.

You could combine this with a placement year to gain more experience of research in industry and skills outside of university. Then if you want further study maybe follow it up with something like a Masters by Research in your favourite area (research heavy as opposed to doing more exams/coursework)?
Original post by Abushaikh
I really love all the sciences (biology,chemistry,physics,mathematics,computer science,earth sciences,space sciences etc.) and i want to be a scientist specifically in the research, development or analytics (frankly speaking i want to be an inventor) but i don't want to choose only one or two sciences such
as just biology or biochemistry. I want a major that combines all the sciences in one, basically interdisciplinary so can you recommend the most suitable major in my case?

Hi there!

It's great that you're so passionate about so many different sciences! I have just graduated from Lancaster University with a Natural Sciences BSc so thought I could give my experience with the degree as it sounds like it could be something that could work well with your options. Natural Sciences degrees tend to vary by university, so it's definitely worth having a look around to see what course is right for you. At Lancaster, the degree is very flexible, you can choose 3 pathways out of a possible 21. The subjects range from biology, chemistry, physics, psychology, earth sciences, mathematics, computer science, engineering, and more, so there are many different possible combinations! The complete list of different pathways is in the brochure which can be found here - https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/natural-sciences/ . It sounds like you would be looking to do more than 3 so I guess the only drawback with this Natural Sciences programme is that you would be limited to 3 pathways. You can also 'audit' extra modules which means turning up to study them without undertaking assessment for them. They don't count towards your degree but they still show up on your degree transcript as something that you have learnt. These 'audit' modules tend to be confined to the 3 departments that you already sit in however if, for example, you chose to study the 'biochemistry' pathway, you could potentially also audit modules from the 'biology' pathway as they sit in the same department.

Also, it depends on your A-levels/IB qualifications as to which pathways you can study. For example, you can't study the 'physics' pathway without having undertaken a physics A-level, so that's worth bearing in mind too. Some people find it harder to study different subjects in different fields because you have to switch between different ways of working but I actually enjoyed the variety in types of work - for example worksheets in maths, reading in geography, and labs in engineering. I also slowly found the crossover in my subjects, renewable energies and climate change, which is now the sector that I have found a graduate scheme in! The course is great for teaching key skills around research, development, and analytics.

Best of luck with all of your decisions, if you have any further questions, feel free to let me know!

- Bethan (Lancaster University Student Ambassador)
Reply 6
Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador
Hi there!

It's great that you're so passionate about so many different sciences! I have just graduated from Lancaster University with a Natural Sciences BSc so thought I could give my experience with the degree as it sounds like it could be something that could work well with your options. Natural Sciences degrees tend to vary by university, so it's definitely worth having a look around to see what course is right for you. At Lancaster, the degree is very flexible, you can choose 3 pathways out of a possible 21. The subjects range from biology, chemistry, physics, psychology, earth sciences, mathematics, computer science, engineering, and more, so there are many different possible combinations! The complete list of different pathways is in the brochure which can be found here - https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/natural-sciences/ . It sounds like you would be looking to do more than 3 so I guess the only drawback with this Natural Sciences programme is that you would be limited to 3 pathways. You can also 'audit' extra modules which means turning up to study them without undertaking assessment for them. They don't count towards your degree but they still show up on your degree transcript as something that you have learnt. These 'audit' modules tend to be confined to the 3 departments that you already sit in however if, for example, you chose to study the 'biochemistry' pathway, you could potentially also audit modules from the 'biology' pathway as they sit in the same department.

Also, it depends on your A-levels/IB qualifications as to which pathways you can study. For example, you can't study the 'physics' pathway without having undertaken a physics A-level, so that's worth bearing in mind too. Some people find it harder to study different subjects in different fields because you have to switch between different ways of working but I actually enjoyed the variety in types of work - for example worksheets in maths, reading in geography, and labs in engineering. I also slowly found the crossover in my subjects, renewable energies and climate change, which is now the sector that I have found a graduate scheme in! The course is great for teaching key skills around research, development, and analytics.

Best of luck with all of your decisions, if you have any further questions, feel free to let me know!

- Bethan (Lancaster University Student Ambassador)

Thank you very much for the response, i will surely look into this program.
Original post by Abushaikh
Can you recommend some majors that will help funding the inventions and also satisfy my pursuit of the sciences?


Hi! I think what Bethan suggested are some great examples of majors that suit your pursuit of the sciences. I am personally from the School of Computing and Communications (SCC), so I can introduce to you the bachelor's degrees available at SCC: Computer Science, Software Engineering, Cyber Security (new for 2023 entry onwards), and Data Science (new for 2023 entry onwards). They might come in handy when you need to analyze for example the collected biological data from scientific experiments or automate a certain process to continue with the testing of something. I hope this can help you with making the right decision!
Best of luck!

- Miyuki (Lancaster Univesity FST Student Ambassador)
Reply 8
Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador
Hi there!

It's great that you're so passionate about so many different sciences! I have just graduated from Lancaster University with a Natural Sciences BSc so thought I could give my experience with the degree as it sounds like it could be something that could work well with your options. Natural Sciences degrees tend to vary by university, so it's definitely worth having a look around to see what course is right for you. At Lancaster, the degree is very flexible, you can choose 3 pathways out of a possible 21. The subjects range from biology, chemistry, physics, psychology, earth sciences, mathematics, computer science, engineering, and more, so there are many different possible combinations! The complete list of different pathways is in the brochure which can be found here - https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/natural-sciences/ . It sounds like you would be looking to do more than 3 so I guess the only drawback with this Natural Sciences programme is that you would be limited to 3 pathways. You can also 'audit' extra modules which means turning up to study them without undertaking assessment for them. They don't count towards your degree but they still show up on your degree transcript as something that you have learnt. These 'audit' modules tend to be confined to the 3 departments that you already sit in however if, for example, you chose to study the 'biochemistry' pathway, you could potentially also audit modules from the 'biology' pathway as they sit in the same department.

Also, it depends on your A-levels/IB qualifications as to which pathways you can study. For example, you can't study the 'physics' pathway without having undertaken a physics A-level, so that's worth bearing in mind too. Some people find it harder to study different subjects in different fields because you have to switch between different ways of working but I actually enjoyed the variety in types of work - for example worksheets in maths, reading in geography, and labs in engineering. I also slowly found the crossover in my subjects, renewable energies and climate change, which is now the sector that I have found a graduate scheme in! The course is great for teaching key skills around research, development, and analytics.

Best of luck with all of your decisions, if you have any further questions, feel free to let me know!

- Bethan (Lancaster University Student Ambassador)

I want to ask which sciences did you did you choose for this program?
Original post by Abushaikh
I want to ask which sciences did you did you choose for this program?

Hey,

I chose to study Maths, Mechanical Engineering, and Physical Geography. I was also interesting in Environmental Science so I audited a couple of the modules from that in my first year. As I got towards the end of my first year, I was doing well in Maths but preferred the more applied side of my degree, specifically looking at renewable energies and the engineering maths behind them. I therefore studied more Mechanical Engineering in my second year, some Physical Geography, and dropped the Maths. By my final year, I was studying almost all Mechanical Engineering and I then graduated and moved on to a Mechanical Engineering Masters, which I'm studying currently. I would never have started by studying just Mechanical Engineering but Natural Sciences gave me the opportunity to understand what I was most passionate about.

One of the nice things about Natural Sciences is that everyone has a different degree, you still make friends with other Natural Sciences students but they might be attending completely different lectures to you! You also tend to make friends on a module-by-module basis as opposed to by subjects which means you get to meet people from lots of different departments.

Let me know if you have any other questions :smile:

- Bethan (Lancaster University Natural Sciences Student Ambassador)
(edited 8 months ago)
Biomedical engineering might also be worth looking into.

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