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I have just discovered that some demographic do not rinse their dishes after washing

I was scrolling through Instagram and saw a video of a woman washing up as her adult son was acting like a toddler. I realised that she hadn’t rinsed her dishes - which were foaming all over, by the way - after washing.

I got into the comments and saw that some people were agreeing, to my shock might I add! I don’t think I need to talk about the health implications and the soapy smell whilst eating!

Are there any arguments for such barbaric act?!!
(edited 11 months ago)

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That is barbarian behaviour, I’m sorry. It takes 2 seconds to rinse a plate with water after you soap scrub it.
Reply 2
Original post by Sorcerer of Old
That is barbarian behaviour, I’m sorry. It takes 2 seconds to rinse a plate with water after you soap scrub it.


Phew! Some sanity. Apparently, some do it to save on water use 😭
Original post by LegalTom
Phew! Some sanity. Apparently, some do it to save on water use 😭

Rinsing a few plates for a second or two really isn’t going to make much difference in water use. And just leaving all the soap and stuff on there and then eating straight off it probably isn’t good for you either…
(edited 11 months ago)
Reply 4
Original post by LegalTom
I was scrolling through Instagram and saw a video of a woman washing up as her adult son was acting like a toddler. I realised that she hadn’t rinsed her dishes - which were foaming all over, by the way - after washing.

I got into the comments and saw that some people were agreeing, to my shock might I add! I don’t think I need to talk about the health implications and the soapy smell whilst eating!

Are there any arguments for such barbaric act?!!

I have visited some households who do that. Some have claimed that it is to save water whilst some say that they rinse it before using for food. I found it a bit different.
Reply 5
Original post by Wired_1800
I have visited some households who do that. Some have claimed that it is to save water whilst some say that they rinse it before using for food. I found it a bit different.

So, water is used up either way. Why not just rinse it immediately after washing up. Have you eaten from such un-rinsed dish before?
Reply 6
Original post by LegalTom
So, water is used up either way. Why not just rinse it immediately after washing up. Have you eaten from such un-rinsed dish before?


Yeah water is used up either way. I dont think i have eaten from unrinsed dish.
So far I've seen this most commonly in the UK. In fact what I often see is that people in the UK use a tub of dirty water with soap in it in their sinks, just dunk the dish in it a few times and go over it with a sponge, then put it to the side to dry. Rather than having clean, running water to go over it continually while scrubbing with a soapy sponge then rinsing the soap residue off with said water...

Disgusting tub of dirt dishwater as a way to "clean" dishes aside, I can see some logic to people who rinse the dishes before use - as I know my mum regularly does this (even though she washes dishes like I do with rinsing them thoroughly after washing) because a lot of her dishes are not kept in a cupboard but out on open shelves in the kitchen and so tend to get dust and dog hair (!) on them just by virtue of being in the house and not in an enclosed space.
Reply 8
There two camps after washing, the rinsers and the non-rinsers. Presuming both camps get the food residue off, I would say that rinsing is theoretically sensible. This said if you don’t the small residue of detergent you’ll pick up is probably neither here nor there in the scheme of environmental pollutants you’re routinely encountering
Reply 9
Original post by Zarek
There two camps after washing, the rinsers and the non-rinsers. Presuming both camps get the food residue off, I would say that rinsing is theoretically sensible. This said if you don’t the small residue of detergent you’ll pick up is probably neither here nor there in the scheme of environmental pollutants you’re routinely encountering


Sorry, just to clarify, are you suggesting that the detergent residue after washing isn’t considerable enough to worry about? I’m honestly trying to understand your response.
Reply 10
Original post by artful_lounger
So far I've seen this most commonly in the UK. In fact what I often see is that people in the UK use a tub of dirty water with soap in it in their sinks, just dunk the dish in it a few times and go over it with a sponge, then put it to the side to dry. Rather than having clean, running water to go over it continually while scrubbing with a soapy sponge then rinsing the soap residue off with said water...

Disgusting tub of dirt dishwater as a way to "clean" dishes aside, I can see some logic to people who rinse the dishes before use - as I know my mum regularly does this (even though she washes dishes like I do with rinsing them thoroughly after washing) because a lot of her dishes are not kept in a cupboard but out on open shelves in the kitchen and so tend to get dust and dog hair (!) on them just by virtue of being in the house and not in an enclosed space.

Oh my gosh! Dunking, scrubbing and leaving to dry? They might as well not bother washing at all 😭 I just hope this isn’t as common as I’m inclined to think it is! And to think people will argue against your mum’s perfectly reasonable approach!
Reply 11
Original post by LegalTom
Sorry, just to clarify, are you suggesting that the detergent residue after washing isn’t considerable enough to worry about? I’m honestly trying to understand your response.


Yes, in the scheme of things it’s not a big issue. There’s plenty of industrial food manufacturing process where the rinsing process is far from effective too
Reply 12
Original post by Zarek
Yes, in the scheme of things it’s not a big issue. There’s plenty of industrial food manufacturing process where the rinsing process is far from effective too

Overtime, the accretion of detergent in the system, long term, will probably be detrimental - don’t you think?
Reply 13
Original post by LegalTom
Overtime, the accretion of detergent in the system, long term, will probably be detrimental - don’t you think?


I’d be more worried about car exhaust fumes to be honest. But agree, if concerned, why not rinse
Original post by LegalTom
I was scrolling through Instagram and saw a video of a woman washing up as her adult son was acting like a toddler. I realised that she hadn’t rinsed her dishes - which were foaming all over, by the way - after washing.

I got into the comments and saw that some people were agreeing, to my shock might I add! I don’t think I need to talk about the health implications and the soapy smell whilst eating!

Are there any arguments for such barbaric act?!!

I have never heard of anyone doing that :gasp:. That would be like leaving soap on your hands after washing them!
Reply 15
Original post by Rachel_ysj
I have never heard of anyone doing that :gasp:. That would be like leaving soap on your hands after washing them!


Exactly! Apparently, it’s to help save water.
Original post by LegalTom
Exactly! Apparently, it’s to help save water.

I think I would end up using extra water to rinse my mouth from soap after eating.
Reply 17
How much fairy liquid are you lot putting in your dishwashing water each time? One bottle or two
So many people do this. :afraid:
I insist upon having all the dirty dishes washed and dried by a doggie pal. :biggrin:
Reply 19
Original post by Joinedup
How much fairy liquid are you lot putting in your dishwashing water each time? One bottle or two

Question is, do you rinse up even after a drop of fairy? Do you rinse off just not the lather but dirt residue after washing up?

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