The Student Room Group

Masters Pass at Oxbridge any chance of applying for PHD

I was on track to receiving a merit for my masters and for some reason I scored a 58. I am in shock since my supervisor told me it was high merit level worthy. Does this put me out of the running in terms of applying to these places again for a phd in history? Am self funded and going for history. I don't know what I could have done better I feel like there was some horrible bias.
For self-funded it improves your situation although good research groups probably aren’t possible, and a lot of universities won’t be able to consider you without several years experience (as most have a minimum requirement, typically of a good merit).

I strongly advise against self-funded PhDs, it’s a long time & a lot of money when the expectations on you will be of professional level work, with the expectations of a PhD producing publications for your supervisors.
(edited 6 months ago)
Reply 2
Have you spoken with your supervisor about your grade? It seems strange that you would be completely blindsided by a much lower grade than expected, is it possible they have concerns about plagiarism (just as an example, in no way accusing you of anything)
Original post by Stitchery
Have you spoken with your supervisor about your grade? It seems strange that you would be completely blindsided by a much lower grade than expected, is it possible they have concerns about plagiarism (just as an example, in no way accusing you of anything)


A marker won't just knock off a few marks for this, there should be a well defined and rather formal process of investigation first to keep things fair and transparent. The op would be told about this.
Reply 4
Yeah that's a really dumb thing to say stritchey. I looked over my feedback and I have a lot of reason to suspect that my examiners reading my diss weren't even experts in the subject area. They referenced completely abstract and unrelated things and cherrypicked obscure points. I'm going to appeal it.
Reply 5
another idea is to apply for a masters elsewhere? Would they look at my undergrad degree or this masters/
Original post by crunchomunch1
another idea is to apply for a masters elsewhere? Would they look at my undergrad degree or this masters/


For a PhD they will always look at both, but expect a progression, the masters being stronger than the undergrad.
Original post by crunchomunch1
another idea is to apply for a masters elsewhere? Would they look at my undergrad degree or this masters/


Both
Reply 8
Original post by mnot
For self-funded it improves your situation although good research groups probably aren’t possible, and a lot of universities won’t be able to consider you without several years experience (as most have a minimum requirement, typically of a good merit).

I strongly advise against self-funded PhDs, it’s a long time & a lot of money when the expectations on you will be of professional level work, with the expectations of a PhD producing publications for your supervisors.

That isn't how history PhDs work, or any non-science PhD for that matter. You aren't part of a research group and you don't produce publications for your supervisors or with your supervisors name on. You work independently on a project of your own construction, guided by your supervisor, and any articles you publish arising from your research would only have your name on.

There are just a few instances where this doesn't apply, like the AHRC's Collaborative Doctoral Awards where you join an established project that might have perhaps three or four other research staff. But even here you are expected to identify your own research topic (within the bounds of the project). And these are always fully funded from the beginning - you apply to them like jobs. But these only make up something like 30% of all arts and humanities PhDs in the UK - the majority are independently planned by the PhD candidate.

Non-science PhDs really aren't like a job because the only thing you're contributing to is your own intellectual fulfilment. No one derives any financial or reputational benefit from your research other than yourself.
Reply 9
Is it possible that if I apply to a less competitive supervisor who doesn't receive any applications they will take me on?
Reply 10
Original post by crunchomunch1
Is it possible that if I apply to a less competitive supervisor who doesn't receive any applications they will take me on?

It doesn't really work like that
What do you mean?

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