The Student Room Group

What NOT To Bring to Your Student Accommodation/Uni Halls

When you're packing for uni, bringing some things seem obvious - clothes, valid IDs, your laptop/phone - but there's always a couple of things you can't be entirely sure if you'll need. Whilst you should always check your specific student accommodation rules and guidelines, here's a general guide to help you with what not to bring to university.

Candles
Candles initially seem like the perfect thing to help you settle into your new flat, especially if you're the type who likes staying in of a night with a cup of tea and the newest Netflix documentary. But they're also a significant fire risk, and any dripping wax can be hard to get out of carpets. For an alternative, look at reed diffusers or plug-in air fresheners - same clean smell for a lot less worry!

Large Furniture Items
As desperate as you might be to bring an extra storage unit or your desk from home (especially if you're driving to uni), there's usually just not the space for it! Your halls should provide a good amount of storage space and any necessary furniture (e.g. beds/desks), so don't worry about not having what you need.

Kitchen Appliances
Whilst you shouldn't forget your favourite mug and a couple of spare teaspoons, bringing expensive toasters, kettles, blenders or coffee machines to uni can often do more harm than good. You're going to be sharing your kitchen with anywhere between 4-7 other people whose domestic habits you don't know, and you DON'T want to be having an entire-flat argument over who broke your Nespresso machine within the first week. Furthermore, most student accommodations provide at least a basic kettle, toaster and microwave - so most of the time, you're only bringing spares!

Printer
Don't get me wrong, printers are allowed in halls - but they're often a waste of money, especially if you're living close to campus. Lots of unis allow students free printing, and even if yours doesn't, it's usually only a couple of pence per page - much cheaper than buying your own printer and constant supply of ink!

All Of Your Clothes
Whilst it might seem like a good idea to reduce the number of times you have to do laundry by bringing all of your clothes from home, the truth is you really won't need them! If you're anything like me, you'll find yourself wearing the same thing as many times as you can just out of sheer laziness, so don't worry about bringing dozens of different outfits. You likely won't have the space for them either - especially if they're summer clothes you won't wear for ages.

Iron + Ironing Board
In my year at uni, I never ironed a single thing. If you decide you want one however, wait until you arrive in your flat and discuss it with your flatmates. You might get a few different people to chip in for a shared iron, and they're not TOO expensive to begin with (£15-30).

Hope this helps - what would you not bring to uni?

- Eve (Kingston Rep).
To add to this (excellent) thread (thank you again Eve):

Storage:
If you think the photos of your uni room look small, remember that a lot of accommodation tend to have storage space underneath the bed. Even if it looks like a solid wooden bed frame, lift up the mattress and there may well be a little flap that open up your entire under-bed space for all your boxes, suitcase etc. to go. (Oh, and if it doesn't fit under the bed, your big suitcase goes atop your wardrobe.:wink:

Mini-fridge:
Most universities say no to mini fridges. Don't bring one. However, if you have a medical condition which requires refrigerated medicines then a mini fridge should be in your bedroom so that you can hold these medicines securely. Do not use a shared fridge for medication. If you have a medical condition that needs refrigerated medications (Type 1 diabetes is the most common one in this category), then you should apply for Disabled Students Allowance. DSA guidelines say that students living in university-owned accommodation should have a mini-fridge provided by the university, but DSA will provide funding for a mini-fridge for students renting privately.
Reply 2
Just chipping in to say that 'not bringing expensive appliances' cannot be overemphasised. If you're sharing a kitchen, just don't. They broke some of mine and stole some :frown:. Save your expensive appliances. Only bring them if you have your own kitchen like in a studio. If you do bring a kettle (I did because I drink too much tea), keep it in your bedroom.

Also, this might sound excessive but if there's that cutlery set or kitchen utensil you really love, that one you can't find in most stores, keep it in your bedroom too. They can yank anything. They stole my favorite spoon that took me weeks to find. I shall not forget.
Original post by DarylO
If you do bring a kettle (I did because I drink too much tea), keep it in your bedroom.

Oh yeah, on kettles, quite a few unis specifically prohibit kettles altogether. Or if they do permit them, they'll need to be PAT tested so if possible, just avoid bringing.

P.S. Sorry to hear about your spoon Daryl. :frown:
Would always recommend second hand cutlery from your Nan :yep:
Reply 4
Original post by 04MR17
Oh yeah, on kettles, quite a few unis specifically prohibit kettles altogether. Or if they do permit them, they'll need to be PAT tested so if possible, just avoid bringing.

P.S. Sorry to hear about your spoon Daryl. :frown:
Would always recommend second hand cutlery from your Nan :yep:


Ohhh, that's true! My private hall allowed one but the check was a bit tiring. I think most would give you their own kettles for the kitchen.

Also, thanks for mentioning the spoon. I'll definitely be taking second hand stuff from home this year.😂

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