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UCAT is too hard- alternatives to medicine ?

I keep scoring either average or below average on medentry. The only ones i do well in are the ones I do untimed.

Alternatives to medicine?
Reply 1
Original post by WaldenHart
I keep scoring either average or below average on medentry. The only ones i do well in are the ones I do untimed.

Alternatives to medicine?

Practice,Practice and more practice
Reply 2
I keep practising but not improving
Original post by Euapp
Practice,Practice and more practice
Reply 3
Original post by WaldenHart
I keep practising but not improving


@Faisal101 any tips?
Original post by WaldenHart
I keep practising but not improving


depends how your practicing and if your actually reflecting on what your getting wrong. dont just smash out questions randomly for each section. I would spend a day a section or even 2 days a section, this way your mind can really focus on that individual section. what are you specifically struggling on?
Reply 5
Original post by B7861
depends how your practicing and if your actually reflecting on what your getting wrong. dont just smash out questions randomly for each section. I would spend a day a section or even 2 days a section, this way your mind can really focus on that individual section. what are you specifically struggling on?


I keep doing medentry full mocks.. plateaued on a 2490 :frown: Abstract and verbal are awful ive practised individually with no hope. Exams in two weeks im feeling so low
Original post by Euapp
Practice,Practice and more practice

goated advice.
Reply 7
Original post by cantdomathlikefr
goated advice.

Which is why I tagged in Faisal
Reply 8
Original post by WaldenHart
I keep doing medentry full mocks.. plateaued on a 2490 :frown: Abstract and verbal are awful ive practised individually with no hope. Exams in two weeks im feeling so low


Tbh you will probs never get a good score in vr. Like the average score for vr is soooo low. You rarely see anyone get above 700 in vr, and even that is really high for vr. Don’t worry too much about vr, as you likely won’t increase your overall score that way. That time is better spent on sections where you’ll see improvement way more quickly, like ar or qr
Reply 9
But how can i improve ar? Ive done hundreds of sets and still little improvement. It’s so demotivating which is why im doubting if medicine is even worth it.
Original post by WaldenHart
But how can i improve ar? Ive done hundreds of sets and still little improvement. It’s so demotivating which is why im doubting if medicine is even worth it.


there's always BMAT. I got 2490 last year and got an invite from Sunderland (was in Pakistan at the time and no wifi so when I checked my emails found out I was past the deadline to reply)
Reply 11
But im getting those scores at home, comfortable. My real score is probably gonna be lower
Reply 12
QR is the tightest for timing. Realistically, unless you’re a savant at maths, it’s not going to be possible to answer all the questions in time and give them the attention they need.

Try taking the questions untimed. How many can you get perfect in the allotted time without struggling? That’s your target. See if you can maybe increase that by one set but try and learn to let questions go that you can’t work out how to do quickly and just answer them all the same and move on to the next set. You’ll be able to bank a lot more right answers that way. Flag the ones you answer this way and you can return later if you have time, maybe fixing any obviously wrong answers.

VR is more easily improved, in my view, as verbal reasoning relies on a smaller range of skills than QR. It can also be more realistically completed in the allotted time. AR can also be realistically improved because this one is about learning the techniques that they use to produce the questions (eg number, angles, placement, lines of intersection etc.). Like QR, though, you can learn to recognise which ones are unlikely to be possible in that brief amount of time you have.
Original post by TMTDRN
QR is the tightest for timing. Realistically, unless you’re a savant at maths, it’s not going to be possible to answer all the questions in time and give them the attention they need.

Try taking the questions untimed. How many can you get perfect in the allotted time without struggling? That’s your target. See if you can maybe increase that by one set but try and learn to let questions go that you can’t work out how to do quickly and just answer them all the same and move on to the next set. You’ll be able to bank a lot more right answers that way. Flag the ones you answer this way and you can return later if you have time, maybe fixing any obviously wrong answers.

VR is more easily improved, in my view, as verbal reasoning relies on a smaller range of skills than QR. It can also be more realistically completed in the allotted time. AR can also be realistically improved because this one is about learning the techniques that they use to produce the questions (eg number, angles, placement, lines of intersection etc.). Like QR, though, you can learn to recognise which ones are unlikely to be possible in that brief amount of time you have.

You are the first person I’ve ever heard who said vr is easier to improve. If that was the case why is 900 in vr so rare compared to 900 in the other sections.
Reply 14
Original post by Faisal101
You are the first person I’ve ever heard who said vr is easier to improve. If that was the case why is 900 in vr so rare compared to 900 in the other sections.

I’ve consistently scored over 700 in the VR most times I’ve done it, including 840 and 890 on one occasion. However, whenever I’ve come back to it, I start around the 680 range. Every question is based on a single skill, unlike QR, where time needs to be taken to work out what mathematical skill is actually required and in which you may have varying levels of competence across those different skills. You’re also using the same passage for each question, so every question you answer is building up capital for the next one. You can get used to the style of question being asked with practice and you can improve your inferencing that way. There is also no writing out involved in VR, which is time consuming.

There is a theory that people doing medicine tend to have less experience with verbal reasoning tasks due to the A levels they take being mostly science based. But I’d say it’s just as improvable as any other section. The thing about the QR is that the tangible improvements you can make in terms of skill often come at the cost of doing well on other sections and there is a workaround that people who are poor at maths can utilise.

Time is the enemy in QR. I could score 100% easily in most maths questions in that section if I had enough time, as could probably most people sitting it. Skill and practice are often the deficiency in VR, and AR for that matter. It makes sense to try and build up skill in AR and VR and work out a better time strategy for QR.
Original post by TMTDRN
I’ve consistently scored over 700 in the VR most times I’ve done it, including 840 and 890 on one occasion. However, whenever I’ve come back to it, I start around the 680 range. Every question is based on a single skill, unlike QR, where time needs to be taken to work out what mathematical skill is actually required and in which you may have varying levels of competence across those different skills. You’re also using the same passage for each question, so every question you answer is building up capital for the next one. You can get used to the style of question being asked with practice and you can improve your inferencing that way. There is also no writing out involved in VR, which is time consuming.

There is a theory that people doing medicine tend to have less experience with verbal reasoning tasks due to the A levels they take being mostly science based. But I’d say it’s just as improvable as any other section. The thing about the QR is that the tangible improvements you can make in terms of skill often come at the cost of doing well on other sections and there is a workaround that people who are poor at maths can utilise.

Time is the enemy in QR. I could score 100% easily in most maths questions in that section if I had enough time, as could probably most people sitting it. Skill and practice are often the deficiency in VR, and AR for that matter. It makes sense to try and build up skill in AR and VR and work out a better time strategy for QR.

I know vr is definitely improvable I don’t doubt that. I got 610 in 2021 then 700 in 2022. Obviously with practice everything will get better. I just feel like there are few tangible things you can actually do to improve vr, it’s something that comes naturally, so will obviously differ from person to person. I know there are differnt methods on how you read the stem and skimming texts, but that’s about it. There’s not much technique for vr compared to qr. I feel like it’s much steeper learning curve.
I just think it’s so much easier to improve in qr because like you said, most people can get 100% untimed, so all you need to do is work on timing. There are a lot more tangible things you can do, like use a numpad to increase calc speed, make notes without looking, take some time to plan your strategy, estimations, using data from previous questions as you’ll build up info after reading the same stem for each set, planning how to do everything in as few calculations as possible. I personally improved my qr from 640 in 2021 to 900 in 2022.

But yeah I agree with most of what you said 😁

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