The Student Room Group

Doing a Psychology conversion Masters or Law?

Hi guys
I am in my final year doing law but thinking to do my masters in physchology but I dunno wat to do...
I need to find a job too but its so hard to find one in law.
Can I get some advice of what to do.
Can you become a physiologist from doing a masters in physchology?

If you want a career in law then doing a masters in physiology is irrelevant (I wouldn't recommend do any masters for a law career tbh)
Original post by Queen_saf
Hi guys
I am in my final year doing law but thinking to do my masters in physchology but I dunno wat to do...
I need to find a job too but its so hard to find one in law.
Can I get some advice of what to do.


By physchology, do you mean physiology or psychology?
(edited 8 months ago)
Reply 3
Original post by Scotland Yard
By physchology, do you mean physiology or psychology?

Psychology oops sorry
Original post by Queen_saf
Psychology oops sorry

I wasn't sure what you meant either.

I've no idea on the route to becoming a psychologist - but if you can become one from doing a masters after doing a law degree - and that is the career you want to spend the next 45 years in - then do the masters and become a psychologist.

If you want a law career - then do not do the masters. I would advise you try and get a paralegal job (through FlexLegal is good) or honestly just a normal job while you send out applications. A masters in a non-law related field would be of absolutely no use - and tbh would look bad to an employer as it would show you are unsure what career you want and your commitment to law.
Original post by Queen_saf
Psychology oops sorry


Thank you for clarifying :smile: Just so you know, I changed the thread title so that people can see what the thread's about from the title and moved it to the Psychology forum!

My advice would be to follow your dreams! If you want to become a psychologist, then go for a Psychology conversion course. I hope you don't need to know that there are a myriad of jobs within the psychological profession and that having a Psychology course under your belt is just the first step of the journey. Your Psychology conversion MSc (which must be BPS accredited) will be the stepping stone for more studying and training, which will be different depending on what psychological career you wish to follow. The career path isn't always simple or straighforward, but it'll be a rewarding career, if you genuinely wish to do it, plus some of the training will be paid which doesn't hurt!

If you do decide to go down this route, the need for a job might be a little less pressing but possibly still there, although since you'd no longer be wanting to do a law job, your options are broader. You could honestly do pretty much anything you want as long as it'll fit around your studies, although jobs involving mental health or care settings might prove to be beneficial for you later on.
Reply 6
I thought i wanted to become a lawyer but after my school experience, I feel psychology just seems like a better fit. Also if i wanted to come back to law, I could but just want a taste of what Psychology would be like because I could not do it in college.
If I was to do masters in psychology and work in that field for a bit then come back to law.
Original post by Queen_saf
I thought i wanted to become a lawyer but after my school experience, I feel psychology just seems like a better fit. Also if i wanted to come back to law, I could but just want a taste of what Psychology would be like because I could not do it in college.
If I was to do masters in psychology and work in that field for a bit then come back to law.


Bear in mind that you'd have to complete a Masters in psychology (conversion course) and then a professional doctorate to become a psychologist. You could work in psychology without being qualified, but most roles would require a conversion and a substantial amount of experience; it's a lot of time, effort and money to unless you're planning to stay in the psychology field.

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending