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Animation at uni

I am thinking about potentially studying animation at university... however I have no knowledge of that subject and have only done stop motion once. For a portfolio to do animation should I be concerned to have no animation at all and only having drawings and photography??
(edited 8 months ago)
Reply 1
[quote=:) [excludedFace]frown[/excludedFace];98816835]I am thinking about potentially studying animation at university... however I have no knowledge of that subject and have only done stop motion once. For a portfolio to do animation should I be concerned to have no animation at all and only having drawings and photography??

My friend does animation, and I mean if you’re applying to do animation, it’s a good idea to at least have some animation examples in your portfolio (I’ve heard of fine art students even doing this). Just do the simple ball bounce animation, a walk cycle, and if you really want to up your game you could do some harder things (my friend did a horse gallop cycle which is the hardest animal to animate). There are plenty of free animation programmes (or you could go traditional!!) and if you’re interested in stop motion perhaps try doing some more of that?? With your portfolio, show a range of art, traditional, stylised, realistic, etc. My friend wants to work for Disney/Netflix, so she did a lot of character turnarounds and designs.
Reply 2
Thank you so much for your help I'll make sure to include basic animation stuff and explore how I can incorporate more animation to the current pieces I have. 💜
Reply 3
Have a think about what type of animation you are interested in. Stop Motion is quite a niche area these days, most animation is either 2D or 3D (digital), and you have realtime animation for games, animation for visual effects, etc - it might be a good idea if you look into the end result - do you want to work on cartoon series, feature films, stylised or photoreal, do you want to make realtime games? etc... most of these areas are specialist degrees in their own right.
If you can get hold of The Animator's Survival Kit by Richard Williams, that book will show you how to animate walk cycles and lots of the basics of locomotion - it's known as the animator's bible for a reason! If you want to do stop motion, then you'll need to start learning about the armatures and rigs and the puppet construction, in which case there is probably a book on that (sorry stop motion is not my field so I can't advise on that), but if you are interested in digital animation, then you should have either 2D digital animation in your portfolio or 3D digital animation examples in your portfolio... also this depends if you are applying to a decent course or not. A decent course will want you to show that you have researched the field and know what you want to study and have already practised it. Most UK courses will accept anyone because they are not decent... so you also need to decide if you want to work in animation after graduating, or just want to do the degree for fun.

If you want detailed advice on what to put in a portfolio for 2D/3DAnimation&VFX/Games Art/Concept Art, watch this video:
https://vimeo.com/841286222
(edited 8 months ago)
Reply 4
Original post by moid
Have a think about what type of animation you are interested in. Stop Motion is quite a niche area these days, most animation is either 2D or 3D (digital), and you have realtime animation for games, animation for visual effects, etc - it might be a good idea if you look into the end result - do you want to work on cartoon series, feature films, stylised or photoreal, do you want to make realtime games? etc... most of these areas are specialist degrees in their own right.
If you can get hold of The Animator's Survival Kit by Richard Williams, that book will show you how to animate walk cycles and lots of the basics of locomotion - it's known as the animator's bible for a reason! If you want to do stop motion, then you'll need to start learning about the armatures and rigs and the puppet construction, in which case there is probably a book on that (sorry stop motion is not my field so I can't advise on that), but if you are interested in digital animation, then you should have either 2D digital animation in your portfolio or 3D digital animation examples in your portfolio... also this depends if you are applying to a decent course or not. A decent course will want you to show that you have researched the field and know what you want to study and have already practised it. Most UK courses will accept anyone because they are not decent... so you also need to decide if you want to work in animation after graduating, or just want to do the degree for fun.

If you want detailed advice on what to put in a portfolio for 2D/3DAnimation&VFX/Games Art/Concept Art, watch this video:
https://vimeo.com/841286222

Thank you so much!! So far im more interested in the cartoon like 2d animation... which i've already begun practicing with. In terms of wherein applying by what your saying they aren't the top university for animation but for me the finances of university are way more important so that's the deciding factor for me and where I apply. Brighton and uca at the moment are my top choices but getting a good variety in my portfolio Is gonna be a challenge 🤣

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