The Student Room Group

very mature student

Hi guys,

Im a housing site manager (7 years management experience ) looking to change my career either in building surveying or quantity surveying.

I'm, going back to uni next year to do a post grad degree (aged 50) and Im worried I won't get a job after graduating because of my age.

Which out the two degrees would you suggest, taking into consideration my opportunities against younger grads who can offer a longer commitment to a potential employer and shortage of candidates etc.

Thank you in advance.
Life is way too short to worry about that stuff. Just do it and take some confidence going forward. Remember, younger students will still have zero life experience.
Original post by deggy104
Hi guys,

Im a housing site manager (7 years management experience ) looking to change my career either in building surveying or quantity surveying.

I'm, going back to uni next year to do a post grad degree (aged 50) and Im worried I won't get a job after graduating because of my age.

Which out the two degrees would you suggest, taking into consideration my opportunities against younger grads who can offer a longer commitment to a potential employer and shortage of candidates etc.

Thank you in advance.


No employer hires with an expectation of more than 2-3 years, they might hope for more, but they won't plan for it. Plus your logic is the wrong way around, younger employees move on faster because they aren't hampered by family and mortgages, they make more duff choices and they wander off travelling at a whim. Aged 50+ you are much more likely to stick around because you've got commitments that require a steady income.

'Relevant' is a great word for a CV. Relevant Education just needs to show your recent degree, so doesn't age you. Relevant Experience can just pick the latest, assuming that is most relevant.

In terms of which degree, go for the one in which you can leverage most from your current role. Even if it seems like not a lot, if you currently deal with one of those roles more than the other, that gives you an application advantage, because it brings in your past career as relevant. The challenge is very much greater if you can't bring much across from a previous career into a new one - that puts you at the level of the 23 year old graduate. You might have graduated from the exact same course, same time etc, but if you are building on XX years of experience as a client/customer say, that gives you a massive advantage.
Reply 3
Original post by threeportdrift
No employer hires with an expectation of more than 2-3 years, they might hope for more, but they won't plan for it. Plus your logic is the wrong way around, younger employees move on faster because they aren't hampered by family and mortgages, they make more duff choices and they wander off travelling at a whim. Aged 50+ you are much more likely to stick around because you've got commitments that require a steady income.

'Relevant' is a great word for a CV. Relevant Education just needs to show your recent degree, so doesn't age you. Relevant Experience can just pick the latest, assuming that is most relevant.

In terms of which degree, go for the one in which you can leverage most from your current role. Even if it seems like not a lot, if you currently deal with one of those roles more than the other, that gives you an application advantage, because it brings in your past career as relevant. The challenge is very much greater if you can't bring much across from a previous career into a new one - that puts you at the level of the 23 year old graduate. You might have graduated from the exact same course, same time etc, but if you are building on XX years of experience as a client/customer say, that gives you a massive advantage.

Thanks for your input, you have some valid points which I'm going to take on board.

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