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Technical in Fire Engineering

Good morning. I have recently applied for some Fire Engineering Graduate Schemes. My mother wasn't very keen on it as she sees me more in something regarding programming and more technical. Just to ask, is there any technical / programming involved in fire engineering? I look forward to hearing some responses. Thank you.
It's technical in a more practical electronic sense as you may need to deal with installations of fire panels, problems with them being wired wrong and stuff. Doubt there is much programming involved for fire engineers- the alarm receiving software will be developed by separate software dev companies. It's more of a hands on technical thing where you will often be going onto sites to do maintenance and/or check errors, plus as above probably some installations?
Original post by artful_lounger
It's technical in a more practical electronic sense as you may need to deal with installations of fire panels, problems with them being wired wrong and stuff. Doubt there is much programming involved for fire engineers- the alarm receiving software will be developed by separate software dev companies. It's more of a hands on technical thing where you will often be going onto sites to do maintenance and/or check errors, plus as above probably some installations?

You're thinking of who installs fire alarm systems. Fire engineers - often called fire safety engineers - typically sit within consultancies, working alongside other disciplines like structural, mechanical, and electrical, to ensure that fire risks are understood and minimised when designing and refurbishing buildings and other infrastructure. I don't work in this area, but I suspect the job involves much of the same technical skills as other consulting engineers: understanding of codes, standards and best practices, calculations, report writing, possibly use of simulation software, and some other very specific ones. Programming may be used to assist with calculations or running simulations.
Original post by Smack
You're thinking of who installs fire alarm systems. Fire engineers - often called fire safety engineers - typically sit within consultancies, working alongside other disciplines like structural, mechanical, and electrical, to ensure that fire risks are understood and minimised when designing and refurbishing buildings and other infrastructure. I don't work in this area, but I suspect the job involves much of the same technical skills as other consulting engineers: understanding of codes, standards and best practices, calculations, report writing, possibly use of simulation software, and some other very specific ones. Programming may be used to assist with calculations or running simulations.


Interesting point I hadn't considered. The people we used at my old job who did all the installations and maintenance of the fire systems across the estate were called "fire engineers". I would also have anticipated a T-level course would be more aligned with this kind of technical work more than the more analytical nature of engineering in general (which tends to be served by A-levels more commonly)?

I suppose this is part of the issue with the UK not having "engineer" as a protected title - it's not always clear exactly whether one is talking about an engineer(ing role) "proper" or what in other countries would probably be called an engineering technician/technologist (role)....
Original post by artful_lounger
Interesting point I hadn't considered. The people we used at my old job who did all the installations and maintenance of the fire systems across the estate were called "fire engineers". I would also have anticipated a T-level course would be more aligned with this kind of technical work more than the more analytical nature of engineering in general (which tends to be served by A-levels more commonly)?

I suppose this is part of the issue with the UK not having "engineer" as a protected title - it's not always clear exactly whether one is talking about an engineer(ing role) "proper" or what in other countries would probably be called an engineering technician/technologist (role)....

Yes you're right. "Fire engineer" is a not clearly defined term. I read graduate schemes and assumed - perhaps wrongly - that it was for roles at the consultancies. I certainly agree with what you said for engineers/technicians who service fire safety equipment. Hopefully the OP can clarify what the role is.
Reply 5
Original post by Smack
Yes you're right. "Fire engineer" is a not clearly defined term. I read graduate schemes and assumed - perhaps wrongly - that it was for roles at the consultancies. I certainly agree with what you said for engineers/technicians who service fire safety equipment. Hopefully the OP can clarify what the role is.

I applied for this scheme for 2 different companies - Mott Macdonald and Transport for London

MM: Job Description
Before making an application, please browse all graduate opportunities available as we will accept one application per candidate. Once you have made an application you will not be able to make changes to your selection or make a new application. The exception is if we open new vacancies in the new year.
To avoid missing out on this opportunity, we recommend that you apply as soon as possible as we will close when the positions have been filled.
Fire engineering is one of the most important investments and critical considerations that can be made on almost any engineering project. Standard fire safety design guides can be overly restrictive, or simply not fit for purpose, on the design of buildings and transportation infrastructure, especially for innovative or bespoke design projects.
Our specialist fire safety engineering team offers an alternative and dynamic approach to fire engineering design, that ensures that structures in the built environment transportation infrastructure and their occupants are as safe from the effects of fire as can be reasonably expected.
A full fire safety package will be demonstrated using either a dynamic or prescriptive approach, or both depending on the specific project. We incorporate the most appropriate methods of fire protection from a host of engineering techniques which help to minimise the impact of fire on built environment and transport projects, providing cost efficiencies and environmental benefits where appropriate and ultimately improving the overall resilience and safety of buildings and infrastructure around the world.
The nature of fire-engineering requires the development of strong technical, interpersonal and negotiating skills to deliver the best design to your clients.
You will help the team develop ‘fire strategies’: documents outlining the life safety systems, firefighting provisions, and any technically derived fire-engineered solutions required to meet the overarching design goals. This involves regular contact with the client and design team, any associated site visits, and office-based report writing including technical analyses.
Our award-winning reputation means our clients expect and demand the very best in fire safety advice. We provide fire engineering consultancy services for prestigious buildings and transport projects worldwide, across a range of sectors. From healthcare premises, to sporting facilities, military and high value/sensitive installations to surface and sub-surface rail stations.

TFL: What you'll be doing
[start]Your 2-year development programme will be made up of up to 8 placement rotations.[/start]
[start]Projects will vary but can include design within multi-disciplines including fire, mechanical, electrical, communications and system design including fire interfaces.[/start]
[start]The programme will provide you first-hand experience working on sites with construction teams. You'll learn about:[/start]

Emergency management

Installation of fire related systems

Fire interfacing systems

[start]You'll also gain exposure to business operations, procedures network management and emergency procedures throughout the TfL network.[/start]
Original post by Smack
Yes you're right. "Fire engineer" is a not clearly defined term. I read graduate schemes and assumed - perhaps wrongly - that it was for roles at the consultancies. I certainly agree with what you said for engineers/technicians who service fire safety equipment. Hopefully the OP can clarify what the role is.

TTo be fair I didn't see the reference to grad schemes and thought this was about T levels although reading through again I'm not sure why!

I suspect you are correct and I've just failed some basic reading comprehension and added a bunch if irrelevant material :redface:
Original post by NeverGivingUp
I applied for this scheme for 2 different companies - Mott Macdonald and Transport for London

MM: Job Description
Before making an application, please browse all graduate opportunities available as we will accept one application per candidate. Once you have made an application you will not be able to make changes to your selection or make a new application. The exception is if we open new vacancies in the new year.
To avoid missing out on this opportunity, we recommend that you apply as soon as possible as we will close when the positions have been filled.
Fire engineering is one of the most important investments and critical considerations that can be made on almost any engineering project. Standard fire safety design guides can be overly restrictive, or simply not fit for purpose, on the design of buildings and transportation infrastructure, especially for innovative or bespoke design projects.
Our specialist fire safety engineering team offers an alternative and dynamic approach to fire engineering design, that ensures that structures in the built environment transportation infrastructure and their occupants are as safe from the effects of fire as can be reasonably expected.
A full fire safety package will be demonstrated using either a dynamic or prescriptive approach, or both depending on the specific project. We incorporate the most appropriate methods of fire protection from a host of engineering techniques which help to minimise the impact of fire on built environment and transport projects, providing cost efficiencies and environmental benefits where appropriate and ultimately improving the overall resilience and safety of buildings and infrastructure around the world.
The nature of fire-engineering requires the development of strong technical, interpersonal and negotiating skills to deliver the best design to your clients.
You will help the team develop ‘fire strategies’: documents outlining the life safety systems, firefighting provisions, and any technically derived fire-engineered solutions required to meet the overarching design goals. This involves regular contact with the client and design team, any associated site visits, and office-based report writing including technical analyses.
Our award-winning reputation means our clients expect and demand the very best in fire safety advice. We provide fire engineering consultancy services for prestigious buildings and transport projects worldwide, across a range of sectors. From healthcare premises, to sporting facilities, military and high value/sensitive installations to surface and sub-surface rail stations.

TFL: What you'll be doing
[start]Your 2-year development programme will be made up of up to 8 placement rotations.[/start]
[start]Projects will vary but can include design within multi-disciplines including fire, mechanical, electrical, communications and system design including fire interfaces.[/start]
[start]The programme will provide you first-hand experience working on sites with construction teams. You'll learn about:[/start]

Emergency management

Installation of fire related systems

Fire interfacing systems

[start]You'll also gain exposure to business operations, procedures network management and emergency procedures throughout the TfL network.[/start]


The first one definitely sounds along the lines of what smack was advising on so ignore what I've written in terms of that one and focus on smacks advice!

The second one I'm not actually sure where it sits on the spectrum as it does tall about installations and such?
(edited 3 months ago)
Thanks for adding the job descriptions @NeverGivingUp.

Mott Macdonald are a large engineering consultancy so the role may be a bit like I described. The role at TFL will be client side, so may include some elements like @artful_lounger explained, as client side, i.e. the organisation that actually owns the infrastructure/equipment, you're usually working more on day-to-day, operational issues, though as a graduate level role I don't think it's likely be an an actual hands-on installation and maintenance role.

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