The Student Room Group

Any chance I could convince Cambridge to let me in after rejecting me ?

So I know I effed up the interview, and I know for a fact I won't get in (results come out end of January). I also know this is far fetched and probably won't happen (I am happy with my other universities so no need to try and convince me it's fine, because I know!). But let's say I get through to round two on the chemistry olympiad during the end of January (which only 25-30 students do) if I work very very hard on it. Is there then a chance that if I then emailed my college, or maybe any other college, and asked if they could let me in, would they? I could say that I am happy to come back for another interview anyway, and I'm sure they can squeeze in one more person? By the way I'm not just doing this for Cambridge, I am scoring highly so far and I'd like to try my best to do very well in the olympiad anyway. What do you think?

Scroll to see replies

That's not how it works. Also, you don't know how they will ultimately consider things from the interview - @Doones did an analysis a few years ago and found that there was basically no correlation between how TSR posters thought their interview went vs whether they got an offer in the end of nor.

If it does work out that you don't get an offer, if you do end up doing well on your A-levels and engaging in the kinds of activities you describe above, you may want to consider reapplying in a gap year.

But you can't call them up after a rejection and ask them to reconsider - they won't. You also can't ask other colleges to consider you, as they have a pooling process so you either will have gone through the pool and been rejected by the other colleges, or the college that interviewed you did not feel you were strong enough to be considered by the other colleges. So your best (and only) option in that case would still be gap year and reapply.
Reply 2
Original post by Anonymous #1
So I know I effed up the interview, and I know for a fact I won't get in (results come out end of January). I also know this is far fetched and probably won't happen (I am happy with my other universities so no need to try and convince me it's fine, because I know!). But let's say I get through to round two on the chemistry olympiad during the end of January (which only 25-30 students do) if I work very very hard on it. Is there then a chance that if I then emailed my college, or maybe any other college, and asked if they could let me in, would they? I could say that I am happy to come back for another interview anyway, and I'm sure they can squeeze in one more person? By the way I'm not just doing this for Cambridge, I am scoring highly so far and I'd like to try my best to do very well in the olympiad anyway. What do you think?

No, this would be pointless. What and see what happens ... if rejected then move on.
Reply 3
Original post by artful_lounger
That's not how it works. Also, you don't know how they will ultimately consider things from the interview - @Doones did an analysis a few years ago and found that there was basically no correlation between how TSR posters thought their interview went vs whether they got an offer in the end of nor.

If it does work out that you don't get an offer, if you do end up doing well on your A-levels and engaging in the kinds of activities you describe above, you may want to consider reapplying in a gap year.

But you can't call them up after a rejection and ask them to reconsider - they won't. You also can't ask other colleges to consider you, as they have a pooling process so you either will have gone through the pool and been rejected by the other colleges, or the college that interviewed you did not feel you were strong enough to be considered by the other colleges. So your best (and only) option in that case would still be gap year and reapply.

Thank you! It was very clear to me that I did badly though like genuinely, I could tell. Are you absolutely sure there's no way? Because if I score in the top 0.25% of people that do the chemistry olympiads, is there no way they could make an exception and reconsider?
Reply 4
Original post by Anonymous
Thank you! It was very clear to me that I did badly though like genuinely, I could tell. Are you absolutely sure there's no way? Because if I score in the top 0.25% of people that do the chemistry olympiads, is there no way they could make an exception and reconsider?

No.
(edited 2 months ago)
Reply 5
Original post by Anonymous
Thank you! It was very clear to me that I did badly though like genuinely, I could tell. Are you absolutely sure there's no way? Because if I score in the top 0.25% of people that do the chemistry olympiads, is there no way they could make an exception and reconsider?

Sorry but it's not going to work that way. If you think that you have a significantly improved profile between this year and next year's application window then you could consider reapplying, but a no is unfortunately a final decision for this round.
(edited 2 months ago)
Original post by rebecca9801
Thank you! It was very clear to me that I did badly though like genuinely, I could tell. Are you absolutely sure there's no way? Because if I score in the top 0.25% of people that do the chemistry olympiads, is there no way they could make an exception and reconsider?

Even you get first can't guarantee a In unfortunately.
The interview is interesting thing, someone said its a bad sign if you felt unchallenged.
Original post by Anonymous #1
So I know I effed up the interview, and I know for a fact I won't get in (results come out end of January). I also know this is far fetched and probably won't happen (I am happy with my other universities so no need to try and convince me it's fine, because I know!). But let's say I get through to round two on the chemistry olympiad during the end of January (which only 25-30 students do) if I work very very hard on it. Is there then a chance that if I then emailed my college, or maybe any other college, and asked if they could let me in, would they? I could say that I am happy to come back for another interview anyway, and I'm sure they can squeeze in one more person? By the way I'm not just doing this for Cambridge, I am scoring highly so far and I'd like to try my best to do very well in the olympiad anyway. What do you think?

unfortunately some extremely talented ppl who've got significant accolades like olympiad and essay comp wins still get rejected from ox and cam every year. i think you'll just have to reapply if u really want to go to cam and don't get in this year
Be content you got the interview opportunity. Lots of people get rejected due to the competitiveness of the applicant pool (including myself this year ☹️ ) ..I'm afraid that you won't be able to mention this to them this year and if you email the college letting them know that this is the case, they won't care. Adding the Chemistry Olympiad will mean nothing as after the interview phase, they will consider your interview score in addition to your admissions test results to determine your merit (your personal statement will still count for something but a lot less than what it was pre-interview). Also, there is a reason that there is an early applicant deadline detailing that you have to send all of your details and activities before a certain date - it's so that people don't keep on adding stuff to it. They even made an SAQ for people to complete that allowed you to add any extra activities you have done and wish to add in addition to talking about why Cambridge etc. I don't think that there is something similar to the SAQ after the interview.

Going to Cambridge will no doubt prepare you well for the graduate workforce but by no means is it the only option. If you are set to go into academia, there are 130 universities in the UK where you can conduct research (it's not just Oxbridge) so you have options.

Just out of interest, what are your other options?
UCAS doesn't even have the fields for you to fill in Olympiad awards. I know an applicant didn't mention all of his three BMO 1 gold medals in his application process.
Original post by Anonymous #2
UCAS doesn't even have the fields for you to fill in Olympiad awards. I know an applicant didn't mention all of his three BMO 1 gold medals in his application process.

I applied for Computing and I didn't even mention the UKMT competitions I took part in. I got two gold certificates in SMC, One BMO1 qualification, one merit certificate in Andrew Jobbings Kangaroo for y12 and y13 (probably why I got rejected from Cambridge along with fumbling the TMUA admissions test. There were 7 different admissions tests taking place at the same time with the end timings being presented in a tabular format. I saw the wrong timing and when I started marking my answer sheet, I saw that I had 15-20 mins left. Two minutes later, I got told to put pencils down and I only managed to shade 9 out of 20 lozenges for the first paper, which is normally the one that carries my mark up. The annoying thing is that during my practice papers, I was scoring 7.0+ but in the actual thing, I only got 4.5). There's others as well from previous years for IMC and JMC and their follow-up rounds respectively.
Original post by Anonymous #3
Be content you got the interview opportunity. Lots of people get rejected due to the competitiveness of the applicant pool (including myself this year ☹️ ) ..I'm afraid that you won't be able to mention this to them this year and if you email the college letting them know that this is the case, they won't care. Adding the Chemistry Olympiad will mean nothing as after the interview phase, they will consider your interview score in addition to your admissions test results to determine your merit (your personal statement will still count for something but a lot less than what it was pre-interview). Also, there is a reason that there is an early applicant deadline detailing that you have to send all of your details and activities before a certain date - it's so that people don't keep on adding stuff to it. They even made an SAQ for people to complete that allowed you to add any extra activities you have done and wish to add in addition to talking about why Cambridge etc. I don't think that there is something similar to the SAQ after the interview.

Going to Cambridge will no doubt prepare you well for the graduate workforce but by no means is it the only option. If you are set to go into academia, there are 130 universities in the UK where you can conduct research (it's not just Oxbridge) so you have options.

Just out of interest, what are your other options?

I'm sorry you didn't get in! Are you studying at another uni now? If so, which one?
My other options are durham, baths, leeds, king's (king's is my backup). I've got an offer from leeds and haven't heard back from the other ones but I do think/hope I'll get into durham because I really liked it.
Yeah ok I guess I'll just have to accept I won't get in, maybe it's somehow for the best.
Thanks :smile:
(edited 2 months ago)
Original post by AF2Dr
Seems pretty odd that they wouldn't mention that in their personal statement.

These awards will become useless if you get to the interview stage. You can see the interviewer's report form of C and find no place for these awards. It is well known that the interviewer will not look at your PS for maths subjects.
They’re looking for the best candidates for the course not the most annoying or persistent.
Original post by PQ
They’re looking for the best candidates for the course not the most annoying or persistent.

😂😂😂
Original post by AF2Dr
But why wouldn't a candidate mention gold BMO medals in their PS? What would they be prioritising in their PS ahead of that?

Sorry, but not mentioning gold BMO medals seems odd to me. Those are objectively very good achievements.

And if the applicant didn't have space it's a bit wild that the referee didn't include them.
Original post by Admit-One
And if the applicant didn't have space it's a bit wild that the referee didn't include them.

Unfortunately, C doesn't give offers based on the performance of competitions rather than interviews. However, I understand that the referee did mention at least one in the reference letter. It is suggested that PS is the place to show interest, not achievements. In the other TSR thread, the maths tutor from Oxford clearly said they don't care about your UKMT performance, they care about the interview.
Original post by AF2Dr
Getting 3 gold BMO medals also shows interest, as well as achievement. And it's a more objective marker than vague statements about passion for maths.

I would consider it a very poor decision for an applicant to leave that out of a personal statement (I am just making this point in case future applicants etc are reading this thread). I cannot believe that someone couldn't have room in their PS for that. I can't think of much which would be more impressive for a maths PS?

Cambridge might care, they might not, but deliberately witholding information about impressive relevant achievements does not make sense. Even if they don't care, other universities might be impressed, and there is no disadvantage to mentioning it.

Got your points. But if you had around 10 medals from JMO up, quite a few full marks of challenge and a few top scores in other subjects, there is no point in listing it in PS.
Reply 19
Original post by Anonymous #2
Unfortunately, C doesn't give offers based on the performance of competitions rather than interviews. However, I understand that the referee did mention at least one in the reference letter. It is suggested that PS is the place to show interest, not achievements. In the other TSR thread, the maths tutor from Oxford clearly said they don't care about your UKMT performance, they care about the interview.

In case anyone else reads this, you were given bad advice.

Even once you get to the Interview stage at Cambridge, they do not just look at interview performance. They look at everything before making a decision.

Cambridge certainly does like to see performance of competitions, particularly ones achieved in the last couple of years.

PS should include achievement. There is even a "Your personal skills and achievements" section in UCAS guidelines: https://www.ucas.com/undergraduate/applying-university/writing-personal-statement/how-write-personal-statement

(edited 2 months ago)

Quick Reply

Latest