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Actual Masters Chances?

Hi! I am studying law in Malta and my degree is shaping up to be a high 2.2 (67% since 70% is a 2.1 here). I would love to move back to the UK, study for an LLM, PGDip (which would eventually lead to masters) or MA, and possibly practice there. I would have a Master provided by my university based on law.

Many universities require a 2.1 but state that students with lower qualifications will be considered on an individual basis. What are the actual chances of being accepted through the non-standard route? Do people actually get accepted?

(I am looking at Uni of Birmingham, Newcastle, York, Southampton, Leeds, KCL, QMUL, Sheffield, Nottingham, Liverpool, Leeds, Exeter, Bristol, Kent, and Reading)

Thanks :smile:
(edited 5 months ago)
Original post by kelagiorgio
Hi! I am studying law in Malta and my degree is shaping up to be a high 2.2 (67% since 70% is a 2.1 here). I would love to move back to the UK, study for an LLM, PGDip (which would eventually lead to masters) or MA, and possibly practice there. I would have a Master provided by my university based on law.

Many universities require a 2.1 but state that students with lower qualifications will be considered on an individual basis. What are the actual chances of being accepted through the non-standard route? Do people actually get accepted?

(I am looking at Uni of Birmingham, Newcastle, York, Southampton, Leeds, KCL, QMUL, Sheffield, Nottingham, Liverpool, Leeds, Exeter, Bristol, Kent, and Reading)

Thanks :smile:


Actual chances of getting an offer from that number and level of universities - very high chance you will get 2-3 at least. However, chances of getting any funding - very low to nil.

Check out the newish routes to practicing law int he UK and be realistic and honest with yourself about the competitiveness of the routes and your likely success, before you invest in expensive courses.
Original post by kelagiorgio
Hi! I am studying law in Malta and my degree is shaping up to be a high 2.2 (67% since 70% is a 2.1 here). I would love to move back to the UK, study for an LLM, PGDip (which would eventually lead to masters) or MA, and possibly practice there. I would have a Master provided by my university based on law.

Many universities require a 2.1 but state that students with lower qualifications will be considered on an individual basis. What are the actual chances of being accepted through the non-standard route? Do people actually get accepted?

(I am looking at Uni of Birmingham, Newcastle, York, Southampton, Leeds, KCL, QMUL, Sheffield, Nottingham, Liverpool, Leeds, Exeter, Bristol, Kent, and Reading)

Thanks :smile:

Hi,
Obviously It would likely depend on the individual university, however, if they like other things they see on your application and you interview well, many are willing to accept you.
Bare in mind that sometimes the competitive nature of the course and number of applicants can affect this.
If in doubt, always reach out to universities admin teams or course leaders about what they accept.
Best of luck,
Meg 🙂
MA Popular Music Student
Original post by kelagiorgio
Hi! I am studying law in Malta and my degree is shaping up to be a high 2.2 (67% since 70% is a 2.1 here). I would love to move back to the UK, study for an LLM, PGDip (which would eventually lead to masters) or MA, and possibly practice there. I would have a Master provided by my university based on law.

Many universities require a 2.1 but state that students with lower qualifications will be considered on an individual basis. What are the actual chances of being accepted through the non-standard route? Do people actually get accepted?

(I am looking at Uni of Birmingham, Newcastle, York, Southampton, Leeds, KCL, QMUL, Sheffield, Nottingham, Liverpool, Leeds, Exeter, Bristol, Kent, and Reading)

Thanks :smile:

Hi, unrelated to your question (sorry!) but what is your opinion of studying in malta, and studying law there. Would you recommend it?
Reply 4
Original post by evaharbison123
Hi, unrelated to your question (sorry!) but what is your opinion of studying in malta, and studying law there. Would you recommend it?

Honestly, I don't think studying law in Malta is the best place to study it. Our marking schemes are much higher than in the UK and each year is weighted equally in our faculty; no one has gotten a first class honours in law in ages! Sometimes, lecturers can't agree between themselves on what the 'correct' answer to a question is, so your marks end up in the hands of luck. Lecturers aren't always too reliable, since most of them are full time lawyers and do teaching on the side (this is mainly an issue for dissertation purposes). Therefore, while lecturers may be very accomplished lawyers, they may not be great teachers.

I'd also say there is a problem with assessing modules fairly, where most subjects are closed book and assessed in one exam, and only examine your memory and not your understanding of the law and practical legal issues. This leaves many new lawyers struggling to actually WORK as lawyers, due to the course being based on theory and not actually working as lawyers and interpreting/applying the law.

Despite that, I've gotten the opportunity to be taught by very intelligent legal minds (some retired) that have achieved a lot both locally and internationally. Many Maltese lawyers take the opportunity to work and study abroad once their basic degree is done, so they tend to have a more holistic view of issues tackled in class, and they often leave you in awe of how intelligent they are! I'd also say that the student community within the law course at UM is very positive, where student organisations offer various things to support every student; past papers, passed down notes, moot courts, international exchanges, and networking events. Many lecturers are overall very friendly (as is the Maltese nature) and end up offering internships to students for the summer.

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