The Student Room Group

When do I start enjoying Uni?

For my whole childhood I thought almost literally every aspect of uni sounded horrible but thanks to a lack of real alternatives I caved and listenend to the people who said it would be ok and I'd end up liking it. I'd love to know when exactly this is going to happen because although I like the independence of living alone I hate everything else. Yes I've made a few friends but that's basically not helping. My lecturer keeps going on about how we're all passionate about what we're doing and that's why we chose to come here and I just have absolutely none of it and don't care about half the stuff he says.
Reply 1
WHy are you doing the subject you are doing if you don't care about it? It's always a terrible idea to do this.
Sounds like the next 2.5yrs are going to be a slog at best.
Original post by Anonymous #1
For my whole childhood I thought almost literally every aspect of uni sounded horrible but thanks to a lack of real alternatives I caved and listenend to the people who said it would be ok and I'd end up liking it. I'd love to know when exactly this is going to happen because although I like the independence of living alone I hate everything else. Yes I've made a few friends but that's basically not helping. My lecturer keeps going on about how we're all passionate about what we're doing and that's why we chose to come here and I just have absolutely none of it and don't care about half the stuff he says.

Hey,

I get what you're saying. University can be this big, overwhelming thing that people build up as this unique experience, and it's frustrating when you're not feeling it. I remember entering uni with all these preconceived notions. The reality didn't match at first. It's normal to feel a bit lost and disconnected.

The independence of living alone is a plus, but it doesn't negate the other challenges. Making a few friends is a good start, but it doesn't magically fix everything. Sometimes, the pressure to love every aspect of university can be suffocating. I've been there.

And about the lecturer's talks on passion it's okay not to feel it. We all have different reasons for being here, and it's okay if you're not overflowing with excitement. Finding your track takes time.

What helped me was permitting myself to feel this way and acknowledging that it's a process. You might not fall head over heels for uni immediately, and that's okay. It's about finding your pace, people, and what interests you.

Cheers,
MSc Internaational Business Student.
It sounds like you may need to change subject to be honest, you should choose a subject to possibly restart in September if this course isn’t for you, which it sounds like it isn’t. This is no big deal though if you decide to do so, many people change courses, drop out and restart, or even take a whole gap year and come back the following.

It may also be your university choice that is making you feel like this as not all university environments are the same. Bath Spa has the balance of scenic environment, smaller classes nice teachers and the city life, whereas Leeds is much more full on and busy being in the heart of the city.

I would suggest you look at alternative courses if this isn’t for you, or maybe even different universities.

I was going to go to Royal Holloway for geography but the teachers didn’t seem enthusiastic or as interesting as some at other universities I visited at the time, even though it has a good ranking. You need to go where is best for you, your wants and needs, and your course.
Original post by Anonymous #1
For my whole childhood I thought almost literally every aspect of uni sounded horrible but thanks to a lack of real alternatives I caved and listenend to the people who said it would be ok and I'd end up liking it. I'd love to know when exactly this is going to happen because although I like the independence of living alone I hate everything else. Yes I've made a few friends but that's basically not helping. My lecturer keeps going on about how we're all passionate about what we're doing and that's why we chose to come here and I just have absolutely none of it and don't care about half the stuff he says.
Hi there,

I think for a lot of people the start of university can be super challenging. It's very different to what you are used to and can be really hard to adapt, I know I found it hard at the start.
In terms of being passionate about your degree, I think there are always aspects to every degree which people don't enjoy. I am sure you will find a part of it which you find more interesting/enjoyable soon.

I really hope this helps,

Ellen
Y4 Medical Student
Uni of Sunderland
Original post by Anonymous #1
For my whole childhood I thought almost literally every aspect of uni sounded horrible but thanks to a lack of real alternatives I caved and listenend to the people who said it would be ok and I'd end up liking it. I'd love to know when exactly this is going to happen because although I like the independence of living alone I hate everything else. Yes I've made a few friends but that's basically not helping. My lecturer keeps going on about how we're all passionate about what we're doing and that's why we chose to come here and I just have absolutely none of it and don't care about half the stuff he says.
Hi there

It is good to hear that you have found some friends and like the independence that University gives. :smile:

Whilst some students may go into University knowing exactly what course they want to do and what career they will go into, this is not the case for everyone. There is no need to force yourself to be passionate about a course, and since it is only early stages of University, it may be the module that is not as interesting, so maybe you would still like to give it a go?

Alternatively, do you have any courses that you are interested in? It is often useful to remind yourself why you chose the course, I find this often helps me get through time when I feel uncertain about my choices.

At the same time, whilst studying is important at University, I like the aspect of University where I can explore different hobbies, find my own lifestyle, create a good routine. There is much more to University than studying, if you have not already I would recommend joining a few societies, it is a really good time to explore different hobbies. :smile:

I hope this helps.
Chloe
University of Kent Student Rep
Reply 7
Maybe a degree apprenticeship would suit you better.On the job training,uni one day or so.If you are not particularly into academic study uni is not ideal.Nephew was paid to do his surveying degree.No debt and now fully qualified.Just felt uni not for you.

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