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I'm a teacher ask me anything Watch

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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    Have you grown a beard so you don't get mistaken for a pupil?
    No I have no facial hair and consequently I have been mistaken for a sixth former on plenty of occasions.

    (Original post by namename)
    When the brats become really obnoxious, do you want to slap them hard?
    I'm not a violent person so no but if I were a violent person then probably yes.
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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    Any of the topics to do with differentiation and integration really.
    Nothing in C2 do they particularly struggle on?
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    (Original post by jshep000)
    Nothing in C2 do they particularly struggle on?
    Logs and exponentials I forgot to mention.
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    How important are A levels? And if you failed would you retake it? Or do a access course I'm really worried that I'm wasting my time since I am 18
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    (Original post by JustaDreamer)
    Sorry if these questions have been asked already!

    How much time do you commit to marking books etc. at home each night?

    Do you feel this heavily impacts on personal life?

    Would you recommend teaching to someone who is considering it? (me )

    If you did recommend, what advice would you give?

    Sorry for the spam of questions
    1. About 3 hours - I tend to stay in school until it's all done though. Sometimes I don't leave until after 6pm (school finishes at 3).

    2. Yes, hugely. I'm often too tired to see my friends on Friday night and sometimes even too tired on the Saturday. I never socialise during the weekdays really.

    3. Yes

    4. You have to be able to accept that there will be extremely difficult days; days when you just want to give up, days when you have breakdowns, days when you feel that you're alone and you just can't cope. You will get through though.
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    (Original post by Lola96)
    How important are A levels? And if you failed would you retake it? Or do a access course I'm really worried that I'm wasting my time since I am 18
    Depends what you mean by failed but certainly they are worth retaking if you think you could have done significantly better than you did.
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    I ended up getting E's and D's but I truly do believe I could have done a better job at it, but the problem is my college won't allow for me to retake my exams
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    (Original post by Lola96)
    I ended up getting E's and D's but I truly do believe I could have done a better job at it, but the problem is my college won't allow for me to retake my exams
    Would you be able to go somewhere else?
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    I'm currently thinking about doing that since I really want to university next year, I'm wondering if it is possible for me to do the full A level in one year in a private college or either go into higher education and do a access course for one year
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    What do you think of teachers who don't ever finish teaching the syllabus and as a student your forced to learn it all on your own?!
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    (Original post by Lola96)
    I'm currently thinking about doing that since I really want to university next year, I'm wondering if it is possible for me to do the full A level in one year in a private college or either go into higher education and do a access course for one year
    I'm not sure to be honest as I've not had dealings with Year 13 so this goes beyond my role as a maths teacher.

    (Original post by boodle123)
    What do you think of teachers who don't ever finish teaching the syllabus and as a student your forced to learn it all on your own?!
    In most cases they are at fault although I'd be hesitant to judge as they may have had a really disruptive class and had to take a 'quality over quantity' approach to the syllabus. We do this in maths sometimes with a really bad class and just isolate parts of the syllabus that we want to focus on and drill into them rather than be broad and risk them not learning any of it at all.
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    Just out of curiosity, looking back, what were you like as a student?
    As a teacher now, how would you perceive a similar student?

    Great thread, btw! Inspiring to see that you're trying to connect with students yet you're still able to keep it professional! You seem like a credit to our education system!
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    (Original post by HannahL96)
    Just out of curiosity, looking back, what were you like as a student?
    As a teacher now, how would you perceive a similar student?

    Great thread, btw! Inspiring to see that you're trying to connect with students yet you're still able to keep it professional! You seem like a credit to our education system!
    I was never disruptive but I was disengaged and lazy. I would always do the bare minimum in class and at home. I didn't revise for my GCSEs at all and missed my target grade on every single one, including maths.

    I find it difficult to deal with students like this since their behaviour does not automatically demand attention. They know exactly what they can get away with and will always do just enough work so as not to get a detention. I will tell them that they need to put more effort in when I speak to their parents at parents' evening (assuming that they turn up - my parents never went to a single one). I will comment in their book that they need to up their game and keep an eye on them a bit more in the lesson.

    The trouble is that there's usually something more pressing to deal with in a lesson; someone will be getting ready to throw a plane across the room or someone will be shouting obscenities relating to another student's mother and my attention will go away from the disengaged student who is sitting quietly twiddling his thumbs.
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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    I'm reluctant to put all the blame on the pupils. What's become clear to me since I've started teaching is that these problems would be pretty much eradicated if these students had strong, firm discipline both at home and at school. The outrageous reluctance for some parents to discipline their 'little angels' and the absolute cowardice from some senior teachers is the cause of these problems. That combined with the media glorifying airheads such as Kim Kardashian, David McIntosh and Lucy Meck who spend most of their lives taking selfies and going to parties as 'role models' is also to blame for the fact that students (yes, even some from middle and upper class backgrounds) treat the education system and its teachers like pieces of ****.

    Rant over (apologies for any grammatical errors).
    Couldn't help but think of this quote from Matilda!

    'It's a funny thing about mothers and fathers. Even when their own child is the most disgusting little blister you could ever imagine, they still think that he or she is wonderful...
    School teachers suffer a good deal from having to listen to this sort of twaddle from proud parents, but they usually get their own back when the time comes to write the end-of-term reports.
    If I were a teacher...a particularly poisonous little girl might sting me into saying, "Fiona has the same glacial beauty as an iceberg, but unlike the iceberg she has absolutely nothing below the surface."'

    Gotta love Roald Dahl :cool:


    If you were given the chance, is there any other career you'd like to go into? (Don't think I've worded that well)

    Would you ever like to live in a different country? If so, where?
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    (Original post by mrandmr.crane)
    Couldn't help but think of this quote from Matilda!

    'It's a funny thing about mothers and fathers. Even when their own child is the most disgusting little blister you could ever imagine, they still think that he or she is wonderful...
    School teachers suffer a good deal from having to listen to this sort of twaddle from proud parents, but they usually get their own back when the time comes to write the end-of-term reports.
    If I were a teacher...a particularly poisonous little girl might sting me into saying, "Fiona has the same glacial beauty as an iceberg, but unlike the iceberg she has absolutely nothing below the surface."'

    Gotta love Roald Dahl :cool:


    If you were given the chance, is there any other career you'd like to go into? (Don't think I've worded that well)

    Would you ever like to live in a different country? If so, where?
    I would love to be a tennis player. I love Wimbledon. More realistically, I quite fancy doing something related to the army; not necessarily front line but something to help the forces definitely.

    Hungary is a country that fascinates me after I spent a summer there in between my 2nd and 3rd year of university.
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    34 pages...wow...not sure if someone's asked this before, but I don't want to look through every page.

    I'm starting teacher training next week and I guess what I'm most anxious about is the workload. Do you have a good amount of free time still, or do you spent every night and weekends doing work? (this question applies for during the teacher training and then once you've got a job afterwards)
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    34 pages...wow...not sure if someone's asked this before, but I don't want to look through every page.

    I'm starting teacher training next week and I guess what I'm most anxious about is the workload. Do you have a good amount of free time still, or do you spent every night and weekends doing work? (this question applies for during the teacher training and then once you've got a job afterwards)
    It certainly is possible to have weekends free and some free time during the week. It depends on how organised you are and how quickly you work. I'm a bit of a perfectionist so it can take me ages to plan a lesson whereas some people are much quicker.

    I had much less free time when doing my NQT compared to my PGCE.
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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    I was never disruptive but I was disengaged and lazy. I would always do the bare minimum in class and at home. I didn't revise for my GCSEs at all and missed my target grade on every single one, including maths.

    I find it difficult to deal with students like this since their behaviour does not automatically demand attention. They know exactly what they can get away with and will always do just enough work so as not to get a detention. I will tell them that they need to put more effort in when I speak to their parents at parents' evening (assuming that they turn up - my parents never went to a single one). I will comment in their book that they need to up their game and keep an eye on them a bit more in the lesson.

    The trouble is that there's usually something more pressing to deal with in a lesson; someone will be getting ready to throw a plane across the room or someone will be shouting obscenities relating to another student's mother and my attention will go away from the disengaged student who is sitting quietly twiddling his thumbs.
    Again, I'm shocked that teachers have to deal with this sort of thing. What was your home life like as a kid?

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    (Original post by sellerofdreams)
    Again, I'm shocked that teachers have to deal with this sort of thing. What was your home life like as a kid?

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    My needs were met and I lived with my mother and father. Not necessarily the most loving and they never involved themselves in my education but certainly they were hard working and did what they thought was best.
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    one more question - do teachers gossip about students in the staff room? I've always wondered this
 
 
 
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