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    (Original post by beautifulxxx)
    So indirectly, arabs are threaning pak now?
    Edit: And why did the arabs ask Pakistan?

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    Basically, Nawaz Sharif went to Saudi and without taking anyone's advice I.e. Parliament or Pakistans Army, he agreed to send troops to Yemen and provide Saudi with military weapons etc.

    You must realise that Nawaz has a strong interest in Saudi and UAE because when he was exiled he spent a long time in Saudi but more importantly him and his elite corrupt friends have around $30 billion worth of assets in the Arab world hence they can't afford on a personal level to displease the Arabs.

    When he came back to Pakistan, it is highly likely that the Pakistani army gave some signal to Nawaz saying to basically back off the whole Yemen thing. Nawaz sharif had to do this diplomatically and took the case to parliament whereby the majority voted against intervention.

    This puts the elite corrupt in a difficult position now because they fear their assets being seized abroad. UAE knows this and therefore the threat was indirectly apparently to the leaders of Pakistan regarding their personal fortunes because other than that the most they can do is send a few thousand of our workers working there back home which wouldn't be too bad.

    Now the problem is that the Arab nations know that out of all the Muslim nations Pakistan is arguably the strongest in terms of military capability. And many analyst suggest that the UAEs statement was influenced by a third party. Either Saudi, to put pressure on Pakistan. Or Nawaz, to try and win public support to intervene out of fear or something.

    There's a lot more politics in this but that's just a brief summary.


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    (Original post by PPF)
    Basically, Nawaz Sharif went to Saudi and without taking anyone's advice I.e. Parliament or Pakistans Army, he agreed to send troops to Yemen and provide Saudi with military weapons etc.

    You must realise that Nawaz has a strong interest in Saudi and UAE because when he was exiled he spent a long time in Saudi but more importantly him and his elite corrupt friends have around $30 billion worth of assets in the Arab world hence they can't afford on a personal level to displease the Arabs.

    When he came back to Pakistan, it is highly likely that the Pakistani army gave some signal to Nawaz saying to basically back off the whole Yemen thing. Nawaz sharif had to do this diplomatically and took the case to parliament whereby the majority voted against intervention.

    This puts the elite corrupt in a difficult position now because they fear their assets being seized abroad. UAE knows this and therefore the threat was indirectly apparently to the leaders of Pakistan regarding their personal fortunes because other than that the most they can do is send a few thousand of our workers working there back home which wouldn't be too bad.

    Now the problem is that the Arab nations know that out of all the Muslim nations Pakistan is arguably the strongest in terms of military capability. And many analyst suggest that the UAEs statement was influenced by a third party. Either Saudi, to put pressure on Pakistan. Or Nawaz, to try and win public support to intervene out of fear or something.

    There's a lot more politics in this but that's just a brief summary.


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    Oh I see. Very well explained, thank you.
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    (Original post by PPF)
    Basically, Nawaz Sharif went to Saudi and without taking anyone's advice I.e. Parliament or Pakistans Army, he agreed to send troops to Yemen and provide Saudi with military weapons etc.

    You must realise that Nawaz has a strong interest in Saudi and UAE because when he was exiled he spent a long time in Saudi but more importantly him and his elite corrupt friends have around $30 billion worth of assets in the Arab world hence they can't afford on a personal level to displease the Arabs.

    When he came back to Pakistan, it is highly likely that the Pakistani army gave some signal to Nawaz saying to basically back off the whole Yemen thing. Nawaz sharif had to do this diplomatically and took the case to parliament whereby the majority voted against intervention.

    This puts the elite corrupt in a difficult position now because they fear their assets being seized abroad. UAE knows this and therefore the threat was indirectly apparently to the leaders of Pakistan regarding their personal fortunes because other than that the most they can do is send a few thousand of our workers working there back home which wouldn't be too bad.

    Now the problem is that the Arab nations know that out of all the Muslim nations Pakistan is arguably the strongest in terms of military capability. And many analyst suggest that the UAEs statement was influenced by a third party. Either Saudi, to put pressure on Pakistan. Or Nawaz, to try and win public support to intervene out of fear or something.

    There's a lot more politics in this but that's just a brief summary.


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    You sound like an Imran Khan supporter.
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    (Original post by HAnwar)
    You sound like an Imran Khan supporter.
    Not really. Although I think he is the lesser evil I'm not a big fan of PTI.


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    (Original post by PPF)
    Not really. Although I think he is the lesser evil I'm not a big fan of PTI.


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    Same.
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    Shall we get off the politics and back onto the deen? Ya'ani, this discussion won't benefit anyone
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    (Original post by Ruh)
    Shall we get off the politics and back onto the deen? Ya'ani, this discussion won't benefit anyone
    But I haven't even declared jihad on anyone yet :huff:
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    (Original post by HAnwar)
    You sound like an Imran Khan supporter.

    I don't understand people that aren't
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    (Original post by binarythoughts)
    I don't understand people that aren't
    I don't understand people who are.
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    (Original post by Ruh)
    Shall we get off the politics and back onto the deen? Ya'ani, this discussion won't benefit anyone

    Politics is great. It's like teen drama but with countries.
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    (Original post by HAnwar)
    I don't understand people who are.
    You sound like a JUI-F supporter 😜


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    (Original post by HAnwar)
    I don't understand people who are.

    Don't tell me you support Nawaz Sharif...
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    (Original post by binarythoughts)
    Don't tell me you support Nawaz Sharif...
    Bro, let me tell you. Pakistan cannot support a democracy. It needs a military dictatorship like Gen. Musharraf to establish law and order. Once the country is stable and refined I.e. People are educated, have basic necessities and corruption is eliminated only then can you even think of democracy.

    By the way, a new party is going to be announced soon and apparently it will invoke major changes.


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    (Original post by PPF)
    You sound like a JUI-F supporter 😜


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    Lol no thanks.
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    (Original post by binarythoughts)
    Don't tell me you support Nawaz Sharif...
    I agree he's the lesser of two evils.
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    Democracy is overrated. Don't need one to be a successful country.
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    (Original post by PPF)
    Bro, let me tell you. Pakistan cannot support a democracy. It needs a military dictatorship like Gen. Musharraf to establish law and order. Once the country is stable and refined I.e. People are educated, have basic necessities and corruption is eliminated only then can you even think of democracy.

    By the way, a new party is going to be announced soon and apparently it will invoke major changes.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I understand and I am actually a big Musharraf supporter. But in the current circumstances IK is the man.


    Yeah, heard about to that. Looking forward to finding out about it.
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    (Original post by IdeasForLife)
    Democracy is overrated. Don't need one to be a successful country.

    This is something we can agree on.
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    People actually support Musharraf?
    What a vile man.
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    (Original post by HAnwar)
    People actually support Musharraf?
    What a vile man.
    He's not a vile man. He is a great man.
    Don't be too influenced my Maulana Fazlur Rehman who you seem to be a supporter of..😃


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