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    (Original post by faxingstar)
    But its been made very clear from the vote that the age that CAN vote and therefore shouldnt be 'clueless when it comes to politics and making important decisions' 17mil are still clueless enough to vote leave and jepordise this country. If they can be clueless and have a vote, let us 'clueless' younger people vote on the same principle.

    That is not how politics and democracy should work, I mean to even include the votes of children, is going in all sorts of directions.
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    (Original post by PilgrimOfTruth)
    This whole argument/debate is dumb in the extreme. Do kids not realise that those of us who are older, were once 16-18?
    There is absolutely no question whatsoever that when I was 18, I was CLUELESS about how the world worked, how politics worked, who really runs countries, how banksters control everything and how business works. At age 16-18 you are going through a stage in life where emotions run high, dating and relationships are high on the agenda and schools/university is still a key element in your life.

    16-18s year olds, with the very greatest of respect, are not equipped to make decisions like this referendum. They latch onto one or two key ideas and think that's the answer. They have NO experience of the real world at all. Please don't see this as a put down. You guys are very intelligent and switched on but truly, at this stage in your lives, you have no idea what is really going on.
    You are set to enter the stage of life where you will get ripped off by car insurance and finance loans and over the next 5-10 years you will become business savvy and more honed and then you will have more idea of what is going on.

    What happened today was important, for EVERYONE'S future including yours, you just don't realise it yet, and how could you if you are just 16-18yrs old ?! Enjoy life, stop worrying about this stuff and trust your more experienced peers to have done the right thing.
    I'm sorry, but just because this was how you felt at 16 - 18, doesn't mean that all 16 - 18 year olds have little knowledge of politics or business. And they have to live with the consequences - of course we will worry when it affects our future. Also, hindsight belittles memories and feelings, and while it is lovely to remember teenage years as days of wine and roses, it is important to remember that the thoughts and feeling of young people are just as valid as those of adults and the eldery. You say you hadn't got a clue about politics at 18. But at that age, you would have been able to vote. Therefore, surely if clueless 18 year olds can vote, then clueless 16 and 17 year olds should be able to vote too. School and university is the key element of many young people's lives, but this is because it holds such an importance for their future - surely this demonstrates that young people are forward thinking, rather than indicating that they are only concerned with the present. As politics has a direct effect on our education, I would say it is fair for us to want a say in it.

    Also, although I appreciate you did not mean it as a put down, I think that the majority of adults also vote after latching onto a couple of key ideas - it is rare that people really consider all the reasons for voting one way or another. I know that what happened today was important, and as it was important for MY future, I would have liked to have a say in it. I'd prefer not to have to trust other people to make decisions for me - is that not the same argument people used to say that men could vote on the behalf of women, who were supposedly more easily led and less fit to vote? I don't believe that we have done the right thing leaving the EU - this is not because I am ignorant, or frightened, or stupid, or young - this is because through a balanced weighing up of the evidence on both sides, I have come to this conclusion. And my parents trusted me enough to ask me to explain both sides of the argument to them, and to tell them who I would vote for. They said they trusted me to make the decision myself.

    You say 16 - 18 year olds don't realise how important this decision was. Why would I be saying I wish I'd had a vote if I didn't know how important the referendum was? And with all due respect, I think it is essential that 16 - 18 year olds do keep worrying about politics. If they don't worry, they won't ever gain information about politics; they won't ever gain this important life experience; we won't ever have the skills required to vote.

    So this argument isn't dumb, but important. It's important because it's about 16 - 18 year olds wanting to have a say over their future. And it's important because it represents a wave of young people showing an interest in politics and business. If you resent this, you are saying you would prefer a generation of young people to grow up ignorant and uninterested, and personally, I think that is quite a dumb idea.

    I appreciate your views and opinions, even if I don't agree with them. By the way, I'm 15, so even if 16 and 17 year olds had been allowed to vote, I wouldn't have had a say. :-(
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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    disagree really, apart from the right to vote part. 16/17 year olds have grown up in a more liberal and multicultural world, in contrast to the old farts who have ****ed us out of the eu a large number of which would have been bitter about the changing landscape of the UK and living in a 1950's style dream world.

    You cannot argue with the fact that the 16/17 year olds who would have likely wanted to keep us in the eu will now be forced out of it, forced to work outside of it, will have limited employment/travel around Europe and who knows how they're employment opportunities within the UK will now be affected, whilst most of those who have voted us out will spend most of their time under a non-eu UK in retirement.

    The fact that they were denied a vote by more old farts who knew rightly the 16-17 year olds would make a brexit even more unlikely than it was without them is in fact a complete disgrace.

    Sure the old bigots deserved their say just as much as the old non-bigots and the young (non)bigots, but you cannot deny that the effects of this result will be felt much more by those who will be having to find jobs, an education, homes etc etc under a UK without the EU, in my opinion it limits their opportunities and it was limited by people who got their house, job and education while in the EU.

    It was a result deciding decision to strip the youth of their voice, probably more important than any propaganda spurted from either side. If such an important result deciding decision was to be decided in the government, then the referendum itself should have been decided there as well. It should never have been handed to the little Englanders who hate anyone who talks or looks different than they do, that much is certain, and now they've as good broken up the union in my opinion, potentially sent instability to the already dodgy peace in Ireland and generally ****ed countless generations out of a more liberal and free world.
    I completely agree!
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    Surely this wouldn't be a problem if the young voters who can already vote, actually went out and voted?

    I disagree with lowering the voting age. It's a slippery slope but a line has to be drawn somewhere.
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    I think once you reach the age of 18 its very easy to not want the voting age lowered, as you get your say and thats what immediately matters to you.

    My 18th was last week so I just made voting age, obviously my political opinions and morals didnt suddenly change in that time frame. In fact, they've barely changed since I was 16.

    There was such a vast amount of information available online and in newspapers or on television about the referendum, a 16 or 17 year old would've been able to weigh up the two options and make an informed decision as much as the next person.

    As for some of you not wanting younger people to vote as they're "too PC", to me thats just incorrect. Many young people these days are left wing as a reflection of the society we grew up in; exposed more to people of different races, nationalities, sexualities etc. We've become genuinely more accepting than older generations, most are not just acting that way to save face, and to me this can only be a good thing.

    That said, even if 16/17 year olds got to vote I doubt it would've changed the outcome due to numbers. It just wouldve been nice for some of the people who the decision will effect most to have got their say.
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    Well tbh if I was >65 I wouldn't vote, as I'd probably not care. Would hardly affect me, and would affect others much more, so I'll just let them vote.

    Tbh I only know 1 person that voted leave so not a clue how they won
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    If there is a lower bound for the voting age... why shouldn't there be an upper?
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    This just shows how stupid the young ones are. Listen to the middle-aged and elderly, they know what's up.
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    Read this article please.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...g-to-leave-it/
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    Thankfully they didn't. They don't have the facts, the knowledge. So they resort to feelings and fee-fees for their foreign classmates and yada yada as a compass to vote. Wtf?
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    (Original post by 0to100)
    Thankfully they didn't. They don't have the facts, the knowledge. So they resort to feelings and fee-fees for their foreign classmates and yada yada as a compass to vote. Wtf?
    You're glad they didn't vote because they might not have voted the way you wanted. That's not what democracy is. I would have voted on the basis of universities, jobs and travelling.
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    (Original post by Nooglepop)
    You're glad they didn't vote because they might not have voted the way you wanted. That's not what democracy is. I would have voted on the basis of universities, jobs and travelling.
    ...Don't tell me what I'm glad about...:curious:
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    (Original post by Nooglepop)
    You're glad they didn't vote because they might not have voted the way you wanted. That's not what democracy is. I would have voted on the basis of universities, jobs and travelling.
    Oh and "that's not what democracy is?" Haha that's ironic coming from remainers tryna get a 2nd referendum :rolleyes:
    Ya lost. Fair and flippin square
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    (Original post by teenhorrorstory)
    If 16-18 years old were allowed to vote in the referendum, then it's very likely that remain would have actually won. There's a very clear trend that shows how the elderly are very anti EU while the younger people tend to be pro EU. It's very frustrating for me as a 17 year old to see decisions being made by people who will honestly die within the next 10 years while I am unable to have a say. The future belongs to us, the youth.
    Lmao always read the small print, it says at the bottom these entire figures are based on a sample of 1500 people. Highly reliable 👌🏻
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    (Original post by 0to100)
    Oh and "that's not what democracy is?" Haha that's ironic coming from remainers tryna get a 2nd referendum :rolleyes:
    Ya lost. Fair and flippin square
    I didn't lose. I could't vote. I never had a chance of winning. I've never said I wanted a second referendum. The country voted, and while I'm not happy with the decision, I know we can't alter the results just to suit our preferences, so I've not asked for a second referendum. I still would've thought 16 and 17 year olds deserved a vote even if we'd stayed in. I don't think 16 and 17 years should have had a vote because it might have changed the country's decision, but because I think it is fair they get a say in what happens to them.
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    (Original post by Alextaylor6)
    Lmao always read the small print, it says at the bottom these entire figures are based on a sample of 1500 people. Highly reliable 👌🏻
    Exactly what I've said! 1652 people is totally representative... Pfft. I'm glad vote leave won.


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    (Original post by cookie123456789)
    Thank goodness they didn't let 16-18's vote...
    this !!!
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    Elderly people are e ones who have worked hard and contributed to this country. Most 16-20 year olds haven't worked full time and haven't contributed enough to vote. How dare you say that our war heroes, our former politicians, our former civil servants and people who have made a living for themselves and their families and who have shaped this country should not have a right to decide this future.

    In fact, it should be 16-20 year olds who shouldn't be voting. Most of them have never worked full time and have contributed nothing.
    Agreed!
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    https://www.instagram.com/p/BHC1UTyj-SX/
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    As somebody in the 16-18 year old bracket, I do believe that we should have voted in the referendum.
    The simple fact is that we are no more or less swayed by the campaigns than anyone over the age of 18, the only difference may be who we get the information from. Granted we are more likely to get our information from parents or teachers who probably hold a bias view but people over the age of 18 are just as likely to find the information out from their friends, work colleagues or partners who hold an equally bias view.
    At the end of the day it is our future just as much as anyone else living in the country whether they are 18 or 80.
 
 
 
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