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    I'm doing coursework for AS Bio and I was wondering if any of you guys can help me. I'm doing mine on the rate of transpiration of the flowers of a plant.
    My hypothesis is that it will not contribute to the loss of water b/c flowers do not contain stomata.
    How else can I support my hypothesis?
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    (Original post by Heidi)
    I'm doing coursework for AS Bio and I was wondering if any of you guys can help me. I'm doing mine on the rate of transpiration of the flowers of a plant.
    My hypothesis is that it will not contribute to the loss of water b/c flowers do not contain stomata.
    How else can I support my hypothesis?
    Heat increases the rate of transpiration - you can measure this using a potometer and a heat lamp. If your hypothesis is correct, the rate at which the bubble travels up the potometer will be unaffected when a heat lamp is shone on the flower. You can also examine the flower under a microscope and compare it with that of leaf from the same plant... if it's possible to see stomata under a scope - I'm not totally sure as I haven't done it myself. Alternatively you could compare your potometer results with that of a potometer test conducted using the plant itself with the flowers removed. Not sure what you'd use for a control, though. Hope that helped a bit
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    (Original post by madmazda86)
    Heat increases the rate of transpiration - you can measure this using a potometer and a heat lamp. If your hypothesis is correct, the rate at which the bubble travels up the potometer will be unaffected when a heat lamp is shone on the flower. You can also examine the flower under a microscope and compare it with that of leaf from the same plant... if it's possible to see stomata under a scope - I'm not totally sure as I haven't done it myself. Alternatively you could compare your potometer results with that of a potometer test conducted using the plant itself with the flowers removed. Not sure what you'd use for a control, though. Hope that helped a bit
    Thanks for your answer
    I like the micrscope idea.
    The only thing is that I'm not using a potometer for my experiment. What I'm going to do is cover the whole plant with vaseline with the exception of the flowers. And then I would weigh the plant and wait a couple of days and weigh it again. If a change in weight occurs the flowers took part in transpiration if there wasn't any change than they didn't.
 
 
 
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