luae
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Slightly embarrassing question, but I've always had a weak bladder (was a medical issue when I was younger but I 'grew out of it', but it's still not great), if I need to go then I can hold it for 10-15 mins and then I'd be doing the loo dance in front of the class. What are the 'rules' on going to the loo when teaching? I'm worried that I'd be bursting, but unable to leave a class of (primary-aged) pupils on their own
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beautifulbigmacs
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Good blummun question! You're not alone in wondering this. I've got ibs.
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Sarah1986H
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I have noticed by observing in a few schools recently that teachers are superhuman and do not go all day!!

I have no idea how they manage it - I make sure I go at break and lunch time and that seems to help
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Mr M
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(Original post by luae)
Slightly embarrassing question, but I've always had a weak bladder (was a medical issue when I was younger but I 'grew out of it', but it's still not great), if I need to go then I can hold it for 10-15 mins and then I'd be doing the loo dance in front of the class. What are the 'rules' on going to the loo when teaching? I'm worried that I'd be bursting, but unable to leave a class of (primary-aged) pupils on their own
You can't leave a class unattended to use the toilet. You *might* be allowed if you have a teaching assistant or another adult in the room.
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Mr M
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(Original post by editedtoprotecttheinnocent)
Yes it wouldn't be acceptable to leave a class unattended - I'm worried about being in the situation where I couldn't leave them unattended but seriously needed to get to a bathroom. I guess I'll just have to time my water intake strategically.
You need to use the toilet immediately before school and at every break * and just drink enough to keep hydrated during the day.

* even this can be difficult if you are on duty
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thecatwithnohat
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You're not meant to leave your class unattended. I'd understand if they were kids in Year 5+ but younger? :no:
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Amy. J S
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I pretty much agree with everyone else. If the children were older, say 10+, then maybe it wouldn't be seen as much of a problem. But with young children, you really can't leave them unattended. I think you may just have to monitor what you're drinking, and use the toilet as frequently as you possibly can during out-of-class hours.
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luae
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For clarification, I completely agree that I couldn't leave a class unattended! I guess I wasn't really sure what I was asking with this thread as I know there is no way round it apart from having another adult in the room - I suppose I was just hoping for advice from people who may have experienced similar! Thanks for all advice, monitoring water intake and timing it right does seem to be the only sensible solution.
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myrtille
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You couldn't leave the class unattended with primary pupils, buf you have a teaching assistant in the room with you, I don't see that it would be a huge problem to nip out on the odd occasion when you really have to. Obviously it would be preferable not to (by going before lessons/break/lunch, and not drinking loads) but if the pupils are safely supervised it's not a major issue if it's an occasional necessity.

In secondary I know some teachers would - I have colleagues who nip and make themselves a coffee while pupils are working if they have a well-behaved class.

Personally I have no problem with nipping out to get some equipment from the nearby storeroom or borrow some textbooks from another classroom, but I don't go to the toilet or to make hot drinks during lessons, partly because pupils aren't allowed to so it seems rather unfair, and partly because I'm generally rather busy. Those 50-minute sessions are the most important part of my job so I don't spend them out of the classroom or sitting at my desk sending emails.

The advantage in secondary is that we have lesson changeover every 50 minutes, so if I'm desperate I'll lock my door, run to the loo (which is on my corridor, so very close) and make the next class wait a minute before starting their lesson.
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student2312
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If our teachers at primary school needed to leave the classroom for a minute, often what they would do is tell us the teacher next door will be keeping an eye on us, leave the classroom door open and ask the teachers to keep an eye on both classes.
Again this is more suitable for older children, the youngest I remember this happening was P4/5 but it could be an option depending on school policy and the age of the kids.
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Angelil
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I go at break and lunch if I can manage it but there are plenty of times when I can't go all day. But then again a) I don't have any medical problems of this nature and b) I teach secondary so if I were really busting it probably wouldn't hurt to pop out. I suppose if you teach primary you just have to pace yourself: go before the children arrive, go at break, go at lunch, and then go again the second the children have gone. If you have no medical problems then this should be more than enough opportunities. If you do have medical problems then I'd imagine there can be little the school can do. In any case, many classrooms have teaching assistants now (NB I have never had access to a teaching assistant in my career, for what it's worth), so you wouldn't be leaving the children completely without supervision.
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Mr M
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(Original post by myrtille)
In secondary I know some teachers would - I have colleagues who nip and make themselves a coffee while pupils are working if they have a well-behaved class.
This would result in a written warning in many schools.
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myrtille
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(Original post by Mr M)
This would result in a written warning in many schools.
Gosh, I've clearly just worked in some very lax schools.

My HoD on my 2nd PGCE placement used to do this a lot, and teachers at my 1st placement would nip out to do photocopying for another lesson (which seems worryingly disorganised - surely you can do all your photocopying at the start of the day if you need any?).

Perhaps it's a rural thing?
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Mr M
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(Original post by myrtille)
Gosh, I've clearly just worked in some very lax schools.

My HoD on my 2nd PGCE placement used to do this a lot, and teachers at my 1st placement would nip out to do photocopying for another lesson (which seems worryingly disorganised - surely you can do all your photocopying at the start of the day if you need any?).

Perhaps it's a rural thing?
Imagine a fight broke out and someone was injured. The parents would certainly demand your dismissal. Not worth the risk even if your SLT turn a collective blind eye.
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rachel.h
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(Original post by Mr M)
This would result in a written warning in many schools.
This.

I wouldn't dare leave a class unattended unless it were an emergency. I work in a great school where the kids would be fine, but I wouldn't do it.
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