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    Hello guys! I wonder if there are any OU Mathematicians out there that could help me with deciding on my last Level 3 module.

    I am currently pursing the BSc Mathematics degree and my intention is either to somehow find a job in aerospace engineering right away or to obtain a Master's degree in aerospace engineering from a different university. Has anyone been in a similar situation?

    For my last year, so far I've chosen

    - Mathematical methods and fluid mechanics
    - Deterministic and stochastic dynamics
    - The quantum world (only because I really enjoy the subject).

    For my last module, I'm having trouble deciding between
    - Graphs, networks and design
    - Optimization
    - Electromagnetism.

    I'm not really sure which one would be the best option for me. I'm not a big fan of electromagnetism, though, so I would prefer not to take it.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks in advance.
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    Do you have a reason for ruling out complex analysis? There was a whole unit on fluid flows. I've no idea how relevant it is to your own ambitions but it might (?) help with QM too, and other engineery stuff.

    I haven't done any of the courses you mention. MT365 is generally well-regarded as a 'first' L3 maths module and might be a good choice for a decent score or relief from your other modules if you find that to be the case. Optimization sounds like a better fit but I don't know much about it.
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    (Original post by sputum)
    Do you have a reason for ruling out complex analysis? There was a whole unit on fluid flows. I've no idea how relevant it is to your own ambitions but it might (?) help with QM too, and other engineery stuff.

    I haven't done any of the courses you mention. MT365 is generally well-regarded as a 'first' L3 maths module and might be a good choice for a decent score or relief from your other modules if you find that to be the case. Optimization sounds like a better fit but I don't know much about it.
    Thanks so much for your reply!

    From its description, Complex Analysis seems to be more of a pure maths module and the material it covers is not something I greatly enjoyed in M208. That's what put me off it primarily. But also, it seems to me that some of the other modules might be better suited to my needs/interests.

    I do like the sound of MT365, although I'm still not entirely sure about the whole thing. I think I'm going to call my Student Support Team to see what they can recommend for me. Thanks again!
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    Hi, I did both MT365 and M373 for my BSc Maths. Like you, I was looking to do more applied maths modules.

    Optimization is probably more practical for you since presumably within aerospace engineering there's quite a bit of modelling. It uses a computer package which some people hated but I quite enjoyed. It can be a little repetitive but the fundamental stuff is really interesting. I enjoyed it.

    MT365 is fun and relatively easy to get a good mark in, interesting but probably not as relevant. No calculus at all as far as I remember!

    Feel free to ask questions...
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    (Original post by elw71)
    Hi, I did both MT365 and M373 for my BSc Maths. Like you, I was looking to do more applied maths modules.

    Optimization is probably more practical for you since presumably within aerospace engineering there's quite a bit of modelling. It uses a computer package which some people hated but I quite enjoyed. It can be a little repetitive but the fundamental stuff is really interesting. I enjoyed it.

    MT365 is fun and relatively easy to get a good mark in, interesting but probably not as relevant. No calculus at all as far as I remember!

    Feel free to ask questions...
    Hi, thanks for your response! What else did you study alongside those two modules? And what is MT365 like, in detail?

    Optimization seems like a good module to take. But now I'm thinking that perhaps I should drop QM and do something else instead.
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    Hi, my level 3 modules were MT365, MST326, M373, MS324 and S330 (Oceanography). MS324 is no longer offered, luckily for you as it's a pig ;-) All the rest I enjoyed.

    MT365 was split fairly evenly into thirds - Graphs, Networks and Design. The text below is from the course description, and is much better than any description I can give.

    I particularly enjoyed the network flows, code design, branching and critical paths sections. Kinematic design was the hardest for me. There's honestly nothing nasty about it, it's interesting and varied. From memory TMAs and the exam are fine if you've put the work in; nothing horrible to surprise you. I think the main criticism from others was that there wasn't much connection between the 3 areas, so it can feel a bit as though you are studying three mini-modules.

    Graphs 1: Graphs and digraphs discusses graphs and digraphs in general, and describes the use of graph theory in genetics, ecology and music, and of digraphs in the social sciences. We discuss Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs and related problems; one of these is the well-known Königsberg bridges problem.

    Networks 1: Network flows is concerned with the problem of finding the maximum amount of a commodity (gas, water, passengers) that can pass between two points of a network in a given time. We give an algorithm for solving this problem, and discuss important variations that frequently arise in practice.

    Design 1: Geometric design, concerned with geometric configurations, discusses two-dimensional patterns such as tiling patterns, and the construction and properties of regular and semi-regular tilings, and of polyominoes and polyhedra.

    Graphs 2: Trees Trees are graphs occurring in areas such as branching processes, decision procedures and the representation of molecules. After discussing their mathematical properties we look at their applications, such as the minimum connector problem and the travelling salesman problem.

    Networks 2: Optimal paths How does an engineering manager plan a complex project encompassing many activities? This application of graph theory is called ‘critical path planning’. It is one of the class of problems in which the shortest or longest paths in a graph or digraph must be found.

    Design 2: Kinematic design The mechanical design of table lamps, robot manipulators, car suspension systems, space-frame structures and other artefacts depends on the interconnection of systems of rigid bodies. This unit discusses the contribution of combinatorial ideas to this area of engineering design.

    Graphs 3: Planarity and colouring When can a graph be drawn in the plane without crossings? Is it possible to colour the countries of any map with just four colours so that neighbouring countries have different colours? These are two of several apparently unrelated problems considered in this unit.

    Networks 3: Assignment and transportation If there are ten applicants for ten jobs and each is suitable for only a few jobs, is it possible to fill all the jobs? If a manufacturer supplies several warehouses with a product made in several factories, how can the warehouses be supplied at the least cost? These problems of the system-management type are answered in this unit.

    Design 3: Design of codes Redundant information in a communication system can be used to overcome problems of imperfect reception. This section discusses the properties of certain codes that arise in practice, in particular cyclic codes and Hamming codes, and some codes used in space probes.

    Graphs 4: Graphs and computing describes some important uses of graphs in computer science, such as depth-first and breadth-first search, quad trees, and the knapsack and travelling salesman problems.

    Networks 4: Physical networks Graph theory provides a unifying method for studying the current through an electrical network or water flow through pipes. This unit describes the graphical representation of such networks.

    Design 4: Block designs If an agricultural research station wants to test different varieties of a crop, how can a field be designed to minimise bias due to variations in the soil? The answer lies in block designs. This unit explains the concepts of balanced and resolvable designs and gives methods for constructing block designs.

    Conclusion In this unit, many of the ideas and problems encountered in the module are reviewed, showing how they can be generalised and extended, and the progress made in finding solutions is discussed.

    Hope this helps!
 
 
 
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