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    Generally speaking, you use accusative for verbs with movement (ich ging in das Haus) and for the direct object of verbs Dative is used when you want to say 'to' something - (ich gab das Buch meinem Bruder).
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Quoting myself in case my question was missed :redface:
    I'm pretty sure I answered that question, actually.:confused: Anyway: yes, any decent dictionary should tell you the correct case; those which don't include that information aren't really worth getting. There are a couple of general rules, but overall, it'll be easier if you just learn the cases along with the verbs. It doesn't require a lot of extra effort, and it's easier than trying to work it out afterwards (and getting it wrong).
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    Hi wtid,
    most verbs take the accusative case and only a few the dative. I really don't know if those have any recognizable specifics to identify them. When children learn the cases in school they do it by asking those questions "wen oder was" for accusative, "wem" for dative and "wessen" for genitive, but this doesn't make sense since you don't have a dative.
    Is there a difference concerning the object between "The teacher praises his student" which in German takes the accusative "Der Lehrer lobt seinen Schüler" and "The son obeys his father"
    which takes the dative "Der Sohn gehorcht seinem Vater"?
    Hm, I don't know. Here's a list of verbs that take the dative: absagen-ich muss ihm absagen-I have to turn him down, ähneln-sie ähnelt ihrer Mutter-she resembles her mother, antworten-er antwortet dem Lehrer-he answers (to?) the teacher, begegnen, beistehen, beitreten, danken, dienen, drohen, einfallen, entgegen kommen, fehlen, folgen, gefallen, gehorchen, gehören, gelingen, genügen, glauben, gratulieren, gut tun, helfen, missfallen, sich nähern, nachlaufen, nützen, passen, passieren, platzen, raten, sich schaden, schmecken, vertrauen, verzeihen, weh tun, widersprechen, zuhören, zustimmen
    Take the sentence "Peter weint" which is a complete sentence and compare it to "Peter begegnet" which is missing something. If you ask (in German) for the missing part, you ask "Wem begegnet Peter?" ihm, dem Vater, der Mutter, seiner Freundin.
    I guess you have to learn it by heart which case follows a verb, because I think there are no rules.
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    Oh Mann, bin ich froh, dass Deutsch meine Muttersprache ist und ich es nicht als Fremdsprache erlernen muss. Ich habe ein altes Grammatikbuch hervorgekramt und darin gelesen.
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    I'm writing a letter to my employer for my year abroad and just wondered how you say, "declare a disability" in German please?
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    Hi hannah_dru,
    do you mean permanently or temporarily disabled?
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    Permanently disabled.
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    Eine Behinderung angeben
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    Thank you grizzlybaer!
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    does anyone else here who isn't a native german speaker set their facebook language to german?
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    Hallo von Deutschland :awesome:. Ich bin nun gestorben haha.
    Last night we went to club here in the town, and despite the tosser of a bouncer, had a good time. Though my head hurt this morning :p:. Todaz we went to München and the driver, who has never been to Germany before, got us lost. So it took him 3 hours to get there, when it should have only taken around 1 hour :shifty:. But there was a fair on, and all the boy bought a wooden sword or bow and arrow and started to have a fight outside the cathedral, everyone just sort of stared at us haha.
    At first it was difficult, with the language I mean. One minute we are on the coach talking in English and the next I am listening to nothing but German - quite literally. But hey, I am here to improve my German :p:.
    Tonight we are going to a houseparty then on Monday night we are going to another club in the town. Haha, and I imagine the group will have something planned for Wednesday night as it is our last night. Last night some of the other English students went to the supermarket and bought alcohol (they are only 16, it was strange) and went and sat in a carpark and got drunk, is this even sociabally acceptable? The alcohol is so cheap here, i think i shall have to hoard some back with me .
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Viel Spass! Wo fahrst du in Deutschland? Bist du schon gewesen? Es ist noch 1 Monat Heute, bis ich fliege, aber nur 1 und Halb Wochen bis ihre Eltern kommen also dann kann ich mehr Deutsch sprechen

    When using cases, I can't work out which to use when there's no clue (i.e prepositions) and I just have to think "is the action been done for X or to X" or whatever. Friederike said each verb takes a specific case (I think I already mentioned this), but my small dictionary doesn't list which. Would a better dictionary give tell me which case the verb takes?
    Ich fahre nach Unna, in Nord-Rhein-Westfalian (sp?). Und gleich falls!
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    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
    Ich fahre nach Unna, in Nord-Rhein-Westfalian (sp?). Und gleich falls!
    It's Nordrhein-Westfalen
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    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
    Hallo von Deutschland :awesome:. Ich bin nun gestorben haha.
    Last night we went to club here in the town, and despite the tosser of a bouncer, had a good time. Though my head hurt this morning :p:. Todaz we went to München and the driver, who has never been to Germany before, got us lost. So it took him 3 hours to get there, when it should have only taken around 1 hour :shifty:. But there was a fair on, and all the boy bought a wooden sword or bow and arrow and started to have a fight outside the cathedral, everyone just sort of stared at us haha.
    At first it was difficult, with the language I mean. One minute we are on the coach talking in English and the next I am listening to nothing but German - quite literally. But hey, I am here to improve my German :p:.
    Tonight we are going to a houseparty then on Monday night we are going to another club in the town. Haha, and I imagine the group will have something planned for Wednesday night as it is our last night. Last night some of the other English students went to the supermarket and bought alcohol (they are only 16, it was strange) and went and sat in a carpark and got drunk, is this even sociabally acceptable? The alcohol is so cheap here, i think i shall have to hoard some back with me .
    I'm going to Munich soon, but I'm worried it's going to be very expensive because of the exchange rates now. Have you noticed it to be pretty bad?
    You say the alcohol is cheap though which is great news! xD
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    (Original post by Joly)
    I'm going to Munich soon, but I'm worried it's going to be very expensive because of the exchange rates now. Have you noticed it to be pretty bad?
    You say the alcohol is cheap though which is great news! xD
    Erm, I found shoes were quite expensive in comparison to England's prices, but overall, I'd say it was just the same as England as far as clothes and "things" go. I did pick up a bottle of Baileys for 5 euros though (the big one), which i am very proud of haha.
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    (Original post by Joly)
    I'm going to Munich soon, but I'm worried it's going to be very expensive because of the exchange rates now. Have you noticed it to be pretty bad?
    You say the alcohol is cheap though which is great news! xD
    The exchange rate makes things really expensive, I found at Christmas. Just 1 example, a Starbucks medium dark cherry mocha was £3 here at Christmas. I went over there and it was like €5! The exchange rate, being so bad, meant that it converted to about £4.25! I also bought a jacket over there which cost €120, with the price in £s listed as £70. It was more like £110! I hope it comes down a bit by the time I go at Easter, or I'll be very poor (my girlfriends birthday whilst I'm over there and she wants to go to a cocktail bar and the cocktails are about €10 each :tongue:)
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    Hallo =)

    I want to improve my German...at the moment it is really bad =(
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    I'm going to Munich in July for a year. At least I think Geisenhausen is pretty close to Munich. I've also heard it's expensive which really isn't good for a poor person like me! I've already started to save up. I'm thinking to exchange my money when I get there as the pound to a euro is rubbish value right now.
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    @SpiritedAway
    Well, I'd say that it is kind of 'socially accepted' (or better: socially tolerated ) to have some drinks at a public place. In fact, a lot of young people do that. We don't know 'Alcohol Control Zones', you can't commit an offence for being drunk or stuff like that. You can just drink everywhere you want to as long as you behave like a human being. So don't be too loud, don't offend any pedestrians and everything will be fine.

    The exchange rate is wicked, yes. I paid my tuition fees for my British University in December and it was just so cheap... Of course, if you go abroad you pay a lot more at the moment which is really annoying. Just try not to think about the exchange rate too much, it'll make you nuts.
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    (Original post by Kim08)
    Hallo =)

    I want to improve my German...at the moment it is really bad =(
    Warum? Gehst du nach Deutschland oder was?
 
 
 
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