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    I'm thinking of studying overseas, I really just want to gtfo of the UK for a bit.

    I'd really like to go to somewhere like HK, Singapore, Japan or Korea. However the problem with these places is money, either the cost of living or the fees or a combo of both (eg Singapore will cost about £10k now (thanks breixteers) and is expensive to live also, so basically, impossible to study there).

    Places like Malaysia are more financially possible, but I'm concerned about the overall rep. of their unis. QS gives one in the top 150 in the world, higher than the uni I am at in the UK, while the same uni doesn't even feature on THE. So I have no idea if it is good or terrible.

    I also looked at a joint Mahidol (Thailand) and UCL degree. It's about £16k for 2 MSc which is a push but at least it has that UCL shine.

    Would anyone be able to give any advice regarding studying in Asia?

    I know a lot of Asians will come from places like MY etc to the UK as it is a better system. I'm not trying to get a 'better' degree. I'm trying to get a better experience, but at the same time come out with a degree that is worth something decent.
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    What is your subject, i assume you want courses taught in English?
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    (Original post by Tcannon)
    What is your subject, i assume you want courses taught in English?
    Probably will be in materials science/engineering or related, or computer science (my undergrad was a fairly general NatSci so I've got a lot of flexibility). Computer science options are more limited as I've not done too many comp sci courses and UK seems to be unique in the MSc Comp.Sci without having computing experience, though as I have some computing under my belt I'm able to apply for a handful such as the course at Mahidol.

    And yes, will have to be in English. Though most university courses I've seen in Asia are taught in English anyway.
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    For MSc in science/engineering, you will be fine as most courses are taught in English and many profs are trained in the US, UK. I think there is more funding in STEM than in arts. Japan, China and Taiwan have Master's scholarships for international students covering full tuition plus stipends. I have seen mostly only PhD studentships for unis in HK, not familiar with Singapore. Brunei grants generous scholarships to internationals.
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    (Original post by Tcannon)
    For MSc in science/engineering, you will be fine as most courses are taught in English and many profs are trained in the US, UK. I think there is more funding in STEM than in arts. Japan, China and Taiwan have Master's scholarships for international students covering full tuition plus stipends. I have seen mostly only PhD studentships for unis in HK, not familiar with Singapore. Brunei grants generous scholarships to internationals.
    Scholarships is actually one thing I haven't looked into. At the time of application I tend not to consider them when working out costs due to being hard to get (an opinion formed by scholarship experience in the UK as a home student). Those you mention in Japan etc, what sort of criteria do they take into account when awarding scholarships?
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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    Scholarships is actually one thing I haven't looked into. At the time of application I tend not to consider them when working out costs due to being hard to get (an opinion formed by scholarship experience in the UK as a home student). Those you mention in Japan etc, what sort of criteria do they take into account when awarding scholarships?
    http://www.uk.emb-japan.go.jp/itpr_e..._postgrad.html
    Some well funded Japanese unis (Tokyo, Kyoto, Waseda, Keio) grant separately MSc scholarships
    I just noticed that the £ has lost 33% against most Asian currencies in the past 12 months. Ouch
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    (Original post by Tcannon)
    http://www.uk.emb-japan.go.jp/itpr_e..._postgrad.html
    Some well funded Japanese unis (Tokyo, Kyoto, Waseda, Keio) grant separately MSc scholarships
    I just noticed that the £ has lost 33% against most Asian currencies in the past 12 months. Ouch
    Aye, dem Brexiteers really trashed it

    I checked out NTU (Singapore), not much going on there in terms of scholarships, seem to heavily favour PhDs, research masters and APAC or ASEAN nationals when it comes to international students for MSc but dissertation. They do offer about $SGD8000 off the fees though, the catch is you have to stay and work in Singapore for 3 years afterwards. Its nice they'd just dish out a visa like that and all, but I'm not sure I could commit 4 years there or not.
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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    I'm thinking of studying overseas, I really just want to gtfo of the UK for a bit.

    I'd really like to go to somewhere like HK, Singapore, Japan or Korea. However the problem with these places is money, either the cost of living or the fees or a combo of both (eg Singapore will cost about £10k now (thanks breixteers) and is expensive to live also, so basically, impossible to study there).

    Places like Malaysia are more financially possible, but I'm concerned about the overall rep. of their unis. QS gives one in the top 150 in the world, higher than the uni I am at in the UK, while the same uni doesn't even feature on THE. So I have no idea if it is good or terrible.

    I also looked at a joint Mahidol (Thailand) and UCL degree. It's about £16k for 2 MSc which is a push but at least it has that UCL shine.

    Would anyone be able to give any advice regarding studying in Asia?

    I know a lot of Asians will come from places like MY etc to the UK as it is a better system. I'm not trying to get a 'better' degree. I'm trying to get a better experience, but at the same time come out with a degree that is worth something decent.
    Mahidol is a really good uni and is recognised internationally - it currently holds the top spot in Thailand and I think it's 3rd in South-East Asia, the first 2 spots going to Singapore.
    I'm actually applying to Mahidol too for a September start to study Biomedical Science

    I'd definitely go for it. It's easy to travel to anywhere in Thailand and a few places all over Asia as it's close to Bangkok (if you're at the Salaya campus). The living costs are really cheap (about £160 a month) and for food, you'd spend no more than 150 Baht (roughly £3.50) on 3 meals including drinks each day, and that's going all out! Don't think about cooking anything yourself though as it'll end up more costly than buying out.

    If you're at the Bangkok campus it's just as easy to find cheap accommodation although it will obviously cost slightly more being in the big city. Try and get a condo close to the uni as the traffic is ridiculous at peak times and you really don't want to be stuck in it while heading to classes or even going home after a long day.

    Also, small tip: I'm not sure if postgraduates are required to wear uniform, but if you do end up having to, wear it after class too! When Thais see you in a uniform they'll charge you local prices rather than foreigner prices which can often be 4x as much
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    (Original post by Ninjasrule)
    Mahidol is a really good uni and is recognised internationally - it currently holds the top spot in Thailand and I think it's 3rd in South-East Asia, the first 2 spots going to Singapore.
    I'm actually applying to Mahidol too for a September start to study Biomedical Science

    I'd definitely go for it. It's easy to travel to anywhere in Thailand and a few places all over Asia as it's close to Bangkok (if you're at the Salaya campus). The living costs are really cheap (about £160 a month) and for food, you'd spend no more than 150 Baht (roughly £3.50) on 3 meals including drinks each day, and that's going all out! Don't think about cooking anything yourself though as it'll end up more costly than buying out.

    If you're at the Bangkok campus it's just as easy to find cheap accommodation although it will obviously cost slightly more being in the big city. Try and get a condo close to the uni as the traffic is ridiculous at peak times and you really don't want to be stuck in it while heading to classes or even going home after a long day.

    Also, small tip: I'm not sure if postgraduates are required to wear uniform, but if you do end up having to, wear it after class too! When Thais see you in a uniform they'll charge you local prices rather than foreigner prices which can often be 4x as much
    I just applied on Thursday night, narrowly missed the deadline, given the time difference I was lucky to have a really good referee who sent off the reference right away.

    I have to say though, I'm not particularly hopeful that I will be given a place. I've applied for the Computing Science track, they have requirements of at least 6 computer sci related modules, when I spoke to the admissions tutor they told me that my maths modules would count as computing. However I'm not convinced they will regard them as such. I've applied now anyway, so all I can do now is wait and hope.

    How familiar are you with the application process? Looks to me like they take you take pre-entry exams, they also asked me to provide evidence of English proficiency even though I'm a native speaker.

    Are you applying for postgraduate study or undergrad?
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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    I just applied on Thursday night, narrowly missed the deadline, given the time difference I was lucky to have a really good referee who sent off the reference right away.

    I have to say though, I'm not particularly hopeful that I will be given a place. I've applied for the Computing Science track, they have requirements of at least 6 computer sci related modules, when I spoke to the admissions tutor they told me that my maths modules would count as computing. However I'm not convinced they will regard them as such. I've applied now anyway, so all I can do now is wait and hope.

    How familiar are you with the application process? Looks to me like they take you take pre-entry exams, they also asked me to provide evidence of English proficiency even though I'm a native speaker.

    Are you applying for postgraduate study or undergrad?
    Ohh, they might still accept your application. From the few times that I've spoken to the admissions team, they've been very accommodating. Maybe give them a call as soon as you can just to check?

    They will count. In all undergraduate science degrees in Thailand you're required to take a lot of maths classes so don't worry about it.

    I'm not too familiar with postgraduate application process but I imagine it's pretty similar to the undergraduate application.

    With regards to submitting English proficiency scores, you might be exempt as a native speaker according to this page:
    http://www.ict.mahidol.ac.th/admissi...tions-msc.html

    If not, it only takes an hour to do the TOEFL ITP (Mahidol does a shortened version of it I believe).
    You'll also take entrance exams in maths & English on the same day - required from all applicants regardless of where you come from. Then a month or so later, you'll have an interview depending on whether or not you passed the entrance exams.

    It is a lengthy process so if you're not up for that then don't bother. But I warning you now, most Asian universities have a similar application process.
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    (Original post by Ninjasrule)
    Ohh, they might still accept your application. From the few times that I've spoken to the admissions team, they've been very accommodating. Maybe give them a call as soon as you can just to check?

    They will count. In all undergraduate science degrees in Thailand you're required to take a lot of maths classes so don't worry about it.

    I'm not too familiar with postgraduate application process but I imagine it's pretty similar to the undergraduate application.

    With regards to submitting English proficiency scores, you might be exempt as a native speaker according to this page:
    http://www.ict.mahidol.ac.th/admissi...tions-msc.html

    If not, it only takes an hour to do the TOEFL ITP (Mahidol does a shortened version of it I believe).
    You'll also take entrance exams in maths & English on the same day - required from all applicants regardless of where you come from. Then a month or so later, you'll have an interview depending on whether or not you passed the entrance exams.

    It is a lengthy process so if you're not up for that then don't bother. But I warning you now, most Asian universities have a similar application process.
    Where can I take the exams do you know?
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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    Where can I take the exams do you know?
    You'll most likely take them at the college you've applied to. I'm not sure if they'll allow you to take them at home at a local exam centre, but it might be worth asking if you're worried about travel costs.
    Otherwise, it gives you a couple of extra months to travel

    To get a student visa (1-year) you'll have to leave the country, but you can apply at any Thai embassy/consulate. You won't have to go too far as you apply from:
    • Cambodia (Phnom Penh)
    • Laos (Vientiane)
    • Myanmar (Yangoon)
    • Malaysia ( Penang )

    The first 3(?) times you enter Thailand (in any single year) without a student visa, you'll get a one month on arrival visa which you don't have to apply for. So use that for the entrance exam & interview.
    If you stay over the 30 day limit don't worry too much but don't get into trouble with the police either. For every day that you overstay you'll also have to pay a 500 baht fine.
    Bear in mind that once you've used up one of these months, you'll have to leave for a couple of days, either on foot or by air. This is mostly because travellers were abusing the system so they've made it slightly more awkward for people to re-enter.
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    (Original post by Ninjasrule)
    You'll most likely take them at the college you've applied to. I'm not sure if they'll allow you to take them at home at a local exam centre, but it might be worth asking if you're worried about travel costs.
    Otherwise, it gives you a couple of extra months to travel

    To get a student visa (1-year) you'll have to leave the country, but you can apply at any Thai embassy/consulate. You won't have to go too far as you apply from:
    • Cambodia (Phnom Penh)
    • Laos (Vientiane)
    • Myanmar (Yangoon)
    • Malaysia ( Penang )

    The first 3(?) times you enter Thailand (in any single year) without a student visa, you'll get a one month on arrival visa which you don't have to apply for. So use that for the entrance exam & interview.
    If you stay over the 30 day limit don't worry too much but don't get into trouble with the police either. For every day that you overstay you'll also have to pay a 500 baht fine.
    Bear in mind that once you've used up one of these months, you'll have to leave for a couple of days, either on foot or by air. This is mostly because travellers were abusing the system so they've made it slightly more awkward for people to re-enter.
    I don't really mind travelling to take the tests, however the dates of the test (if it is in Thailand) will probably be an issue. I'm still doing my undergrad, so I don't actually finish until June, after then I am starting a 6 week internship. It said on their website that the deadline was 03/03/17 and then there are exams later this month? No way I'd be able to make those, let alone afford a last minute flight just for exams :/ I'm hoping there will be some way to work around it.
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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    I don't really mind travelling to take the tests, however the dates of the test (if it is in Thailand) will probably be an issue. I'm still doing my undergrad, so I don't actually finish until June, after then I am starting a 6 week internship. It said on their website that the deadline was 03/03/17 and then there are exams later this month? No way I'd be able to make those, let alone afford a last minute flight just for exams :/ I'm hoping there will be some way to work around it.
    Ahh, I see. In that case, definitely call them up asap (they're 7 hours ahead so you'll probably have to call at 3am here to successfully get through), explain your predicament and ask if they'll scan/send the tests over to your current university and do the interview over Skype
    It is better that you go over so that you get a feel for the place but under your circumstances it's understandable to stay in the UK.
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    (Original post by Ninjasrule)
    Ahh, I see. In that case, definitely call them up asap (they're 7 hours ahead so you'll probably have to call at 3am here to successfully get through), explain your predicament and ask if they'll scan/send the tests over to your current university and do the interview over Skype
    It is better that you go over so that you get a feel for the place but under your circumstances it's understandable to stay in the UK.
    Did you apply in the end? Heard anything back?
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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    Did you apply in the end? Heard anything back?
    I'm applying in July while I'm in Thailand - I'm applying to them as a home student, which I can't do yet as all of my Thai ID expired years ago. :')

    How about you, have you heard back?
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    (Original post by Ninjasrule)
    I'm applying in July while I'm in Thailand - I'm applying to them as a home student, which I can't do yet as all of my Thai ID expired years ago. :'

    How about you, have you heard back?
    Ah I didn't realise you were from Thailand. Jealous you can get around the international fees.

    I had an interview yesterday, and it seemed to go quite well. However I'm still not entirely convinced it would be the best option due to the price. There's a chance I can split the 2 years and do a year at Mahidol, then UCL and get 2 degrees, one from each. There's also a chance I could get a scholarship to cover 60-70% of the fees (if I get a 3.7-4gpa in the first semester). However, I could also end up with no funding and have to pay about £11k from my own pocket. I know Mahidol is a good uni, but for that money there are cheaper courses at much better ones (ie most of the UK unis where I'd also get funding), HK, Singapore, Japan. If I was able to pay the home fees that'd be prefect and I'd be there in a heart beat. But now that it seems more of a realistic possibility, the financial question is creeping in.
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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    Ah I didn't realise you were from Thailand. Jealous you can get around the international fees.

    I had an interview yesterday, and it seemed to go quite well. However I'm still not entirely convinced it would be the best option due to the price. There's a chance I can split the 2 years and do a year at Mahidol, then UCL and get 2 degrees, one from each. There's also a chance I could get a scholarship to cover 60-70% of the fees (if I get a 3.7-4gpa in the first semester). However, I could also end up with no funding and have to pay about £11k from my own pocket. I know Mahidol is a good uni, but for that money there are cheaper courses at much better ones (ie most of the UK unis where I'd also get funding), HK, Singapore, Japan. If I was able to pay the home fees that'd be prefect and I'd be there in a heart beat. But now that it seems more of a realistic possibility, the financial question is creeping in.
    Yeah, my mum's Thai. For undergraduate there's only about £1000 difference per year anyway. But I know postgraduate can get a bit pricey.

    Ah, I'm glad it went well! Did they conduct the interview over Skype?
    I'm sorry you feel that way. Isn't there anything you can get from SFE? A 3.7-4.0 gpa for the first semester should be achievable if you work hard. They'll realise that everyone's adjusting so you'll probably be covering stuff that you've already done anyway. Also, if possible, pick your classes for that first semester wisely - take one or two "difficult" classes and have the rest as "easy" classes.

    How does the scholarship work at UCL, as I imagine that would be the bulk of your costs (especially with accommodation)?
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    (Original post by Ninjasrule)
    Yeah, my mum's Thai. For undergraduate there's only about £1000 difference per year anyway. But I know postgraduate can get a bit pricey.

    Ah, I'm glad it went well! Did they conduct the interview over Skype?
    I'm sorry you feel that way. Isn't there anything you can get from SFE? A 3.7-4.0 gpa for the first semester should be achievable if you work hard. They'll realise that everyone's adjusting so you'll probably be covering stuff that you've already done anyway. Also, if possible, pick your classes for that first semester wisely - take one or two "difficult" classes and have the rest as "easy" classes.

    How does the scholarship work at UCL, as I imagine that would be the bulk of your costs (especially with accommodation)?
    Yes they did it over skype which was handy. Was a pretty friendly interview, I had been exchanging emails with the programme coordinator since December and he was the one conducing most of the interview.

    SF won't provide anything at all, they only provide assistance if you stay in the UK. If I got onto the UCL dual degree (again, not guaranteed) there might be a possibility I'd get the master's loan in the second year which would be at UCL, it depends on how the classify the dual awarded course.

    Well my background isn't in computer science, so I'm certainly not expecting to have covered much, or any of the first semester modules. Certainly that is the benefit of the Mahidol course, it essentially works as a conversion course (though less of a bridge from non-comp. sci. to a comp sci degree than conversion MSc courses in the UK). It is also quite flexible, if I failed to get onto the dual UCL-MU degree, and failed to get a scholarship, then I have the option to suspend studies after one year and work for a while to get some money. So there are plenty of benefits to the course, not to mention living in Thailand would be sick af. If it was even just £2k or so less I'd be much more excited about it.

    UCL offer a 10k scholarship I believe based on financial need. But I'd also get the SF loan.
 
 
 
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