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    I absolutely hate probability, statistics, and programming (due to their nature) and would like to know if I do need to know statistics in order to get a physics degree?

    I would also like to know if this is also the case for a math degree.
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    Yes statistics and probability is heavily involved in quantum and statistical mechanics (thermodynamics). Also programming depends on the physics degree but there will be some mandatory programming although you can chose to go down a more practical experimental route in most courses I think.
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    From a maths perspective, most if not all University courses have some form of required statistics modules in the first year, though depending on course you may be able to avoid statistics in later years of a maths degree.
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    Statistics and programming are two of the most important (and marketable) things you learn in a physics degree.
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    (Original post by alow)
    Statistics and programming are two of the most important (and marketable) things you learn in a physics degree.
    Uh, then I think physics isn't for me... That's really sad, back in IGCSE, I was the only one who truly understood physics concepts and was #1 in the class.

    I don't understand statistics no matter how hard I try and would kill my A level grade had I taken it. Much like literature but now it is considered math...
    I tried programming but there is too much to memorize,,,

    Yeah I don't think I could handle all the statistics and programming in uni (I would hate physics then).

    (Original post by K-Man_PhysCheM)
    From a maths perspective, most if not all University courses have some form of required statistics modules in the first year, though depending on course you may be able to avoid statistics in later years of a maths degree.
    Well, that's still better than in physics it seems...
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    Statistics and programming is what will get you jobs later.

    Learn to like them.
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    The nature of statistics changes a little at university. You may even like it
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    (Original post by TheTroll73)
    Uh, then I think physics isn't for me... That's really sad, back in IGCSE, I was the only one who truly understood physics concepts and was #1 in the class.

    I don't understand statistics no matter how hard I try and would kill my A level grade had I taken it. Much like literature but now it is considered math...
    I tried programming but there is too much to memorize,,,

    Yeah I don't think I could handle all the statistics and programming in uni (I would hate physics then).
    I used to be exactly the same as you: absolutely hated statistics and found it boring and hard to understand. Similarly with programming.

    But once I came across statistics in the context of quantum mechanics, it all suddenly made sense and was incredibly interesting and intuitive. At A-level, statistics is presented as this really dry set of rules and formulae but once you get to see the meaning behind it and the application, then it becomes a whole lot better.
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    (Original post by TheTroll73)
    Uh, then I think physics isn't for me... That's really sad, back in IGCSE, I was the only one who truly understood physics concepts and was #1 in the class.

    I don't understand statistics no matter how hard I try and would kill my A level grade had I taken it. Much like literature but now it is considered math...
    I tried programming but there is too much to memorize,,,

    Yeah I don't think I could handle all the statistics and programming in uni (I would hate physics then).



    Well, that's still better than in physics it seems...
    While there is some stats and programming in a physics degree there isnt loads. Anyone can handle it imo (I hate both regular stats and programming) but the stats applied to physics is more enjoyable than regular a level stats

    The thing you should be concerned about is a lot of physics grads go into something where the job you do requires one or the other as they are the only 2 real skills you learn. (unless you are going for a general grad job role)
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    While there is some stats and programming in a physics degree there isnt loads. Anyone can handle it imo (I hate both regular stats and programming) but the stats applied to physics is more enjoyable than regular a level stats

    The thing you should be concerned about is a lot of physics grads go into something where the job you do requires one or the other as they are the only 2 real skills you learn. (unless you are going for a general grad job role)
    Ah... as long as there isn't loads, it's more than alright. I know there will always be things I won't like; I just don't want it to make a large part of my studies.

    (Original post by yudothis)
    Statistics and programming is what will get you jobs later.

    Learn to like them.
    Wait... is physics alone really that useless?

    "Learn to like them" <-- what people kept telling me for literature, wish one could just do that.

    Looks like I have to search what I NEED to get a job that would fit with my interests.
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    (Original post by TheTroll73)
    Ah... as long as there isn't loads, it's more than alright. I know there will always be things I won't like; I just don't want it to make a large part of my studies.



    Wait... is physics alone really that useless?

    "Learn to like them" <-- what people kept telling me for literature, wish one could just do that.

    Looks like I have to search what I NEED to get a job that would fit with my interests.
    Don't worry it isnt a massive part, you can also look at course content to check how many programming modules there are.

    It isnt that physics is useless, its just not a vocational degree so doesnt lead to a specific career. So you can apply for all the general 'doesnt require a specific degree just wants a degree' grad jobs, but to be more competitive for those your experience outside of your degree is just as important ie summer internships, leadership roles etc.

    Make sure you have a career sector in mind that you would like to go into so that you can be sure that they take people with physics degrees. Another note when researching, engineering schemes say they take physics students but be careful, it is much harder to secure that role than if you already had an engineering degree due to several reasons including what is done during the undergrad degree in physics vs engineering
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    Don't worry it isnt a massive part, you can also look at course content to check how many programming modules there are.

    It isnt that physics is useless, its just not a vocational degree so doesnt lead to a specific career. So you can apply for all the general 'doesnt require a specific degree just wants a degree' grad jobs, but to be more competitive for those your experience outside of your degree is just as important ie summer internships, leadership roles etc.

    Make sure you have a career sector in mind that you would like to go into so that you can be sure that they take people with physics degrees. Another note when researching, engineering schemes say they take physics students but be careful, it is much harder to secure that role than if you already had an engineering degree due to several reasons including what is done during the undergrad degree in physics vs engineering
    Okay, I understand now. Since physics isn't a vocational degree, one would need stats and programming as they ARE vocational skills.
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    (Original post by TheTroll73)
    Ah... as long as there isn't loads, it's more than alright. I know there will always be things I won't like; I just don't want it to make a large part of my studies.



    Wait... is physics alone really that useless?

    "Learn to like them" <-- what people kept telling me for literature, wish one could just do that.

    Looks like I have to search what I NEED to get a job that would fit with my interests.
    Dude, in 20 years the world will be totally different. Learn to be good with computers and generally digitally. Trust me.
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    (Original post by TheTroll73)
    Okay, I understand now. Since physics isn't a vocational degree, one would need stats and programming as they ARE vocational skills.
    They are covered in a physics degree to do more physics (a lot of programming in theoretical physics) but yes they are very marketable skills to have (assuming you work in areas where those skills are used)

    My advice is to look at what careers you would like to go into and see what is needed to enter them. Don't just pick physics and hope for the best when you graduate, most people only get to do 1 undergrad degree
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    They are covered in a physics degree to do more physics (a lot of programming in theoretical physics) but yes they are very marketable skills to have (assuming you work in areas where those skills are used)

    My advice is to look at what careers you would like to go into and see what is needed to enter them. Don't just pick physics and hope for the best when you graduate, most people only get to do 1 undergrad degree
    I see... then I will look up for careers of interest and THEN decide what to study in uni.

    Thanks for the help
 
 
 
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