Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    I’m applying to university this year, but not sure which engineering course to apply for between the two.

    If I had to say my dream job, it would probably to work for the European Space Agency.

    What I see is that mechanical engineering is a broader degree, but still good enough to apply for almost every aerospace job.

    I’m just not sure which route to go down. I’m worried that if I don’t do aerospace, I’ll miss out on important things like orbital mechanics and space propulsion for aerospace jobs. On the flip side, If I do aerospace, I feel like I will be a worse candidate for some other mechanical jobs in the future if I want a slight change in career.

    I’d like to get a bachelor in mechanical and masters in aerospace, however I don’t believe this is possible with the Meng degree which only counts as one degree.

    Any advice?
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Aero is much more interesting (although I might be slightly biased as an aero engineer). Most Aero degrees are accredited by both the RAeS & IMechE so it'd make little difference in terms of employability tbh.

    Fun fact: 50% of Cambridge engineers end up specialising in a different area to what they'd originally intended
    • Section Leader
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EwanWest)
    Fun fact: 50% of Cambridge engineers end up specialising in a different area to what they'd originally intended
    I heard 25% but yeah...

    (Original post by DrDyk)
    I’d like to get a bachelor in mechanical and masters in aerospace, however I don’t believe this is possible with the Meng degree which only counts as one degree.

    Any advice?
    Correct it doesn't work like that. But you might be able to get a BEng in Mech, and then do a MSc in Aero.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    I heard 25% but yeah...



    Correct it doesn't work like that. But you might be able to get a BEng in Mech, and then do a MSc in Aero.
    I could be wrong on the exact number (Been a long time since 1st year) but it is definitely a noteworthy percentage
    • Section Leader
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EwanWest)
    I could be wrong on the exact number (Been a long time since 1st year) but it is definitely a noteworthy percentage
    Yes definitely. I got my number from a DoS, but yes it's certainly noteworthy.

    Have you or your coursemates changed their mind?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Yes definitely. I got my number from a DoS, but yes it's certainly noteworthy.

    Have you or your coursemates changed their mind?
    Personally I went in for pure aero, but I now dabble between that and nuclear engineering. I know several people who have changed, a common change seems to be from regular engineering to manufacturing (they're different tripos) or from chem eng to regular engineering. There are also a lot of people who end up just doing a general engineering without specialising in any area specifically
    • Section Leader
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EwanWest)
    Personally I went in for pure aero, but I now dabble between that and nuclear engineering. I know several people who have changed, a common change seems to be from regular engineering to manufacturing (they're different tripos) or from chem eng to regular engineering. There are also a lot of people who end up just doing a general engineering without specialising in any area specifically
    A nuclear aircraft would be, er, interesting

    And, as you know (but others might not), even the "generalists" can be accredited to various specialisations if they pick the right modules.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I'd say look into different Aerospace degrees as you will find that some of them are even broader than Mechanical.

    Mine is very broad to the point that a lot of Electrical and Electronic careers are open to us, and the only Mechanical careers I've really lost out on are those involving manufacturing.

    That said, there are worse things than missing out on orbital mechanics and space propulsion, the former is one of the easiest topics I've covered in my degree and we get a good laugh when freshers assume it's impossibly difficult. Depending on the uni you should be able to cover space propulsion in a mechanical degree, for example here at Sheffield the mechanical engineers get the opportunity to do Aero Propulsion and Advanced Aero propulsion modules, both of which cover rockets alongside turbomachinery.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    I'd say look into different Aerospace degrees as you will find that some of them are even broader than Mechanical.

    Mine is very broad to the point that a lot of Electrical and Electronic careers are open to us, and the only Mechanical careers I've really lost out on are those involving manufacturing.

    That said, there are worse things than missing out on orbital mechanics and space propulsion, the former is one of the easiest topics I've covered in my degree and we get a good laugh when freshers assume it's impossibly difficult. Depending on the uni you should be able to cover space propulsion in a mechanical degree, for example here at Sheffield the mechanical engineers get the opportunity to do Aero Propulsion and Advanced Aero propulsion modules, both of which cover rockets alongside turbomachinery.
    So you think I would be okay applying for engineering jobs in, for example, a car or tech sector with an aerospace degree? It shouldn't be too limiting to my engineering career, right?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DrDyk)
    So you think I would be okay applying for engineering jobs in, for example, a car or tech sector with an aerospace degree? It shouldn't be too limiting to my engineering career, right?
    Absolutely, I know a few people who graduated last year or are on placements years at companies like JLR and Cummins, I think there's also someone at McLaren.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    A nuclear aircraft would be, er, interesting

    And, as you know (but others might not), even the "generalists" can be accredited to various specialisations if they pick the right modules.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Indeed. In fact because of the nature of the Cambridge course RAeS, IET, IMechE & IStructE will accredit you regardless of which modules you take in 3rd & 4th year (there being no choice in modules in years 1 & 2)
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DrDyk)
    If I had to say my dream job, it would probably to work for the European Space Agency.
    But doing what job? That'll probably be more of a guidance of which degree to choose rather than simply an organisation you want to work for, which quite likely employs a huge range of different engineering specialisms, as well as scientists, project managers, etc.

    Although aero is very similar to mech overall (just more applied to aerospace as you would imagine), it will cover specific aerospace topics that mechanical won't. The question is, are these relevant to what you want to do in the future?
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: October 28, 2017
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.