Working while studying medicine Watch

dorotka7550
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#1
Hello. I'm considering applying to a med uni this year. I'm from Europe. Supposing I got into a good uni in UK would I be able to work and study? I was thinking about studying from Mon to Fri and working on Saturdays/Sundays. I will get no help from my parents. Is it possible to get migrant worker maintenance loan? I've heard it is really hard to get it.
0
reply
Blue_Cow
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 11 months ago
#2
(Original post by dorotka7550)
Hello. I'm considering applying to a med uni this year. I'm from Europe. Supposing I got into a good uni in UK would I be able to work and study? I was thinking about studying from Mon to Fri and working on Saturdays/Sundays. I will get no help from my parents. Is it possible to get migrant worker maintenance loan? I've heard it is really hard to get it.
Moved to Current Medical Students and Doctors so hopefully a student or graduate will see and answer
0
reply
pericardium
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#3
Report 11 months ago
#3
posting to follow
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
panda1093
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 11 months ago
#4
(Original post by dorotka7550)
Hello. I'm considering applying to a med uni this year. I'm from Europe. Supposing I got into a good uni in UK would I be able to work and study? I was thinking about studying from Mon to Fri and working on Saturdays/Sundays. I will get no help from my parents. Is it possible to get migrant worker maintenance loan? I've heard it is really hard to get it.
Hello! If you're a European Citizen then you won't have any VISA-related problems, you will be allowed to work in the UK as if you were a British citizen.

On the other hand if you're going to be studying medicine full-time-based on my experience- you will have little time to work as you'll probably spend most of your weekends either revising or trying to relax a bit...
Even if you managed to find part-time employment you couldn't rely solely on that source of income but you would still need financial backing from your parents.
0
reply
Smile88egc
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#5
Report 11 months ago
#5
I used to work 8-12 hours a week as a medical student and much more in the holidays but finding flexible employment is key and I know costs are much higher for international students.
0
reply
ecolier
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 11 months ago
#6
(Original post by dorotka7550)
Hello. I'm considering applying to a med uni this year. I'm from Europe. Supposing I got into a good uni in UK would I be able to work and study? I was thinking about studying from Mon to Fri and working on Saturdays/Sundays. I will get no help from my parents. Is it possible to get migrant worker maintenance loan? I've heard it is really hard to get it.
@forestcat was still working as a nurse as she was doing her graduate entry medicine course (which is much more intense), all the way until (near?) graduation.

In terms of a part time job, I am sure it can be done, especially in the earlier years when things are less "serious".
0
reply
dorotka7550
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#7
Thanks for all the replies!
0
reply
PocketMerlin
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#8
Report 11 months ago
#8
Would recommend doing private tutoring if you can!
0
reply
nexttime
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#9
Report 11 months ago
#9
(Original post by panda1093)
Hello! If you're a European Citizen then you won't have any VISA-related problems, you will be allowed to work in the UK as if you were a British citizen.

On the other hand if you're going to be studying medicine full-time-based on my experience- you will have little time to work as you'll probably spend most of your weekends either revising or trying to relax a bit...
Even if you managed to find part-time employment you couldn't rely solely on that source of income but you would still need financial backing from your parents.
Is that definitely the case even though OP will be starting studies post-Brexit? And even though 'Europe' =/= EU? I thought international students did need a student visa to study and tier 2 visa to work?

Not to mention international fees, which might apply post-Brexit/if OP is non-EU.

FYI its nice to provide a source for such important advice, or else its not exactly useful to the person you are answering and your time will have been wasted!
0
reply
panda1093
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#10
Report 11 months ago
#10
(Original post by nexttime)
Is that definitely the case even though OP will be starting studies post-Brexit? And even though 'Europe' =/= EU? I thought international students did need a student visa to study and tier 2 visa to work?
1)He said I'm from EUROPE therefore I assume he's European?
If you're an EU/EEA citizen you don't need any kind of VISA to either study or work in this country.



(Original post by nexttime)
Not to mention international fees, which might apply post-Brexit/if OP is non-EU.
2)From what I understand he's planning to start studying medicine next year or the year after, based on the information I have there won't be any changes in tuition fees for EU students for the next 2 academic years https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...es-past-brexit


(Original post by nexttime)
FYI its nice to provide a source for such important advice, or else its not exactly useful to the person you are answering and your time will have been wasted!
[/QUOTE]

FYI if you feel the need to criticise someone who takes time off their busy schedule to help someone else by providing information based on:
a)their personal experience
b)reliable sources
then you might as well try to be productive in your criticism as the real waste of time is your message that didn't help me in my better understanding of "how to provide reliable sources for "important advice"" and certainly didn't help the OP as everything you said was completely irrelevant to the original post.

Sorry about the rant but I found your post rather patronising.
3
reply
belis
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#11
Report 11 months ago
#11
(Original post by dorotka7550)
Hello. I'm considering applying to a med uni this year. I'm from Europe. Supposing I got into a good uni in UK would I be able to work and study? I was thinking about studying from Mon to Fri and working on Saturdays/Sundays. I will get no help from my parents. Is it possible to get migrant worker maintenance loan? I've heard it is really hard to get it.
I have done it. Worked as a nursing assistant all the way through med school, picking up night shift and long weekends. It was do-able but hard work. I don't have a need for a social life so it didn't bother me much to spend my evenings and weekends working. I had to be efficient about studying in the time available and utilise for example podcasts and flash cards when commuting. I was at a PBL Uni with a minimum contact time, which was perfect as I could study around work shifts. Working in a hospital was very handy, in fact, I have possibly learned more from being part of the team providing hands-on care with an actual responsibility than observing as a medical student.

It can be stressful though and income from a minimum pay job was not fantastic. I would recommend careful budgeting and choosing Uni up North where rent and other living expenses are much less.
1
reply
nexttime
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#12
Report 11 months ago
#12
(Original post by panda1093)
1)He said I'm from EUROPE therefore I assume he's European?
If you're an EU/EEA citizen you don't need any kind of VISA to either study or work in this country.
Serbia is not EEA/EU. Ukraine isn't. Russia isn't. There's a few more.

2)From what I understand he's planning to start studying medicine next year or the year after, based on the information I have there won't be any changes in tuition fees for EU students for the next 2 academic years https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...es-past-brexit
Thank you, its definitely useful to definitively know OP will still be eligible for tuition fee loans.

But i thought we were talking about right to work? Is that also guaranteed for EU citizens post-Brexit?

FYI if you feel the need to criticise someone who takes time off their busy schedule to help someone else by providing information based on:
a)their personal experience
b)reliable sources
You didn't name any reliable sources.

then you might as well try to be productive in your criticism as the real waste of time is your message that didn't help me in my better understanding of "how to provide reliable sources for "important advice and certainly didn't help the OP as everything you said was completely irrelevant to the original post.
???

You have subsequently provided a [sort of] source in exactly the manner i asked for so i consider my feedback to be very productive! (again: thank you)

Sorry about the rant but I found your post rather patronising.
Good. You seem intelligent enough to realise that a random person on the internet saying 'don't worry you will get a visa' is of zero value. Whereas a reliable source completely answers the question. I think you agree really.

We should hold ourselves to a higher standard than 99% of what you see on TSR/other fora. I just thought you might be capeable of that.
0
reply
dorotka7550
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#13
(Original post by belis)
I have done it. Worked as a nursing assistant all the way through med school, picking up night shift and long weekends. It was do-able but hard work. I don't have a need for a social life so it didn't bother me much to spend my evenings and weekends working. I had to be efficient about studying in the time available and utilise for example podcasts and flash cards when commuting. I was at a PBL Uni with a minimum contact time, which was perfect as I could study around work shifts. Working in a hospital was very handy, in fact, I have possibly learned more from being part of the team providing hands-on care with an actual responsibility than observing as a medical student.

It can be stressful though and income from a minimum pay job was not fantastic. I would recommend careful budgeting and choosing Uni up North where rent and other living expenses are much less.
Thank you for your response I would like to go to a PBL uni but only PBL med uni in Scotland is Glasgow and I don't feel like I can get in there
0
reply
Rainy Times
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#14
Report 11 months ago
#14
I worked 15 hours a week for the 2nd half of 1st year doing evening shifts in an admin job. Getting up at 6AM for a full day of placement then doing a 5 hour shift and not getting home till midnight is something to avoid if you can, especially around exam season. My uni's 1st year wasn't academically challenging so it was fine, but for some unis they might be more full on from the get go. I definitely won't be working during term time in future years. I've also been able to easily find full time temporary work for the summer despite living in the middle of nowhere, there's dozens of agencies that will bite your arm off if you can use a database.

However knowing how much international student fees are, that still probably won't be enough for you? If you worked during Easter/Christmas breaks and did a clinical trial once a year maybe it'd work out? You'd really need to sit down and work your finances out before you go through the whole application process, e.g. have you thought about the cost of flying in for multiple interviews?
0
reply
dorotka7550
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#15
Yes, I thought about flying costs etc but my main concern was whether I could make a living while studying. I'm an eea national so I'm eligible for student loan and maybe maintenance loan for migrant worker. But working during weekends would be essential if I got into a uni in UK.
0
reply
MonteCristo
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#16
Report 11 months ago
#16
There are two questions here:

(1) Is the workload and structure of medical school compatible with a part-time job? The answer to this is "yes" but it depends on the job and how organised/bright/hard working you are. Some jobs (e.g. health care assistant) are good for your development as a doctor and others (e.g. security or monitoring the library on campus) may even be compatible with studying while at work. Most universities have rules that limit students' part-time work during term time but these are rarely enforced. I worked 20+ hours per week during medical school but this was in a job in which I could study and - if anything - it probably increased the amount of time I spent studying medicine.

(2) Will you be permitted to work if in the UK as a student? No-one can answer this question as it completely depends on the deal in place (if any!!) once the UK has left the European Union. As a guide, students from non-EU countries usually enter the UK on a Tier 4 visa, which permits up to 20 hours work per week during term time and full-time work during the vacation. It is likely that anything put in place for students from EU students after Brexit will be at least as generous as this.
0
reply
dorotka7550
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#17
(Original post by MonteCristo)
There are two questions here:

(1) Is the workload and structure of medical school compatible with a part-time job? The answer to this is "yes" but it depends on the job and how organised/bright/hard working you are. Some jobs (e.g. health care assistant) are good for your development as a doctor and others (e.g. security or monitoring the library on campus) may even be compatible with studying while at work. Most universities have rules that limit students' part-time work during term time but these are rarely enforced. I worked 20+ hours per week during medical school but this was in a job in which I could study and - if anything - it probably increased the amount of time I spent studying medicine.

(2) Will you be permitted to work if in the UK as a student? No-one can answer this question as it completely depends on the deal in place (if any!!) once the UK has left the European Union. As a guide, students from non-EU countries usually enter the UK on a Tier 4 visa, which permits up to 20 hours work per week during term time and full-time work during the vacation. It is likely that anything put in place for students from EU students after Brexit will be at least as generous as this.
Thank you.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Bournemouth University
    Clearing Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 31 Jul '19
  • Staffordshire University
    Postgraduate open event - Stoke-on-Trent campus Postgraduate
    Wed, 7 Aug '19
  • University of Derby
    Foundation Open Event Further education
    Wed, 7 Aug '19

What are your favourite crisps?

Kettle Chips (45)
17.24%
McCoys Salt and Vinegar (19)
7.28%
McCoys Flame Grilled Steak (17)
6.51%
Walkers Prawn Cockail (28)
10.73%
Monster Munch (20)
7.66%
Pringles (70)
26.82%
Walkers Oven Baked Crisps (15)
5.75%
Walkers Beef and Onion (3)
1.15%
Thai Sweet Chili Sensations (44)
16.86%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed