What does (Hons) mean? Watch

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Kickflip
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I still don't know what (Hons) means. Can anyone enlighten me?
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Gaylei
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Honours

In England, Wales and Northern Ireland there are two different types of degree: Honours degrees and Ordinary degrees. The degrees awarded carry a designation related to the broad subject area such as B.A., B.Sc, B.Eng etc. Most degrees are now honours degrees, with an option not to take honours, and the standard length of a Honours bachelor's degree is 3 years. Prior to the mid 20th century all candidates would take an Ordinary degree and then be selected to go on for a final year for the Honours degree.

Honours degrees are of a superior academic standard. However the practice of writing 'Hons' as part of the degree designation is unofficial and is considered by many as an affectation. An Honours degree is always awarded in one of four classes depending upon the marks gained in the final assessments and examinations. The top students are awarded a first class degree, the next best, an upper second class degree (usually referred to as a 2:1), the next a lower second class degree (usually referred to as a 2:2), and those with the lowest marks gain a third class degree. An Ordinary or unclassified degree (which does not give the graduate the right to add '(Hons)') may be awarded if a student has completed the full honours degree course but has obtained a very low pass mark which is insufficient to merit a third-class honours degree.
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Kickflip
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I know that what does Honours mean?
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This Is Not A Username
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Honours
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The Boosh
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it means [intends to convey or refer to] a course of degree studies more specialised than for an ordinary pass.
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hobnob
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(Original post by The Boosh)
it means [intends to convey or refer to] a course of degree studies more specialised than for an ordinary pass.
But it's not quite as simple as that, actually, is it? I'm pretty sure Oxford doesn't have honours degrees, for example, so if I were to put "(hons)" after my BA that would be inaccurate.
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Eubacterium
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I did some research and the only thing I found is what Gaylei posted (ie - it proves a student reached a certain level of study). I couldn't find why the word honours is used. Maybe it means a honourable degree.
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hobnob
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(Original post by Eubacterium)
I did some research and the only thing I found is what Gaylei posted (ie - it proves a student reached a certain level of study). I couldn't find why the word honours is used. Maybe it means a honourable degree.
Perhaps because finals are called "final honour schools"?:dontknow:
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Gaylei
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(Original post by hobnob)
But it's not quite as simple as that, actually, is it? I'm pretty sure Oxford doesn't have honours degrees, for example, so if I were to put "(hons)" after my BA that would be inaccurate.
It seems to me that Oxford and the colleges do Hons Degrees, the only time putting Hons after your degree is wrong is if you have not been given your degree with Honours, Ie I got a BSc with Hons so If I wanted to write
BSc UC (Hons) after my name I am entitled to.

Have you graduated? If so your certificate will say either Hons or not

Bachelors' Degrees
The titles of these degrees are related to the subjects studied:

Bachelor of Arts (BA): humanities subjects
Bachelor of Science (BSc): science and business subjects
Bachelor of Laws (LLB): law
Depending on performance in examinations and in other work, Bachelors' degrees are classified in the following way:

Ordinary Degree - a degree without Honours: BA, BSc, LLB
Honours Degree - a degree with Honours
Third Class Honours: BA Hons (3rd), BSc Hons (3rd), LLB Hons (3rd)
Second Class Honours, Lower Division: BA Hons (2:2), BSc Hons (2:2), LLB Hons (2:2)
Second Class Honours, Upper Division: BA Hons (2:1), BSc Hons (2:1), LLB Hons (2:1)
First Class Honours: BA Hons (1st), BSc Hons (1st), LLB Hons (1st)
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Eubacterium
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(Original post by hobnob)
Perhaps because finals are called "final honour schools"?:dontknow:
I never heard of that term. When I googled it only Oxford websites came up and as that was one of the first unis established it makes sense that the usage of honours may have originated from final honour school.
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hobnob
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(Original post by Gaylei)
It seems to me that Oxford and the colleges do Hons Degrees, the only time putting Hons after your degree is wrong is if you have not been given your degree with Honours, Ie I got a BSc with Hons so If I wanted to write
BSc UC (Hons) after my name I am entitled to.

Have you graduated? If so your certificate will say either Hons or not
That's my point. It doesn't. My certificate only says "Bachelor of Arts". There's a bit about me having "satisfied the Examiners in Final Honour School of English Language and Literature", but that just means I passed finals.
(And no, I didn't get an unclassified pass degree, in case you were wondering).:p:
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Gaylei
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where mine says what degree score I got the bit where mine says the secondment something something I think in () it says (Hons) Im sure. Did you do a dissy? sometimes when a dissy has not been done they dont award Hons... or so I heard
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ChemistBoy
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(Original post by hobnob)
That's my point. It doesn't. My certificate only says "Bachelor of Arts". There's a bit about me having "satisfied the Examiners in Final Honour School of English Language and Literature", but that just means I passed finals.
(And no, I didn't get an unclassified pass degree, in case you were wondering).:p:
So it doesn't state what classification you got? How strange... I suppose that's due to the fact that at Oxford and Cambridge one takes parts and it is only by convention that the classification of one part is taken to be the final classification of the degree not be official rule of the university (therefore to be accurate then for such degrees one must give the classifications of each part of an oxbridge degree). Most, if not all other UK universities only give out a single honours classification. St Andrews had a split between pre-honours and honours years, the latter only counting towards the classification of your degree (so you are entered into the honours school of your particular subject).

On my certificate it reads:

'Master in Chemistry in Chemistry with Advanced Chemistry with Honours of the First Class'

So it's clearly there if one can get past the quite ridiculous name of my degree.
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Gaylei
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
So it doesn't state what classification you got? How strange... I suppose that's due to the fact that at Oxford and Cambridge one takes parts and it is only by convention that the classification of one part is taken to be the final classification of the degree not be official rule of the university (therefore to be accurate then for such degrees one must give the classifications of each part of an oxbridge degree). Most, if not all other UK universities only give out a single honours classification. St Andrews had a split between pre-honours and honours years, the latter only counting towards the classification of your degree (so you are entered into the honours school of your particular subject).

On my certificate it reads:

'Master in Chemistry in Chemistry with Advanced Chemistry with Honours of the First Class'

So it's clearly there if one can get past the quite ridiculous name of my degree.

yeah mine says BSc Health Studies and International Dvelopment Studies with Honours of the lower Second Class'

or something. I got a 2ii
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hobnob
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
So it doesn't state what classification you got? How strange...
Of course it does, but it doesn't say "hons" there either (the phrase they use on certificates is "... and was placed in the [X] class"). The only time the word "honour" occurs on my certificate is in the bit I quoted earlier.
I suppose that's due to the fact that at Oxford and Cambridge one takes parts and it is only by convention that the classification of one part is taken to be the final classification of the degree not be official rule of the university (therefore to be accurate then for such degrees one must give the classifications of each part of an oxbridge degree).
No, that's just Cambridge. At Oxford everything hinges on finals.
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alex p
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think honors relates to the pass mark and whether you passed it in one go - i know you cant get honors if you retake a year, and i think that applies to the retake of single exams as well
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ChemistBoy
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(Original post by hobnob)
Of course it does, but it doesn't say "hons" there either (the phrase they use on certificates is "... and was placed in the [X] class"). The only time the word "honour" occurs on my certificate is in the bit I quoted earlier.
I think it's assumed then, after all one could ask the question, "class of what?", otherwise.
No, that's just Cambridge. At Oxford everything hinges on finals.
Is that truly official or just a de facto thing (like a cambridge)? I know the Oxford chemistry degree has parts IA, IB and II, for example.
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Kitsch
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(Original post by hobnob)
No, that's just Cambridge. At Oxford everything hinges on finals.
Not for all subjects. Some have finals in 2nd and 3rd year (Chemistry, Physics, maybe maths?)
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Gaylei
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
I think it's assumed then, after all one could ask the question, "class of what?", otherwise.


Is that truly official or just a de facto thing (like a cambridge)?
Originally Posted by hobnob
Of course it does, but it doesn't say "hons" there either (the phrase they use on certificates is "... and was placed in the [X] class"). The only time the word "honour" occurs on my certificate is in the bit I quoted earlier.
I think it's assumed then, after all one could ask the question, "class of what?", otherwise.

No, that's just Cambridge. At Oxford everything hinges on finals.

Is that truly official or just a de facto thing (like a cambridge)?



Finals? eah? dont you just do three years with exams and course work and finish on exams and a dissy?
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Kitsch
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Is that truly official or just a de facto thing (like a cambridge)? I know the Oxford chemistry degree has parts IA, IB and II, for example.
For Oxford Chem you have Part 1A in 2nd year, worth 25% of your final total, Part 1B in 3rd, worth 50%, and then Part 2 which is essentially a year of lab work - like a 'mini-PhD' - which is also worth 25%.
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