Johnson's government has just lost their majority Watch

NJA
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#41
Report 2 weeks ago
#41
(Original post by nulli tertius)
Corbyn has to play it very carefully, but so long as Boris appears shady about the election or October 31, Corbyn can justify hanging on.
Can't Boris sign some legal document to say he will not change the election date?
0
reply
Fullofsurprises
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#42
Report 2 weeks ago
#42
(Original post by nulli tertius)
He doesn't have to. He only needs to be watching Forest that evening.

There are 299 combined Tories and DUP. There are 302 (247+35+15+4+1) Lab, Lib, SNP, PC and Green.

Some of the 43 independents + Change will vote but the split of voting independents could well be in Corbyn's favour.
You're talking about just for one vote? I meant in the context of a government that would last for more than a few days and with Corbyn legislating.
0
reply
barnetlad
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#43
Report 2 weeks ago
#43
(Original post by fallen_acorns)
if Corbyn refuses an election, it will be a disaster for labour. Instead of making Borris seem like a failure, it will rally the brexit-support aorund him. As long as Boris is being forced by parliment to delay brexit, and not doing it on his own accord, it will strengthen boris' brexit base, and strengthen their anger towards parliment. On the flip side corbyn looks weak and scared of an election, and Labour get branded as the 'delay' party.
Labour are doing badly and so not having an election would be their best choice. Tony Blair was correct on this one.
0
reply
Fullofsurprises
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#44
Report 2 weeks ago
#44
(Original post by NJA)
Can't Boris sign some legal document to say he will not change the election date?
Nothing that he can't overturn with a majority. Parliament is sovereign, or so the British constitution allegedly infers, at least it was that way until Rees-Mogg and Cummings and their little tool Johnson took over and turned it into a mere bagatelle.
0
reply
Rakas21
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#45
Report 2 weeks ago
#45
(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Nothing that he can't overturn with a majority. Parliament is sovereign, or so the British constitution allegedly infers, at least it was that way until Rees-Mogg and Cummings and their little tool Johnson took over and turned it into a mere bagatelle.
Its all a misnomer since he has no pre election majority, it’s a delay tactic to make sure the bill to extend gets royal accent.

Boris could just wave it through though but his best bet is to call Labour’s bluff tonight given the videos he can stick online for Tory advertisement.

If Corbyn holds out there is the option of bypassing with a simple majority that does stick the date in law. There are enough retiring MP’s that might not be too bothered about being able to retire by Friday.
0
reply
fallen_acorns
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#46
Report 2 weeks ago
#46
(Original post by _Wellies_)
You clearly haven’t learnt the lesson from very recent history.

This is the sort of bullishness the Conservatives displayed in 2017, so they confidently called an election and lost their majority. Brexit would be done and dusted by now if it wasn’t for that failed gamble.
May was right to call an election then.. look at the results of the local elections that happened just after she called the general, she crushed them, and the Labour Party were in tatters, just like the polls predicted.

What then happened is in the space of a month she displayed exactly why you shouldn't have a weak campaigner as your leader, you can make a list of the 10 biggest mistakes she made in that month, the u turns, the scared avoiding of debates, the poor public speaking, etc etc

It was nothing to do with the idea of calling an election though, or with the publics opinion of the Tory party, it was her failure. The worry for labour is that even with all of her mistakes and poor campaigning, they still lost. Boris is a different beast when he gets in front of an audience.
0
reply
Quady
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#47
Report 2 weeks ago
#47
(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
The key question would be, would the likes of Ken Clarke support such a government. That has to be doubtful.
I think it would entirely depend on the queens speech that Government put down. If it were in effect to do not much other than reask the question via a referendum I suspect he would support it.
0
reply
paul514
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#48
Report 2 weeks ago
#48
(Original post by Quady)
I suspect you're right that was the plan. But actually it seems this fixed term thing might be 'working' here.

Bojo cant just call an election, he can be dragged through the mud for a good while.
He can put down a bill for an election and call no confidence both needing 50% plus one - as I said all the stops plays into his hands
0
reply
paul514
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#49
Report 2 weeks ago
#49
(Original post by nulli tertius)
I'm sorry. Once you have lost control, you have lost control.

Corbyn isn't going to give Boris a general election until after he has gone to Brussels to get his extension and failed to leave on 31 October. Corbyn needs Boris to be seen as a Brexit failure.

Even then, I think Corbyn may well make another pitch to be put in office with Liberal and SNP support. He might get that support if he offers a referendum before an election.
Boris needs corbyn to do that!

Even if the delay passes or a referendum (which there is no majority for) a new majority government simply passes a new bill once elected to reverse that.
0
reply
paul514
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#50
Report 2 weeks ago
#50
(Original post by _Wellies_)
You clearly haven’t learnt the lesson from very recent history.

This is the sort of bullishness the Conservatives displayed in 2017, so they confidently called an election and lost their majority. Brexit would be done and dusted by now if it wasn’t for that failed gamble.
Sorry but that’s not true.

That was under Theresa May who promised nothing, wasn’t seen as a leaver by the leave camp and stuck the dementia tax into her manifesto that promised nothing.

That situation has completely reversed.
Last edited by paul514; 2 weeks ago
0
reply
Quady
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#51
Report 2 weeks ago
#51
(Original post by paul514)
He can put down a bill for an election and call no confidence both needing 50% plus one - as I said all the stops plays into his hands
Bill for an election can be amended to add an in/out referendum :P

If Bojo doesn't have confidence in his Government then who will lol

Bojo doesn't have the whip of 50% minus one, let alone 50% plus one....
0
reply
ByEeek
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#52
Report 2 weeks ago
#52
(Original post by Alt Tankie)
Sure. But I think ‘compromise’ and ‘moderation’ have been terms completely abused so that they have just become shorthand for corrupt or without principles. Here’s a word that people are looking for much more than compromise- Authenticity.
Agreed. And BJ is about as far from that as possible. I still vividly remember his enthusiastic speech looking forward to Turkey joining the EU and who can forget his night of tortured deliverations as he wrestled with which side to join. Remain or leave. If ever there was a politician who has no values, it is Boris. He simply goes where the wind blows strongest. He is the epitamy of a career politician.

By contrast Corbyn has well defined values. It is just a shame those values appear to so few. Hence my reassertion that a true leader of our country is someone who's agenda aligns with most people.

I also feel that Brits are not very attached to any particular idiology (very much in play in parliament at the moment) but are more concerned with outcomes.
Last edited by ByEeek; 2 weeks ago
0
reply
nulli tertius
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#53
Report 2 weeks ago
#53
(Original post by paul514)
Boris needs corbyn to do that!

Even if the delay passes or a referendum (which there is no majority for) a new majority government simply passes a new bill once elected to reverse that.
In the same way that the last referendum has shaped political debate for the last three years, it is unrealistic to assume that any future government would be able to plough on without regard to that referendum outcome.
0
reply
Alt Tankie
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#54
Report 2 weeks ago
#54
(Original post by ByEeek)
Agreed. And BJ is about as far from that as possible. I still vividly remember his enthusiastic speech looking forward to Turkey joining the EU and who can forget his night of tortured deliverations as he wrestled with which side to join. Remain or leave. If ever there was a politician who has no values, it is Boris. He simply goes where the wind blows strongest. He is the epitamy of a career politician.

By contrast Corbyn has well defined values. It is just a shame those values appear to so few. Hence my reassertion that a true leader of our country is someone who's agenda aligns with most people.

I also feel that Brits are not very attached to any particular idiology (very much in play in parliament at the moment) but are more concerned with outcomes.
Boris is interesting. Whilst it’s true he isn’t authentic he is a very mild populist (as is Corbyn) . A authentic politician with unpopular ideas will still lose to an inauthentic one with popular ideas.

No people are set on a particular ideology.

On your point about a true leader, unfortunately not. Whilst you do great truly great leaders most leaders are shaped by events rather than beliefs or character
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What's your favourite genre?

Rock (201)
23.96%
Pop (208)
24.79%
Jazz (33)
3.93%
Classical (46)
5.48%
Hip-Hop (162)
19.31%
Electronic (57)
6.79%
Indie (132)
15.73%

Watched Threads

View All