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Engineering

How do I decide whether to apply for mechanical engineering or aeronautical/aerospace engineering if i'm interested in both?
Flip a coin if you’re equally interested in both.

Or take some moocs in both / look into the topics covered by each and see which you prefer.

Or take a yini gap year and work in one of the areas and see if you like it.
Personally I would apply for mechanical because there are more opportunities and most aeronautical/aerospace engineering jobs you can also get with a mechanical engineering degree.

But thats if you are equally interested in both.
Reply 3
Original post by RaghavB
How do I decide whether to apply for mechanical engineering or aeronautical/aerospace engineering if i'm interested in both?


depends if you want to be able to tell people “I’m a rocket scientist” or not 😎
Go to an Open Day at a Uni that offers both courses - like Bath or Bristol - and sign up for the subjects talks for BOTH subjects.
Or go on YouTube and look for recorded subject talks from previous years.
Original post by RaghavB
How do I decide whether to apply for mechanical engineering or aeronautical/aerospace engineering if i'm interested in both?

Aerospace is basically just a specialisation of mechanical.

It won’t make a significant difference, you can go into aerospace sector with a mechanical degree similarly you can move into energy/automotive/most mechanical eng roles with an aerospace degree.

If you have a particular interest in the aerospace sector then aero is probably the way to go, as for example your if you learn thermodynamics in mechanical degrees they tend to focus on the Otto cycle (more associated with automotive or energy sector, whereas in aerospace they probably start with Brayton (commonly used in turbofan engines i.e. what you have on your typical boeing or airbus). Similarly with fluid mechanics in aerospace your tutorials will focus on aerodynamics (looking at air over things like aerofoils/wings in mechanical you might do many more fluids (water/oils & different types of applications). Of course the physics is the same just a case of application.

You see my point, it doesn’t make a big difference but if you are super passionate about aircraft do aerospace, if you want to consider a wider array of applications probably go mechanical.

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