The Student Room Group

pharmacy

If i do a pharmacy degree, can I get into pharmaceutical sales because apparently its biochem.
Mpharm is the only way to become a pharmacist in the UK as of 2023, but if you are not going to become a pharmacist, Mpharm is just the same as any other degrees. You can definitely get into pharmaceutical sales if you want and there is no problem doing so. Sales is a very generic job, and if you look at pfizer for example (one of the biggest pharmaceutical company), most of the labours work in pharmaceutical sales, and MBA, Chemistry, and Pharmacy are the top 3 majors among the people who are working at pfizer, according to LinkedIn. In conclusion, to get into pharmaceutical sales, although having a major in biochem or pharmacy might help, there is no 'degree requirements'.
Reply 2
Original post by BestStudent48567
Mpharm is the only way to become a pharmacist in the UK as of 2023, but if you are not going to become a pharmacist, Mpharm is just the same as any other degrees. You can definitely get intol sales if you want and there is no problem doing so. Sales is a very generic job, and if you look at pfizer for example (one of the biggest pharmaceutical company), most of the labours work in pharmaceutical sales, and MBA, Chemistry, and Pharmacy are the top 3 majors among the people who are working at pfizer, according to LinkedIn. In conclusion, to get into pharmaceutical sales, although having a major in biochem or pharmacy might help, there is no 'degree requirements'.

which do think one pays more pharmacist or pharmaceutical sales
Average salary for Clinical Pharmacist at NHS and pfizer is £46,000 and sales is £43,000. However, there are commissions and bonuses in sales so make sure to consider them.
https://www.rpharms.com/resources/careers-information/career-options-in-pharmacy/industrial-pharmacy

Have a look into the above link. From my experience working as a clinical pharmacist, I would recommend pharmacy as a degree which will open opportunities to both going into a more clinical role e.g. GP or hospital, or on a pharmaceutical industry role and working in research, to manufacturing, to sales and marketing.

Pharmacy itself is a broad subject and you do learn elements of pharmaceutical industry as an undergraduate. However, you would have to be pro-active in looking out for work experiences in the pharmaceutical industry and job opportunities to stand out, specially as you go to 3rd and 4th year of university.

In terms of pay, I can tell you that you would start at a more junior level in both sectors and go through a pay progression/promotion. On the NHS, this follows pay band scale, starting at band 6 post registration, progressing potentially up to band 9. On the industry, again you will start at a more junior level depending on your chosen area and I know someone working as a 'Qualified Person or QP' can earn a very good salary. On both sectors, you have the opportunity to do overtime/on-call and take on additional work load to increase income.

For your foundation year (pre-registration), you can also apply for a split training programme with the NHS and the pharmaceutical industry. However, these places can be quite competitive. Post registration, you have greater flexibility to apply for varied roles that you are interested in.

Original post by io432
which do think one pays more pharmacist or pharmaceutical sales
(edited 1 year ago)
pharmacy because it offers a lot more options in pharmaceutical companies. if your a pharmacist, instead of just doing sales, you could go beyond and be a Medical Science Liaison (essentially clinical expert who is more or less selling drugs to clinicians but earning twice as standards pharm rep), or work in marketing, reg affairs or medical affairs.

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending