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The Mindful Minor

Hello TSR! It’s been a minute (two weeks, I think) since my last post. Sorry about that. Life caught up to me.

I’ve changed the name of my blog from Weekly Wins and Woes to The Mindful Minor because I feel like it’s better suited for me. I’m going to be a ‘kid’ until 6 Oct and then I’ll change this to ‘The Mindful Major’. I think it sounds funny.

I’ll also be posting it in the Creativity Corner as well as the Mental Health Channel depending on the topic I want to discuss because this blog is both a creative and mental well-being project.

I deleted my last Weekly Wins and Woes post because I came to realise how angry it actually was (those of you who read it might have realised I’ve got issues) and upon some self reflection, I realised that I don’t want to be that person who vents on the internet. I want to be someone people come to for advice. That last post really didn’t help with what I wanted and I’m sorry for posting it, it was a mistake.

A friend told me that maybe I should try using my ‘blog’ like a public journal. I liked the idea but wasn’t entirely sure how to go about it until Ali Abdaal showed me how. I just start!

I want to continue posting once every week, this time on Mondays, and learn to be better as this blog grows. I’d like to create an official platform sometime next year and maybe even make some side money off it. But all that’s in the future. For now, let me tell you about what I’ve learnt since my last week’s blog-rage.

I signed up for a daily article on ‘Thinking Traps’ by Psych Central. I feel like they really apply to me. Today’s session is day one. Here is my summary and understanding of it:

How thoughts can self-sabotage

Thinking traps, also known as cognitive distortions, are a way of thinking that negatively affects one’s understanding of reality. Sometimes these thought patterns can become so ingrained in our lives that they can seriously impact one’s life. Learning to identify and challenge cognitive distortions is a core tenant of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), an evidence-based style of therapy that helps one examine their thoughts and how they influence their behavior.

Recognizable thinking patterns

Overgeneralizing. This is when sweeping generalizations are made based on an isolated event. For instance, I failed to grasp a bio concept and began to think I’m a failure.

Emotional reasoning. When someone lets their feelings determine their fate, emotional reasoning may be to blame. With this distortion, one may mistake feelings for facts. Therefore, feeling worried about not understanding my work became ‘I’m just dumb’

Should-ing. At the heart of this distortion are rules and expectations, often arbitrarily set, for how one think they should behave. Shoulding might sound like, “I should have understood this,” or “I should plan my time better.”

Blaming. Making other people responsible for one’s feelings is also a type of cognitive distortion.

Catastrophizing. Catastrophizing makes it seem like a worst-case scenario is inevitable. For example, if I failed my exams, I’d be seen as a failure and disappointment.



Tomorrow’s article will be on how this all has an impact on my life, though I feel like I’ve already made that clear, and I’ll share it with you all next week.

I really found all of this enlightening and it made me feel a lot less guilty and alone. I hope it’s made you feel the same way

As usual, it is my personal goal to improve this blog in anyway I can be it writing style, punctuation, topics. So if you have any ideas on how I can improve please let me know.

Have a wonderful day!
(edited 10 months ago)

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@Mashle ; @illegallylexi ; @A_J ; @EnigmaChess ; @QueenRose ; @Sorcerer of Old
Not sure if you guys are still interested in this. Just say the word if so.
Original post by PiltoverQueen
@Mashle ; @illegallylexi ; @A_J ; @EnigmaChess ; @QueenRose ; @Sorcerer of Old
Not sure if you guys are still interested in this. Just say the word if so.


I'm still interested. Also just letting you know that you tagged the wrong A_J, the one you tagged is a 35-year-old bloke who hasn't logged on since 2008 :lol:
Original post by Sorcerer of Old
I'm still interested. Also just letting you know that you tagged the wrong A_J, the one you tagged is a 35-year-old bloke who hasn't logged on since 2008 :lol:

:eek4:Please help me tag the right A__J
(edited 10 months ago)
Reply 4
The Mindful Major
6 October is close. You will get promoted soon. Woohoo!!
5 Ways thinking traps affect our behaviour

It’s tempting to dismiss the importance of thoughts. But thoughts have tremendous influence over self-perception, which then can affect behaviour and, ultimately, the course one’s life takes.

- **Perfectionism**. This often stems from a distorted reality. One may believe they’re *inherently inadequate*, and therefore, have to constantly prove their worth.
- **Jealousy**. The brain may easily jump to worst-case scenarios, so when a partner stays out later than usual, one may think it’s because they’re being unfaithful.
- **Defensiveness**. Taking things such as offhand, innocuous comments as personal attacks, causing one to go on the defensive.
- **Overworking**. Maybe you don’t think you deserve time off, or maybe you feel like your project-mates can’t handle a day without you.
- **Fixating on what other people think**. One may believe that with enough effort, they can change how people perceive them, but this can actually be a thought trap.

Wow! I feel like these Psych Central people have been watching me all throughout the year. I’ve been going through **ALL** of this!! It feels overwhelmingly wonderful to know that I’m not alone in this. Thank you God for Psych Central! I can work on this now that I know I’m not alone in it or a special case. I will be better.


Hello TSR!

As promised, I’ll be sharing with you how distorted thinking traps affect behaviour. I honestly feel like these PsychCentral people have been watching me all year because of how hard all of this hits home.

I think one of the biggest causes for this is bottling up. I have a LONG history of bottling up and exploding. You’d think I’d have learnt my lesson by now. lol!

I just have this mentality that I have to handle everything myself. *Why should others have to know about my problems? How would they even help me?* It’s all very exhausting to be honest and irrational, I know.

I think I should look into why people have irrational fears. What do you think?

Have a wonderful day!
Reply 6
I suffer from some of these too, especially perfectionism. To think they are actually just your brain not letting you have peace. Whew, what a realisation!
Hello TSR!
It's been another while since my last post. Sorry about that. I spent the last week on a brain-cation. I binged the entire Bungo Stray Dogs anime and made study plans for August.
I still stand by my promise to write 3 posts a week. I'm only realising how much work such a commitment is today. But I fully intend to see it through! And I truly appreciate the support of all of those who read my posts.
Now, without further ado, this today's post: Irrational fears.

P.S it gets a little uncomfortable so please read at your own risk!
Irrational fears

Aka phobias - a persistent, excessive, unrealistic fear of an object, person, animal, activity or situation. It is a type of anxiety disorder. A person with a phobia either tries to avoid the thing that triggers the fear, or endures it with great anxiety and distress.

Types

Simple phobias

Often disappear on their own as the child gets older and usually do not cause problems in adulthood. A specific or simple phobia is an unreasonable fear caused by the presence of a particular situation or object. This type of phobia is known to cause mild or no danger, and it often develops during childhood and become less severe as the individual get older.e.g

- Animal phobia also known as zoophobia, this is the irrational fear that happens when a person faces an animal (other phobias associated with animal phobia are cynophobia, apiphobia and orithophobia)

- Environmental phobia: occur when an individual is involved in a specific natural situation or event (this phobia consists of other phobias like acrophobia and astrphobia)

Complex phobias

Known to be disruptive or creating a more disabling impact on life when compared to specific phobias. These phobias mostly develop during adulthood and are associated with a deep-rooted fear about a certain situation or circumstance. Sometimes complex phobias continue for many years. There are several types of complex phobias, and some common examples include agoraphobia and social phobia.

- Agoraphobia is associated with the fear of open spaces, but it can be more complex than that. The agoraphobic patient tends to be anxious at the situation or places from where escape is difficult, or help would not be available if panic attack ensues. A person with agoraphobia may be scared of traveling on public transport, visiting a shopping center, or even being alone at home (in most severe cases of this condition).

- On the other hand, in social phobia an individual is afraid to face the life or social situations. The patients tends to act abnormally nervous. Moreover, the affected person might feel afraid of talking in front of people or in public in fear of being humiliated. Social phobia is also known as Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD).

Similarities and differences

Most phobias have similar symptoms: an excessive fear of a specific object or situation, avoidance of objects or situations that causes great distress, as well as the presence of physical changes such as nausea, sweating, shaking, breathing difficulties, dizziness and lightheadedness (characterized as panic attack).

However, there are some differences as well. Simple phobias usually develop in early childhood, i.e., between 4 and 8 years. On the other hand, complex phobias develop in adolescence or are created by traces of the early childhood experiences. Furthermore, it is believed that simple phobias may or may not be caused genetically (running in families). Usually, such phobias are the result of negative reactions or panic attacks related to a specific object or situation, and are sometimes acquired from other peoples’ experience. For instance, if someone shares the phobia with other family members (like the fear of spider or arachnophobia), this may be because they have learned about the fear of spider as a child.
However, when considering complex phobias, the exact causes of agoraphobia and social phobia are unknown. Some believe that genetic traits, brain chemistry, and life experience may all play a part in the development of these phobias.

In the brain

The brain structure that plays a critical role in phobias is the amygdala that is commonly associated with emotions (especially fear). The amygdala is responsible for connecting the fear-arousing stimulus with the environmental context in which it is occurring. In addition, the amygdala triggers responses from the body to react quickly to threat and danger.

If you have a phobia then you’ll definetely experience these:

- The phobic object or situation is actively avoided. Individuals refuse to stay in the feared situation, something that can lead to a deterioration in quality of life, especially if the phobic stimulus is encountered on a day-to-day basis.
- The fear or anxiety is persistent, usually lasting for 6 months or more.
- Individuals with specific phobia recognize that their anxiety is out of proportion to the actual danger that the object or situation poses.
- Fear, anxiety or avoidance can cause significant distress or affect areas of functioning (e.g., social life, work).

My phobias

- Trypophobia is a specific type of phobia characterized by a fear of holes. People with trypophobia may express feelings of disgust or fear, as well as other nonspecific symptoms, when encountering stimuli containing irregular patterns or clustered holes.

I’ve suffered several skin conditions since I was a kid. While many of them have gone away, one is persistent: I get the strangest pustles, or ‘pimples’ as I call them, on the palm of my hand. They used to come whenever my skin was dry but now show up whenever I get stressed and they tend to overstay their welcome. Obviosly, I’m advised not to squeeze or burst them but these things itch! I’m talking about piercing and burning itching that just gets worse when you scratch. So I usually use a campus to help me painlessly pop them. It’s very satisfying but tends to leave holes in my skin which is where I get my anxiety about them from.

- Allphobia: The Fear of Being Taken/Kidnapped

I’ve grown up with stranger danger thoroughly ingrained in me. The stories my mom used to tell me of girls being kidnapped and their bodies being found in swamps helped with that. Also, because I’m chubby and look older than I am I’ve been catcalled on the streets or stared at deliberately and that just has my anxiety on full thrust! I remember some guy even once tried to grab me! I hate leaving my house unless I’m in a car and I hate leaving the car unless I’m on private property, like a restaurant or supermarket. And even when I am left in the car I get this anxious feeling that someone is going to jump in and steal the car with me in it. I get dizzy just thinking of all the different scenarios.


Just so you know…

It’s not the fear that’s always irrational, but the response to it. A fear of snakes, small rooms, or, in my case, holes can be perfectly rational. What is irrational is if your response to that stimulus is wildly out of proportion and overly exagerrated. But then again, depending on your past experiences, they might be totally justified.

Gosh, the research for this post has left me feeling dizzy and cringed out. I hope you guys were OK reading it too.

My sources:

https://www.news-medical.net/health/Simple-Versus-Complex-Phobias.aspx

https://youtu.be/IAdjwfROzIc

[https://neuronup.us/cognitive-stimulation-news/mental-disorder/anxiety-disorder/phobia/phobias-and-the-brain-eliminating-phobias/#:~:text=The brain structure that plays,contextin which it is occurring](https://neuronup.us/cognitive-stimulation-news/mental-disorder/anxiety-disorder/phobia/phobias-and-the-brain-eliminating-phobias/#:~:text=The%20brain%20structure%20that%20plays,contextin%20which%20it%20is%20occurring).

https://youtu.be/Q61D139K-Dc

Stay healthy and safe and thanks for reading!
Hello TSR!!!!

On Monday, I discussed irrational fears and even shared two of mine. Today, I want to tell you about how to face those fears.

Facing your fears can be challenging, but it's also an incredibly rewarding experience. By facing your fears, you'll build your confidence and learn that you're capable of more than you thought possible. So don't be afraid to face your fears head-on. You'll be glad you did!

The Stoics believed that to overcome fear one must face it head on. The great Stoic philosopher, and personal friend of mine (not), Seneca wrote,

If you want a man to keep his head when the risis comes you must give him some training before it comes.

The best way to overcome fear is to face it before it arrives. Unfortunately, we don’t always know what exactly we’re afraid of; all we have to do is some random google search about something random to unlock a new fear.



So how do we figure this out?

1. Identify your fears. The first step to facing your fears is to identify what you're afraid of. Once you know what your fears are, you can start to understand them and develop a plan to overcome them. But please don’t go hunting for new ones on google, that will make this entire journey too long!

2. Talk to someone you trust. Talking to someone you trust about your fears can be a great way to get support and advice. They can help you to understand your fears and to develop a plan to face them. But make sure it’s done privately.

3. Challenge your thoughts. Often, our fears are based on irrational thoughts. For example, if you're afraid of public speaking, you might think that everyone will think you're stupid (raise your hand if this is you 🙋). But challenging these thoughts can help you to see that they're not true. Ask yourself why you feel this way and what experience or proof you have to back it up.

4. Gradually face your fears. It's important to face your fears gradually. Don't try to face your biggest fear all at once. Start with something small and work your way up. In my case, I should probably try getting out more, but seeing as I have no social life or any business outside my front door I think I’ll just watch medical documentaries that cause holes in the skin until I stop feeling uncomfortable instead.
Movie Night!!!

5. Reward yourself for your progress. As you face your fears, it's important to reward yourself for your progress. This will help you to stay motivated and to build your confidence. Everyone has fears, so if you're able to take that big first step to overcome them, then you definetely deserve a treat!

6. Get professional help if needed. If you're struggling to face your fears on your own, don't be afraid to get professional help. A therapist can help you to understand your fears and to develop a plan to overcome them.

Personal example: I can't dance! At all!! I'm awkward and self-cautious. But I totally admire those who can; so I'm teaching myself how to dance. I'm just starting with the basics but even though I'm alone when I practice, I still feel that uncomfortable twist in my tummy like I'm on a public stage and people are watching me. But a bit of groove is something I really want for myself so I have no choice but to keep moving my hips until that knot loosens up. Wish me luck!

Just a reminder:

- Be patient. It takes time to overcome fears. Don't get discouraged if you don't see results immediately. Just keep working at it and you'll eventually reach your goal.

- Don't give up. It's normal to feel scared when you're facing your fears. But don't give up. Just keep taking small steps forward and eventually you'll reach your goal.

- Remember that you're not alone. Everyone has fears. You're not the only one who's afraid of public speaking, spiders, or heights or public spaces. There are people who can help you to overcome your fears but it’s really better if you do this journey on your own to avoid becoming dependent on someone for safety (unless you actually need the extra support)

Here is a terrific video I watched on facing more general fears: https://youtu.be/5SaLvyITY1c . I hope you love it as much as I did!!
BTW, any ideas for what I should discuss on Friday? I'm open to anything
@Mashle ; @illegallylexi ; @A______J ; @EnigmaChess ; @QueenRose ; @Sorcerer of Old
(edited 9 months ago)
Original post by PiltoverQueen
BTW, any ideas for what I should discuss on Friday? I'm open to anything
@Mashle ; @illegallylexi ; @A______J ; @EnigmaChess ; @QueenRose ; @Sorcerer of Old


Have you thought about mental health support services such as Childline?
No, I hadn't actually. I'll look into the topic.
Thanks!
(edited 9 months ago)
Hello TSR!

This is my last post for the week. I can’t believe I was actually able to pull off 3 posts in a week. What an achievement!!!👏👏👏👏👏🎉🎉🎉🎉🎉



I promise to keep up this good work!

After Wednesday’s post, I was asked to discuss mental health helplines. As usual, I did the necessary research for it; here’s what I found:

The Importance of Teen Mental Health Services

As I’ve discussed before, one’s teen years are a time of great change and uncertainty. With all the pressures of school, friendships, and relationships, it's no wonder that many teens struggle with their mental health.

That's why teen mental health services are so important. These services can provide teens with the support they need to cope with their challenges and to thrive.

Why Teen Mental Health Services Are Good

There are many reasons why teen mental health services are good:

- They can help teens to understand their mental health problems.
- They can teach teens coping mechanisms to manage their symptoms.
- They can connect teens with other teens who are struggling.
- They can provide teens with access to medication, if needed.
- They can help teens to develop a treatment plan that works for them.

Why People Are Against Teen Mental Health Services

Unfortunately, there are some people who are against teen mental health services. Here are a few of the reasons why:

- They believe that mental health problems are not real.
- They believe that seeking help for mental health problems is a sign of weakness.
- They believe that teen mental health services are too expensive.
- They believe that teen mental health services will stigmatize teens.

It really is sad that we live in a world where such reasons to not get the help you need exist. Fortunately, there are organisations and institutions battling against these. I’ll focus on Childline:

Childline

One of the most well-known teen mental health services is Childline. Childline is a free, confidential helpline for children and young people under 19 in the United Kingdom. Childline is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and can be accessed by calling 0800 1111, emailing, or chatting online.

Childline counsellors are trained to listen to children and young people and to offer support and advice. They can help with a wide range of issues, including:

- Mental health
- Bullying
- Abuse
- Family problems
- Other issues

The Importance of Speaking Up

If you are a teen who is struggling with your mental health, please know that you are not alone. There are many people who can help you. Please don't be afraid to speak up and ask for help.

You can contact Childline or another teen mental health service. You can also talk to your parents, a trusted adult, or a teacher.

There is no shame in seeking help for your mental health. In fact, it is one of the bravest things you can do. So please, don't hesitate to reach out for help. You deserve to be happy and healthy.


Thanks for reading! See you next week!!!

BTW, to help with the load of writing 3 posts a week I’ll be using Bard, an experimental AI by google to help me fact-check and organise my content. This blog is a very persoal ad deliberate endeavor of mine and I want it to be as good as possible for you all to enjoy.

BTW, to help with the load of writing 3 posts a week I’ll be using Bard, an experimental AI by google to help me fact-check and organise my content. This blog is a very persoal ad deliberate endeavor of mine and I want it to be as good as possible for you all to enjoy.
Reply 14
Congratulations on finishing your goal for the week.:biggrin:
Also, thankyou for sharing this with us.
Thanks for creating my request!
Original post by EnigmaChess
Thanks for creating my request!

No problem:thumbsup:
Let me know if you have any other requests.
I'll be focusing on Lucid dreaming on Monday.
I still haven't figured out what to focus on for Wednesday and Friday so any requests would be appreciated.
Hello TSR!

Have you ever tried Lucid Dreaming?

Lucid dreaming is the ability to be aware that you are dreaming while you are dreaming. This means that you can control your actions and the environment around you. Lucid dreaming can be a fun and exciting experience, and it can also be used for self-exploration and problem-solving. Scientists have actually been able to objectively demonstrate that people do, infact, lucid dream. They did this with the help of fMRIs and some really tired people.

Fun fact: About 20-30% of the human population are natural lucid dreamers. Do any of you fall in that category? I don’t!😢

Unfortunately, like all things, lucid dreaming does have a dark side: some lucid dreamers have reported that they sometimes have a hard time distinguishing reality from the dream and in some cases, this could be taken as a mental illness. I imagine it would be like having to actually live through Inception (the 2010 movie with DiCaprio, you guys know it right?).

However, I still find the topic really interesting so I will ontinue to discuss it.

WARNING: Readers are advised to dream at their own risk!

lol.


How to Lucid Dream

There are a number of techniques that you can use to lucid dream. Some of the most common techniques include:

- Reality testing: This involves checking to see if you are dreaming by performing reality checks throughout the day. For example, you could try pinching your nose and see if you can still breathe through it. If you can, then you are probably dreaming.

- Dream journaling: This involves writing down your dreams as soon as you wake up. This will help you to remember your dreams more clearly and to identify patterns in your dreams.

- Mnemonic induction of lucid dreams (MILD): This technique involves repeating a mantra to yourself before you go to sleep, such as "I will know I am dreaming."

- Wake back to bed (WBTB): This technique involves waking up after 5-6 hours of sleep and then staying awake for 20-30 minutes before going back to sleep. This increases your chances of having a lucid dream.

Benefits of Lucid Dreaming

There are many benefits to lucid dreaming. Some of the most common benefits include:

- Increased self-awareness: Lucid dreaming can help you to become more aware of your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. This can be helpful for personal growth and development.

- Problem-solving: Lucid dreaming can be used to solve problems in your waking life. For example, you could use lucid dreaming to practice a difficult skill or to come up with new ideas.

- Creativity: Lucid dreaming can help you to tap into your creativity. You could use lucid dreaming to write stories, design new inventions, or simply explore your imagination.

- Fun and excitement: Lucid dreaming can be a lot of fun. It's an opportunity to experience new things and to have adventures that you could never have in the real world.

How to Start Lucid Dreaming

If you're interested in learning how to lucid dream, there are a few things you can do to get started:

- Do your research: There are a number of books and websites that can teach you about lucid dreaming.
- Practice reality testing: This is one of the most important techniques for lucid dreaming. Practice reality testing throughout the day so that you will be able to do it in your dreams and still be able to know when you're awake.
- Keep a dream journal: This will help you to remember your dreams more clearly and to identify patterns in your dreams.
- Be patient: It takes time and practice to learn how to lucid dream. Don't get discouraged if you don't have a lucid dream right away. Just keep practicing and you will eventually be successful.

Conclusion

Lucid dreaming is a fascinating and powerful phenomenon. If you're interested in learning how to lucid dream, there are a number of techniques that you can use. With practice, you could even enter Dr. Strange’s mirror dimension!!! Or study for tests while your body sleeps; that’s what I would do.

See you on Wednesday!
Reply 18
Original post by PiltoverQueen
Hello TSR!

Have you ever tried Lucid Dreaming?

Lucid dreaming is the ability to be aware that you are dreaming while you are dreaming. This means that you can control your actions and the environment around you. Lucid dreaming can be a fun and exciting experience, and it can also be used for self-exploration and problem-solving. Scientists have actually been able to objectively demonstrate that people do, infact, lucid dream. They did this with the help of fMRIs and some really tired people.

Fun fact: About 20-30% of the human population are natural lucid dreamers. Do any of you fall in that category? I don’t!😢

Unfortunately, like all things, lucid dreaming does have a dark side: some lucid dreamers have reported that they sometimes have a hard time distinguishing reality from the dream and in some cases, this could be taken as a mental illness. I imagine it would be like having to actually live through Inception (the 2010 movie with DiCaprio, you guys know it right?).

However, I still find the topic really interesting so I will ontinue to discuss it.

WARNING: Readers are advised to dream at their own risk!

lol.


How to Lucid Dream

There are a number of techniques that you can use to lucid dream. Some of the most common techniques include:

- Reality testing: This involves checking to see if you are dreaming by performing reality checks throughout the day. For example, you could try pinching your nose and see if you can still breathe through it. If you can, then you are probably dreaming.

- Dream journaling: This involves writing down your dreams as soon as you wake up. This will help you to remember your dreams more clearly and to identify patterns in your dreams.

- Mnemonic induction of lucid dreams (MILD): This technique involves repeating a mantra to yourself before you go to sleep, such as "I will know I am dreaming."

- Wake back to bed (WBTB): This technique involves waking up after 5-6 hours of sleep and then staying awake for 20-30 minutes before going back to sleep. This increases your chances of having a lucid dream.

Benefits of Lucid Dreaming

There are many benefits to lucid dreaming. Some of the most common benefits include:

- Increased self-awareness: Lucid dreaming can help you to become more aware of your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. This can be helpful for personal growth and development.

- Problem-solving: Lucid dreaming can be used to solve problems in your waking life. For example, you could use lucid dreaming to practice a difficult skill or to come up with new ideas.

- Creativity: Lucid dreaming can help you to tap into your creativity. You could use lucid dreaming to write stories, design new inventions, or simply explore your imagination.

- Fun and excitement: Lucid dreaming can be a lot of fun. It's an opportunity to experience new things and to have adventures that you could never have in the real world.

How to Start Lucid Dreaming

If you're interested in learning how to lucid dream, there are a few things you can do to get started:

- Do your research: There are a number of books and websites that can teach you about lucid dreaming.
- Practice reality testing: This is one of the most important techniques for lucid dreaming. Practice reality testing throughout the day so that you will be able to do it in your dreams and still be able to know when you're awake.
- Keep a dream journal: This will help you to remember your dreams more clearly and to identify patterns in your dreams.
- Be patient: It takes time and practice to learn how to lucid dream. Don't get discouraged if you don't have a lucid dream right away. Just keep practicing and you will eventually be successful.

Conclusion

Lucid dreaming is a fascinating and powerful phenomenon. If you're interested in learning how to lucid dream, there are a number of techniques that you can use. With practice, you could even enter Dr. Strange’s mirror dimension!!! Or study for tests while your body sleeps; that’s what I would do.

See you on Wednesday!

Yep, I'm still interested in this. It is amazing. I can't believe this but this is probably the best store of this sort of knowledge anywhere.

I naturally lucid dream occasionally but often times it is not nearly as useful as you said it could be. More often than not the dream just goes against my will or does not react the way it's meant to. And sometimes I think I messed up big time in my dream, like got in real trouble with my dad, and even tho in the dream I know it's a dream, when I wake up I start thinking how dead I am. It's creepy 🙃. However I would love to be able to do my sixth form transition work in my dreams 😁.

Thank you!
(edited 9 months ago)
I once lucid dreamed. I can't remember what it was about but it was a nightmare. It was one of those repetitive nightmares I used to get so I could tell that it wasn't real and had a bit of control but I usually wake up shortly after realising I'm dreaming.
I do lucid dream sometimes but only when I have a nightmare and even then, I'm only aware it's a dream. I don't really have any control. Does that count?

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