The Student Room Group

Pros and cons of second year credit university transfer

Hi I am currently studying an undergraduate degree (1st year) through my college but it feels like I am just back at college. I commute there twice a week and it's just a building that's part of the college, I feel really isolated and am regretting going here as I am not getting any of the social aspects of university. I love the course just not the university. I've been looking into campus universities and found several I like so have booked open days.

The only problem is I am not sure whether to leave my current university and take a gap year working so I can start fresh next September as a first year on a campus university or whether I should stay at my current university for a year and do a second year credit transfer. My only worry with doing a second year transfer is that everyone in my classes would have known each other for a year and I know the 2nd year workload is more full on so I may not get the social experiences I would have in year 1.

Any advice would be appreciated, also the campus university I really like is Edge Hill so if anyone has been/goes there I would love to hear what your experience has been :smile:
Reply 1
First off, you need to contact the Admissions Team at the uni you're interested in to find out of they would accept you into L5 directly. This will be the biggest influence on the decision you take (whether to start again or complete L4).
Reply 2
Thank you, I should've added that I've already done this and all the replies said I'd need to submit a UCAS application and select 2nd year entry so they could assess whether my current degree programme is close enough to theirs. My main question is whether I'd be able to 'fit in' if I transferred to year 2 as people in my classes would've known each other for a year and I'm keen to gain the social side of university eg. freshers, going out, joining societies etc but I wasn't sure if this would be harder to achieve in year 2
Original post by cheadle
First off, you need to contact the Admissions Team at the uni you're interested in to find out of they would accept you into L5 directly. This will be the biggest influence on the decision you take (whether to start again or complete L4).
Reply 3
You are right to wonder about this but a couple of things to be aware of. First, you may not be the only fresh face in L5 - there may be others joining directly, others returning after an interruption of study, etc. Second, if the cohort is quite big then it may be the case that existing students only know a small number of people from their L4 project/seminar groups. L5 is where module choice increases and students begin to mingle with people they don't know or people from other courses.If you do end up joining L5 directly, and the cohort is quite small, I would hope that you would be allocated a student mentor for the first few weeks (this is something to ask about).
(edited 5 months ago)
Reply 4
Thank you :smile:
Original post by cheadle
You are right to wonder about this but a couple of things to be aware of. First, you may not be the only fresh face in L5 - there may be others joining directly, others returning after an interruption of study, etc. Second, if the cohort is quite big then it may be the case that existing students only know a small number of people from their L4 project/seminar groups. L5 is where module choice increases and students begin to mingle with people they don't know or people from other courses.If you do end up joining L5 directly, and the cohort is quite small, I would hope that you would be allocated a student mentor for the first few weeks (this is something to ask about).
Original post by jessfensome29
Hi I am currently studying an undergraduate degree (1st year) through my college but it feels like I am just back at college. I commute there twice a week and it's just a building that's part of the college, I feel really isolated and am regretting going here as I am not getting any of the social aspects of university. I love the course just not the university. I've been looking into campus universities and found several I like so have booked open days.

The only problem is I am not sure whether to leave my current university and take a gap year working so I can start fresh next September as a first year on a campus university or whether I should stay at my current university for a year and do a second year credit transfer. My only worry with doing a second year transfer is that everyone in my classes would have known each other for a year and I know the 2nd year workload is more full on so I may not get the social experiences I would have in year 1.

Any advice would be appreciated, also the campus university I really like is Edge Hill so if anyone has been/goes there I would love to hear what your experience has been :smile:


It's understandable that you're feeling isolated and considering a change. Here are some factors to weigh when making your decision:

Social Experience: Starting fresh in the first year at a campus university could provide a richer social experience, as everyone is new and looking to make friends. However, transferring into the second year might still offer opportunities to socialize and engage with classmates.

Academic Load: Consider the workload and curriculum differences between the first and second years. If the second year is significantly more challenging, it might impact your ability to participate in social activities.

Gap Year: Taking a gap year can provide valuable life experiences and potentially enhance your university application. However, it might be harder to transition back to academic life after a year away.

Edge Hill: Research extensively about Edge Hill University. Look for student testimonials, campus life, and available support services. Visit the campus if possible during open days to get a feel for the environment.

Talk to Current Students: If you can, talk to students currently attending Edge Hill. They can provide insights into the social scene, workload, and overall university experience.

Career Implications: Consider how each choice aligns with your long-term career goals. Some fields value continuous academic progression, while others focus more on skills and experience.

Ultimately, trust your instincts and choose the path that aligns best with your personal and academic goals. Don't hesitate to seek guidance from teachers, counselors, or mentors who know you well.

Good Luck!
Fatima
LSBU Rep

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