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How do I apply for a dual degree?

How could I do a dual degree consisting of biochemistry and molecular biology/pharmacology? I would like to apply to universities like Bristol or Manchester and do a dual degree there
Original post by EvanE
How could I do a dual degree consisting of biochemistry and molecular biology/pharmacology? I would like to apply to universities like Bristol or Manchester and do a dual degree there

What you're talking about is called a "joint honours" degree, where some modules come from one subject and some come from another (normally related) subject.

These come in two types. If the course name is described as "A and B" then subjects A and B are equally weighted (50:50). If the course name is described as "A with B" then subject A is the primary focus of the degree, with subject B less so (perhaps 75:25, although this can vary).

So check the web sites of your target unis to see what joint honours courses they offer. Each will have its own UCAS course code, which is what you enter in your UCAS application.
Original post by EvanE
How could I do a dual degree consisting of biochemistry and molecular biology/pharmacology? I would like to apply to universities like Bristol or Manchester and do a dual degree there

Hi @EvanE

Honestly, as both subject areas you are interested in are so similar, a lot of biochemistry degrees will contain modules on molecular biology and pharmacology and vice versa, as the topics are closely linked. I'd recommend looking at degrees with any of those titles at a wide range of universities and looking at the modules to find e.g. a biochemistry degree with several modules on pharmacology and drug kinetics/development, or a pharmacology degree with a good basis of biochemistry and molecular biology.

Good luck with applications!
Rebecca (Lancaster Student Ambassador)
Reply 3
Hi @EvanE I'm sharing some key points with you I hope it will help
To pursue a dual degree in biochemistry and molecular biology/pharmacology at universities like Bristol or Manchester:

Research dual degree programs on university websites.

Check admission requirements and deadlines.

Prepare and submit a strong application.

Craft a compelling personal statement.

Obtain letters of recommendation.

Be ready for potential interviews.

Explore financial aid options.

Stay informed about any updates from the universities.

Original post by EvanE
How could I do a dual degree consisting of biochemistry and molecular biology/pharmacology? I would like to apply to universities like Bristol or Manchester and do a dual degree there

The UK does not on the whole have dual degrees in the sense of earning two degrees at the same time. They have instead, as above, joint honours degrees where you study in one degree, two subjects (or sometimes more), often in equal proportion (but sometimes in unequal proportion as a major/minor split of 75/25% or similar). Note that I suspect there are few if any joint honours degrees in the subjects you have stated.

Firstly, biochemistry and molecular biology are effectively different names for the same degree programme in the UK. Biochemistry degrees here are courses in molecular and cell biology - they are not degrees in biological chemistry. They are also normally offered by departments of biological sciences or similar.

Secondly there is considerable overlap between biochemistry/molecular biology and pharmacology, so much of what you study in one course you would study in the other and vice versa. So there isn't really any reason to have a joint honours in the course as any joint honours degree between the two subjects would end up being largely similar to a student doing a single honours in either one and taking their optional module allocations tailored towards the other subject. It's usually possible to take pharmacology options on a biochemistry degree and vice versa at most (albeit possibly not all) universities.

So really you just need to pick one or the other and you'll cover the breadth of both if you choose relevant options at a uni that allows you to do so. You will need to check what options are available on each course at the different unis offering them, and there may be small differences depending on which you do in terms of e.g. which modules you have lab work for and what the nature of your final year dissertation/project will look like.

Also worth noting essentially any career a pharmacology graduate could go into, a biochemistry/molecular biology graduate could also go into. Outcomes are going to be essentially identical between the two degree courses.
Original post by EvanE
How could I do a dual degree consisting of biochemistry and molecular biology/pharmacology? I would like to apply to universities like Bristol or Manchester and do a dual degree there

Hey!

I’m Oliver and am currently a fourth year in natural sciences which is a very flexible combined degree where you can study pathways across two or three different departments. At Lancaster there are so many different pathways to choose from across all branches of chemistry, physics, maths, biology, geography and psychology, just to name a few. I am currently studying on the synthetic chemistry and biochemistry pathways and really love the balance this gives me! Each university will do pathways slightly differently and a have a varied range of possible combinations so definitely check that out on the relevant websites. The full list of pathways and entry requirements for Lancaster can be found here: https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/natural-sciences/

There is also the option to alter you pathway choices as you progress through your degree. For me this was extremely valuable as I was able to drop my physical chemistry pathway after first year to allow for a greater focus on biochemistry.

One of the best things about natural sciences is the vast range of experiences you get and people you meet. Since you study alongside the single honours students across multiple departments, you get to see so many more faces and there is never a lonely lecture. It’s also great to see how all the different sciences interlink and you can often apply something you learnt in one subject to one of your other pathways which is fascinating!

Hope that is helpful and best of luck with your decision 😊Feel free to ask me any other questions if you have any
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Oliver (Student Ambassador)

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