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Cramming

I need to cram. Mocks start next week. How do I go about this? My grades are low and I need to get them up. I am doing Biology, Chemistry and Psychology.

Don’t tell me there’s no point in cramming, it’s my only option.
Reply 1
hey, unfortunately i don't do bio or psych but for chem, i think the best thing to do for organic is go through the reaction pathways, there are specific mind maps you can find online per exam board that have the reactants and conditions listed as well, as well as some fill in the blanks, or you could even make your own, cause those are the basis of most the organic papers i've found, also making sure you know the mechanisms (directions of arrows too as they can mark down for those).
then for physical/inorganic recap of trends across/down the periodic table & definitions rates of reaction + enthalpy/entropy are always useful to know the precise definitions as they ask them sometimes + they're helpful constructing equations too :smile: (i personally like the PMT definition booklets on the a level module pages). mol calculation you need to do question practise on as theres not much else you can do for those
hopefully that's a bit of help, obviously work on what you need to most but this is what's helped me during mock revision :smile:
Original post by sea bee
I need to cram. Mocks start next week. How do I go about this? My grades are low and I need to get them up. I am doing Biology, Chemistry and Psychology.

Don’t tell me there’s no point in cramming, it’s my only option.

for psychology, focus on 16 marker essay plans for now - make sure you all have the content necessary for each theory and explanation so that if they were to throw a 16 marker in the test, you would know how to answer it
Reply 3
Original post by sea bee
I need to cram. Mocks start next week. How do I go about this? My grades are low and I need to get them up. I am doing Biology, Chemistry and Psychology.

Don’t tell me there’s no point in cramming, it’s my only option.

I'd highly recommend making flashcards and purely doing those. Don't bother with making any notes, just make flashcards on all the things you are not tip-top with (if you have time, make flashcards on every bit of content there is). If you can memorise all of the content, that should hopefully get you by for these mocks. For Biology, Miss Estruch's videos are great (you can even watch them on 1.5x speed if you're really tight on time). If you find you have more time, try apply the content with some practice questions. Try not to overstress yourself though, prioritise your health! Good luck :smile:
Sadly, I don't do any of your subjects. However, I am an expert on last-minute cramming. So what I'd advise is to grab a friend and hop on a call with them, then go to a physics and math tutor and find your subject, then go through testing each other on the detailed notes version for all possible topics that could show up. This works because you already have the knowledge stored passively in your long-term memory. So when it's refreshed, you will transfer it to your short-term memory and just make it easier for the exam as you cover all the content and understand all the gaps you forgot, so you can focus slightly more on those to the point they become your expertise . After this, just do a quick run-through of the exam structure, and you should be chilling for an easy A* (which works every time). Also, if your exam board has them look at examiner reports, it just helps give a quick overview of what common misconceptions occur and what the best students do for full marks in more depth than your teachers will go into.
Reply 5
Original post by MP_25
hey, unfortunately i don't do bio or psych but for chem, i think the best thing to do for organic is go through the reaction pathways, there are specific mind maps you can find online per exam board that have the reactants and conditions listed as well, as well as some fill in the blanks, or you could even make your own, cause those are the basis of most the organic papers i've found, also making sure you know the mechanisms (directions of arrows too as they can mark down for those).
then for physical/inorganic recap of trends across/down the periodic table & definitions rates of reaction + enthalpy/entropy are always useful to know the precise definitions as they ask them sometimes + they're helpful constructing equations too :smile: (i personally like the PMT definition booklets on the a level module pages). mol calculation you need to do question practise on as theres not much else you can do for those
hopefully that's a bit of help, obviously work on what you need to most but this is what's helped me during mock revision :smile:

This is very helpful, thanks so much :biggrin:

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