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    (Original post by J-SP)
    There are probably a few thousand jobs that pay that amount. But there are hundreds of thousands of graduates - both from the UK and the EU (and even beyond - considering those high paying jobs can often be filled by non-EU applicants through work permits).

    The reality is less than 3% of UK graduates will earn over £35k when they leave university.

    This place has got a higher proportion of people who are clearly career focused and ambitious, but the reality is the majority of people are likely to be disappointed if they expect a salary of £35k or above within a year of graduating.


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    Do you have stats/a distribution to back that? Would be interested in seeing it.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Do you have stats/a distribution to back that? Would be interested in seeing it.

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    Chart 2 - https://www.hesa.ac.uk/sfr217#sfr217chart2

    Taking into account this only represents those students who are in full-time employment, so does not take into account those who are unemployed or working part-time, the percentage is likely to be even lower than 3%.
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    I don't think simplicity and stress-free go hand in hand in a single job unless you have in-demand skills. What do you plan to do when you graduate? Will you actively search for something that you like or will you just live at home?
    Depends what each individual finds simple and stress free. For example most mundane and monotonous jobs I personally would do (mentally) quite well in, because the routine stops me feeling stressed. I think the most important thing for me in a job would be being able to get on well with the people around me and not being in a high stress fast paced "rat race" environment.

    I don't plan to do particularly skilled work until I can figure out what I'm doing with my life to be honest. Because at this point there is very little I enjoy, so I'm unsure what route to take.

    I'm considering doing some "live-in" unskilled work in Europe short term as a chance to see the world a little while still earning money.

    I don't plan to live with my mum if that is what you meant by live at home.

    Basically at the moment mentally I am a complete mess.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Chart 2 - https://www.hesa.ac.uk/sfr217#sfr217chart2

    Taking into account this only represents those students who are in full-time employment, so does not take into account those who are unemployed or working part-time, the percentage is likely to be even lower than 3%.

    I took a look at their '3 years on' data, and I found something pretty interesting: 3 years after graduating, of the sample of graduates in full time work (~64k) they had, ~26% were on £30k or more vs ~10% in the 6 months after graduating version.

    But there might be sample bias at work there, so not fully sure.

    Source: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/dlhelong0809_intro


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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I took a look at their '3 years on' data, and I found something pretty interesting: 3 years after graduating, of the sample of graduates in full time work (~64k) they had, ~26% were on £30k or more vs ~10% in the 6 months after graduating version.

    But there might be sample bias at work there, so not fully sure.

    Source: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/dlhelong0809_intro


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    Still shows the vast majority will not be earning over £30k and that's after three years of working!

    There are bound to be some issues with the data (there usually is), but this is one of the more accurate ways of looking at the issue compared to other headline stats that are used.

    I think the issue is more with the "sample" of answers you would get from this site. I suspect that would be skewed to a certain demographic more than the HESA data.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    You said 'on qualification' which is after 2 years of training, hence the £30k+ range. I'm well aware most Scottish firms pay in the £18 to low £20s for first year trainees.

    Yeah, I understand that but it's quite rare to train 'in-house'. Most often you'd train in private practice (at a firm) then qualify as a solicitor before moving in-house. Hence why it's a good idea to find firms with decent practice areas surrounding healthcare.

    As for £60k 5+ years after qualifying, that seems somewhat reasonable but I'm not sure whether in-house salaries ramp up as much as private practice ones do.

    EDIT: Ok, it's more £45-55k in-house in Scotland after 5 years.
    Yeah I would train within a firm and after a few years I would move to in house work.

    I am hoping to eventually take a conversion course for English law or to take the bar exam for America, so I do not plan on working in Scotland for the rest of my career.

    Yeah traineeships in Scotland are usually in the low 20s however in some of the larger firms it can extend to the higher end of the 20s.

    It is not a career I have chosen for money, so long as I am earning an amount that will afford me a comfortable life then I am happy.
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    Degree: Depends on results day - Currently opted for Biochem but potentially looking at Comp Sci
    Jobs/Careers of Interest: Startup, Tech Startup, Freelance Programming
    Graduate Salary Expected: >40,000 in 3-4 years after graduating.
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    (Original post by High Stakes)
    Degree: Depends on results day - Currently opted for Biochem but potentially looking at Comp Sci
    Jobs/Careers of Interest: Startup, Tech Startup, Freelance Programming
    Graduate Salary Expected: >40,000 in 3-4 years after graduating.
    Startup and Tech Startup? I thought the former assumes it's tech.. It's rare to find high growth, early non-tech startups.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Startup and Tech Startup? I thought the former assumes it's tech.. It's rare to find high growth, early non-tech startups.

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    Yeah, they are quite rare. Option is still open though and I've seen a few pop up here and there so it's all good experience to try and get involved with any business-responsibility.

    I'm planning on trying to get as much experience as possible before even trying to start one from scratch. I've planned it out for a bit now and I have a general direction of how I'm gonna go about doing things.
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    (Original post by Jbaby98)
    Ya its bad now but I am hoping the industry picks up in a few years time when I graduate. From what I gather, this happens once every decade or so.
    The oil industry will never go back to how it used to be. If you want a totally future proof job where you could very likely enjoy a great salary and good working hours, I would aim to become a mega programmer.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Chart 2 - https://www.hesa.ac.uk/sfr217#sfr217chart2

    Taking into account this only represents those students who are in full-time employment, so does not take into account those who are unemployed or working part-time, the percentage is likely to be even lower than 3%.
    That data is self-reported. Not very reliable and obviously biased.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Still shows the vast majority will not be earning over £30k and that's after three years of working!

    There are bound to be some issues with the data (there usually is), but this is one of the more accurate ways of looking at the issue compared to other headline stats that are used.

    I think the issue is more with the "sample" of answers you would get from this site. I suspect that would be skewed to a certain demographic more than the HESA data.
    That's the vast majority of people who chose to take the survey. I think this data only makes sense if you provide the percentage of UK grads that fill out the surveys.
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    That's the vast majority of people who chose to take the survey. I think this data only makes sense if you provide the percentage of UK grads that fill out the surveys.
    That is provided in the data.

    Like most reports, it doesn't provide a complete picture. But it is still a lot more reliable than the headline stats that often get thrown about which is based on far more restrictive sets of data.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Startup and Tech Startup? I thought the former assumes it's tech.. It's rare to find high growth, early non-tech startups.

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    Would you consider a Tech Startup yourself, if the opportunity arose?


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    (Original post by JP298)
    Would you consider a Tech Startup yourself, if the opportunity arose?


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    Absolutely! Especially in a product manager role or like a data scientist role. I'm actually thinking about applying to Google's early internship (first year or 2nd year of a four year course) scheme or a startup to see what tech is all about in first year.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Absolutely! Especially in a product manager role or like a data scientist role. I'm actually thinking about applying to Google's early internship (first year or 2nd year of a four year course) scheme or a startup to see what tech is all about in first year.
    They do early internships? I had no idea! That's convenient!
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    Degree: Electronic Engineering
    Jobs/Careers of Interest: Electronic Engineer hopefully in computer hardware design
    Graduate Salary Expected: ~28k (haven't looked much into this)
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    Degree: Economics BSc
    Jobs/Careers of Interest: Economic analysis (public or private sector), something policy-orientated would be good.
    Graduate Salary Expected: I believe the GES fast track scheme is £27k and the Bank of England's graduate scheme is a little bit below that, but both of those are very competitive schemes to get into. On the other hand, these are both public sector schemes, so I wouldn't expect comparable private sector schemes to be miles below that. Money isn't my number one priority anyhow.
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    (Original post by KatieBlogger)
    You won't get funded for a psychology degree and it would be useless anyway since you couldn't even be a counsellor (never mind psychiatrist) with that degree alone.

    As for the job, be an adult and decline it and tell your mother why.

    And you might wanna lower your expectations for 30k when you don't even know what job you want.

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    I realise I won't get funding and I don't have a plan for my future, all I know is I would like to go back to uni and do psychology so I'm going to make it happen. I know this sounds incredibly silly and a waste of time and money but I can't see myself being comfortable doing anything else. I don't think 30k is unrealistic at all if worse comes to worst I'm sure I can do a pgce/law/a grad job.

    And for me rejecting this job would mean having my mum literally disown me which honestly I just don't want
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    (Original post by Hra)
    I realise I won't get funding and I don't have a plan for my future, all I know is I would like to go back to uni and do psychology so I'm going to make it happen. I know this sounds incredibly silly and a waste of time and money but I can't see myself being comfortable doing anything else. I don't think 30k is unrealistic at all if worse comes to worst I'm sure I can do a pgce/law/a grad job.

    And for me rejecting this job would mean having my mum literally disown me which honestly I just don't want
    1. Teachers don't start on £30k
    2. If these 'routes' are backups, you'll have a tough time landing them. The competition for law/top grad jobs is intense, you need to be quite committed if you want to stand a chance in the recruitment processes.

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