TSR Med Students' Society (TSR Meds) Watch

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ThisLittlePiggy
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#8021
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#8021
But why does it increase? What is the purpose?

immune system does not rule.The cardiovascular and endocrine systems rule.

word.
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Wangers
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#8022
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(Original post by ThisLittlePiggy)
Guys and Gals, does anyone know the role of fibrinogen in inflammation and how it goes about its role?

I know it is used to produce fibrin and therefore clots but to what end?

Can't really find a straight answer on the web or in my notes.
This is probably far too simplistic and wrong, but my fresher guess would be:
Fibrinogin->fibrin-> clotting.

Therefore no outporing of blood from the cut when the inflammation reaction takes hold? I seem to remember the inflammation reaction is essentially ILs going crazy? *and then blood flow and immune response is promoted.
Having said that, I think theres 2 clotting pathways? It sticks because asperin works one way and theres another way.....

* instead of GS we had to do a research project for L6 (yr12?) and I ended up doing immune cascade :yep:
That was possibly entirely useless.
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Spencer Wells
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(Original post by Wangers)
This is probably far too simplistic and wrong, but my fresher guess would be:
Fibrinogin->fibrin-> clotting.

Therefore no outporing of blood from the cut when the inflammation reaction takes hold? I seem to remember the inflammation reaction is essentially ILs going crazy? *and then blood flow and immune response is promoted.
Having said that, I think theres 2 clotting pathways? It sticks because asperin works one way and theres another way.....

* instead of GS we had to do a research project for L6 (yr12?) and I ended up doing immune cascade :yep:
That was possibly entirely useless.
I'm pretty sure (though correct me if I'm wrong, I haven't done it in a wee while) that aspirin inhibits neither the intrinsic or extrinsic pathway - it stops thromboxane A2 production, and is therefore anti-platelet, not anti-clotting.
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AEH
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Spencer is right on the Aspirin bit. Although all this was a while back now.
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crazyhelicopter
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#8025
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#8025
Aspirin blocks TXA2 preventing platelet activation and so the clotting cascade.

The way I remember it Fibrinogen is converted to Fibrin by Thrombin and Fibrin causes cross linking and stabilisation of clots- this may be wrong though
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fairy spangles
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(Original post by crazyhelicopter)
The way I remember it Fibrinogen is converted to Fibrin by Thrombin and Fibrin causes cross linking and stabilisation of clots- this may be wrong though

yeh thats what i said.
i think.
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Renal
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#8027
i R SPESHUL.

Or at least I might be if I can complete this ******* special circs form before half four. :s:
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Saffie
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(Original post by AEH)
I told you it was a bit rough, he does lighten up if you do well and answer questions. But yes, he is scary sometimes. Definitely go to every single one of his outpatient clinics. I missed one and still got nailed for it.
I said 'hi' from you, today. He asked how you're getting on and said you were really intelligent but really nervous and worked yourself into a flap :p: I think he's warming to me now.

Attempted to take ABGs today and failed, but took a history.. need to do the resp exam tomorrow and prepare to be grilled on friday ward round.. fun times.
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AEH
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#8029
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Of course I worked myself into a flap, I was utterly bloody terrified for six weeks non-stop. ABGs are worth doing whilst you're there because there's so many good ones to practice with, you probably won't get that chance again. Friday ward rounds....ahh the memories. Also the fear. Memories of fear.
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Saffie
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(Original post by AEH)
Of course I worked myself into a flap, I was utterly bloody terrified for six weeks non-stop. ABGs are worth doing whilst you're there because there's so many good ones to practice with, you probably won't get that chance again. Friday ward rounds....ahh the memories. Also the fear. Memories of fear.
I dont understand why everyones so scared of him? I guess I'm just waiting for him to lose his temper then??

There so arent good ABGs there, everyones old with awful circulation, its hard enough feeling the radial pulse let alone hitting it!
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visesh
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I don't think we are formally taught how to do ABGs until 5th year, but our junior docs seem rather keen on us trying out procedures we haven't been taught (but with appropriate training and supervision, of course :P)

My consultant wants me to present 3 cases to him at rounds tomorrow AM, but he's only got about 5 patients in an examinable state. It's going to be an early morning (or a late, late night...!)
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AEH
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#8032
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Trust me, there'll be some good hits there. Just keep trying and you'll get it done. Remember, there's no points for speed but there's all the credit in the world for a first-time sample (For your own ego and for the patient's comfort).

Get used to doing procedures in the See One, Do One, Teach One style because there's so many jobs with different styles, equipment and variants to each that you just can't have the luxury of a clinical skills lab session for each of them. Assist things as far as possible, like chest drains and lumbar punctures, and when you notice variation between patients and doctors, ask why they're doing it. In a nice way rather than an accusing way of course. This will get you familiar with the procedure in greater detail and teach you the fundamentals behind it rather than a simple cook-book methodology.
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Demon_AS
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#8033
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#8033
I reckon you London medics should have your own separate thread for chat :p:.

ABGs look and sound painful... :eek:
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Hygeia
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#8034
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(Original post by Demon_AS)
I reckon you London medics should have your own separate thread for chat :p:.

ABGs look and sound painful... :eek:
they are incredibly painful... especially when it takes 3 doctors 6 needles and 45 mins to get a post-exercise ABG...
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j00ni
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#8035
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I don't think they're that bad - had 3rd years practice on me and despite multiple attempt it's not really that aweful, I have had more pain and bruising from poor cannulation.

But then I quite like the sensation of needles
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Demon_AS
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#8036
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#8036
Weirdo :ninja:

:p:.
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Helenia
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#8037
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(Original post by visesh)
I don't think we are formally taught how to do ABGs until 5th year, but our junior docs seem rather keen on us trying out procedures we haven't been taught (but with appropriate training and supervision, of course :P)
Yeah, you'll get taught during MAD in stage 2. I still haven't done it on a real patient though. :o:

I still haven't decided where to apply for foundation jobs. I don't want to be grown up (though having enough money for food AND rent would be nice).
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visesh
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(Original post by Helenia)
Yeah, you'll get taught during MAD in stage 2. I still haven't done it on a real patient though. :o:

I still haven't decided where to apply for foundation jobs. I don't want to be grown up (though having enough money for food AND rent would be nice).
Oooh, one of my FY1s knows you:ninja:

Of the 3 patients I presented this morning, two have passed away before lunch. It just makes you think....
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Saffie
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(Original post by visesh)
Oooh, one of my FY1s knows you:ninja:

Of the 3 patients I presented this morning, two have passed away before lunch. It just makes you think....
I haven't presented a patient yet The one I should be presenting tomorrow is probably getting discharged today, so I'll probably get in trouble for that.:rolleyes:

When I turned up at clinic today, I was just given a patient's folder and told to call them and take them into the other room and take a history. :eek2: Would've been good if they had something wrong with them. Well something with symptoms/that she knew about.
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Fluffy
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The prescribing exam was horrific! Thank the lord our Trusts aren't being informed! As the School wouldn't allow negative marking, the module lead went for all or nothing - so you could get 5/6ths of an answer right and get 0!!! Eeep!
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