ImABigOldTurd
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Report Thread starter 7 years ago
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Hey year 13 reading about Alzheimer's and one of the hypotheses relating to cause is that of mutations of genes encoding for PS-1 and PS-2, two proteins which function as part of the "gamma-secretase transmembrane protease complex". That's basically a complex whose function is cleaving ("cutting up" or breaking down I guess) transmembrane proteins, referred to as intrinsic proteins at A level.

My question is why is there the need to break down these proteins? I'm not sure if they're the proteins of the same cell containing the gamma-secretase complex or if they maybe just play a role in digestion.

Could anyone help? >.<
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Katy4341
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Report 7 years ago
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I can't give you a full answer as i'm just a first year biomed with just an interest in the topic BUT I do know that the exact functions associated with PS proteins have not been fully characterised yet. Once they are cleaved they develop 2 different polypeptides. PS1 is required for proper formation of the axial skeleton and is involved in normal neurogenesis and survival brain regions.They have also been proposed to function in the control of apoptosis (cell death). As well as the former, researchers believe they might induce intercellular signalling.

If you have a look through some journals/undergrad textbooks you may find some more information
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ImABigOldTurd
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Report Thread starter 7 years ago
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(Original post by Katy4341)
I can't give you a full answer as i'm just a first year biomed with just an interest in the topic BUT I do know that the exact functions associated with PS proteins have not been fully characterised yet. Once they are cleaved they develop 2 different polypeptides. PS1 is required for proper formation of the axial skeleton and is involved in normal neurogenesis and survival brain regions.They have also been proposed to function in the control of apoptosis (cell death). As well as the former, researchers believe they might induce intercellular signalling.

If you have a look through some journals/undergrad textbooks you may find some more information
Thanks
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