2.2 BSc degrees - let’s discuss Watch

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I often find it is those doing a BA that claim 2.1’s are ridiculously easy to get. I have just finished doing a psychology BSc at UEA, and even 2.2’s were difficult - a grade I received many times. I was able to get maybe 8 2.1’s altogether, but the majority were 2.2’s (I also had a lot of personal problems which I won’t delve into) but In my third year, I did an outside of school BA module, and for a very minimal amount of effort I got a 78 in my essay?! For putting in literally no extra work than my BSc modules. I am likely to get a 2.2 overall sadly, as my dissertation was a bit of a flop, but I think awareness of the differences in difficultly between BA’s and BSc’s needs to be made more prominent. A 2.2 BSc from a good uni, in my opinion, is just as much of an achievement as a 2.1 BA. What are people’s thoughts?
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(Original post by beckyyc17)
I often find it is those doing a BA that claim 2.1’s are ridiculously easy to get. I have just finished doing a psychology BSc at UEA, and even 2.2’s were difficult - a grade I received many times. I was able to get maybe 8 2.1’s altogether, but the majority were 2.2’s (I also had a lot of personal problems which I won’t delve into) but In my third year, I did an outside of school BA module, and for a very minimal amount of effort I got a 78 in my essay?! For putting in literally no extra work than my BSc modules. I am likely to get a 2.2 overall sadly, as my dissertation was a bit of a flop, but I think awareness of the differences in difficultly between BA’s and BSc’s needs to be made more prominent. A 2.2 BSc from a good uni, in my opinion, is just as much of an achievement as a 2.1 BA. What are people’s thoughts?
You do realise that BA and BSc are merely arbitrary degree titles that mean very little - they're just the letters that come before your degree subject. For example, did you know that many universities offer a BA in Physics. The difference between BAs and BScs are merely the elective subjects you choose to take alongside your main degree subject and the course content is largely identical between BAs and BScs for the same subject.
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(Original post by Cubone-r)
You do realise that BA and BSc are merely arbitrary degree titles that mean very little - they're just the letters that come before your degree subject. For example, did you know that many universities offer a BA in Physics. The difference between BAs and BScs are merely the elective subjects you choose to take alongside your main degree subject and the course content is largely identical between BAs and BScs for the same subject.
Yes, and the BA in Physics is less science based. I find it hard to believe that with the insane amount of statistics, biology and science my course entailed, that a BA would have been just as difficult.
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(Original post by Cubone-r)
You do realise that BA and BSc are merely arbitrary degree titles that mean very little - they're just the letters that come before your degree subject. For example, did you know that many universities offer a BA in Physics. The difference between BAs and BScs are merely the elective subjects you choose to take alongside your main degree subject and the course content is largely identical between BAs and BScs for the same subject.
Also, your degree obviously worked differently to mine. Psychology you are given all compulsory modules until third year, where you have to start to specialise in types of psychology. You don’t get a ‘base’ subject?!
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(Original post by beckyyc17)
Yes, and the BA in Physics is less science based. I find it hard to believe that with the insane amount of statistics, biology and science my course entailed, that a BA would have been just as difficult.
(Original post by beckyyc17)
Also, your degree obviously worked differently to mine. Psychology you are given all compulsory modules until third year, where you have to start to specialise in types of psychology. You don’t get a ‘base’ subject?!
Again, read what I said... most BAs and BScs for the same subject will be largely the same in which modules you can select. Perhaps your degree did work differently, but for the most part you usually get given a choice in what modules you take in your final year.

I know for sure that Oxford and the ancient Scottish universities work like this where you take your chosen degree subject, but you also get to choose a couple of elective to subjects or "short options" as they're sometimes called to study alongside your degree in your first and second year, and sometimes even final year.
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(Original post by Cubone-r)
Again, read what I said... most BAs and BScs for the same subject will be largely the same in which modules you can select. Perhaps your degree did work differently, but for the most part you usually get given a choice in what modules you take in your final year.

I know for sure that Oxford and the ancient Scottish universities work like this where you take your chosen degree subject, but you also get to choose a couple of elective to subjects or "short options" as they're sometimes called to study alongside your degree in your first and second year, and sometimes even final year.
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Right well read that, as I described with my course, all modules you pick with a BSc are taken within the school of psychology and very maths/science heavy. So how is there no difference??
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e^iπ
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(Original post by beckyyc17)
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Right well read that, as I described with my course, all modules you pick with a BSc are taken within the school of psychology and very maths/science heavy. So how is there no difference??
perhaps you just find maths more difficult and do perform less well in the BSc version than in the BA version?
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There's obviously problems with this sort of assertion, because universities like Oxbridge and some Scottish unis don't really have the more common BA/BSc route.

But, if you're talking about humanities/arts vs science/quantitative social sciences, then I'd disagree with you. On average, the former category produces less Firsts than the latter. In something mathsy, it's much easier to get a good grade if you understand the content compared to a similar level of understanding in a qualitative subject because one is objective and the other isn't. One misinterpretation of an essay question will ruin your entire grade.
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(Original post by Exceptional)
There's obviously problems with this sort of assertion, because universities like Oxbridge and some Scottish unis don't really have the more common BA/BSc route.

But, if you're talking about humanities/arts vs science/quantitative social sciences, then I'd disagree with you. On average, the former category produces less Firsts than the latter. In something mathsy, it's much easier to get a good grade if you understand the content compared to a similar level of understanding in a qualitative subject because one is objective and the other isn't. One misinterpretation of an essay question will ruin your entire grade.
But psychology incorporates both statistics and essay writing. A psychological report is divided into an introduction/literature review, a methodology, results section and then discussion. It is all extremely standardised and one wrong result or misinterpretation of a result can substantially undermine any work (a bit like what happened to me in my dissertation lol)
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(Original post by beckyyc17)
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Right well read that, as I described with my course, all modules you pick with a BSc are taken within the school of psychology and very maths/science heavy. So how is there no difference??
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You really need to look at university websites - for example, this is taken from Aberdeen and I know the other Scottish universities run their degrees like this. In these cases, the only difference is your elective subjects.

So, BSc students will take Psychology along with two other science subjects (e.g., Biology and Chemistry)
MA or BA students will take arts subjects alongside Psychology (e.g., Philosophy and a Language). It is important to note that these modules do not count toward your degree grade.

However, in your final honours year(s) there is no difference between which modules a BA and BSc student are able to take, so they could end up taking the exact same modules.

Yes, some universities do run their BA v. BScs degrees differently and may perhaps limit their BA and BScs modules to particular aspects. However, because a lot of universities do not differ between BA and BSc content/modules you cannot just say someone's BA is easier because they may have taken the exact same modules as a student with a BSc in the same subject. The degree title is not important, it is the modules which one takes that are and which demonstrate your skills and knowledge.
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(Original post by Exceptional)
There's obviously problems with this sort of assertion, because universities like Oxbridge and some Scottish unis don't really have the more common BA/BSc route.

But, if you're talking about humanities/arts vs science/quantitative social sciences, then I'd disagree with you. On average, the former category produces less Firsts than the latter. In something mathsy, it's much easier to get a good grade if you understand the content compared to a similar level of understanding in a qualitative subject because one is objective and the other isn't. One misinterpretation of an essay question will ruin your entire grade.
Also Statistics aren’t as objective as you think. You have to decide yourself which statistical test is correct (there’s often no correct answer), find out specifically the correct way to go about it (there are a HUGE amount of options), choose which data to present, how to present it etc.
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(Original post by Exceptional)
There's obviously problems with this sort of assertion, because universities like Oxbridge and some Scottish unis don't really have the more common BA/BSc route.

But, if you're talking about humanities/arts vs science/quantitative social sciences, then I'd disagree with you. On average, the former category produces less Firsts than the latter. In something mathsy, it's much easier to get a good grade if you understand the content compared to a similar level of understanding in a qualitative subject because one is objective and the other isn't. One misinterpretation of an essay question will ruin your entire grade.
Just because the humanities/arts awards less 1st class degrees than STEM is not indicative of the former being more difficult, maybe the average intelligence for humanities is just less than STEM?
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(Original post by Cubone-r)
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You really need to look at university websites - for example, this is taken from Aberdeen and I know the other Scottish universities run their degrees like this. In these cases, the only difference is your elective subjects.

So, BSc students will take Psychology along with two other science subjects (e.g., Biology and Chemistry)
MA or BA students will take arts subjects alongside Psychology (e.g., Philosophy and a Language). It is important to note that these modules do not count toward your degree grade.

However, in your final honours year(s) there is no difference between which modules a BA and BSc student are able to take, so they could end up taking the exact same modules.

Yes, some universities do run their BA v. BScs degrees differently and may perhaps limit their BA and BScs modules to particular aspects. However, because a lot of universities do not differ between BA and BSc content/modules you cannot just say someone's BA is easier because they may have taken the exact same modules as a student with a BSc in the same subject. The degree title is not important, it is the modules which one takes that are and which demonstrate your skills and knowledge.
I fail to see your point. Every year I had at uni I HAD to take all psychology subjects, so how can you possibly tell me my degree consisted of exactly the same modules? I was only allowed to do an out of school module in third year due to a timetable clash+ personal problems.
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(Original post by Cubone-r)
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You really need to look at university websites - for example, this is taken from Aberdeen and I know the other Scottish universities run their degrees like this. In these cases, the only difference is your elective subjects.

So, BSc students will take Psychology along with two other science subjects (e.g., Biology and Chemistry)
MA or BA students will take arts subjects alongside Psychology (e.g., Philosophy and a Language). It is important to note that these modules do not count toward your degree grade.

However, in your final honours year(s) there is no difference between which modules a BA and BSc student are able to take, so they could end up taking the exact same modules.

Yes, some universities do run their BA v. BScs degrees differently and may perhaps limit their BA and BScs modules to particular aspects. However, because a lot of universities do not differ between BA and BSc content/modules you cannot just say someone's BA is easier because they may have taken the exact same modules as a student with a BSc in the same subject. The degree title is not important, it is the modules which one takes that are and which demonstrate your skills and knowledge.
Are you also aware you’re literally comparing a masters with a bachelors?
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You are trying to claim that a BSc degree is much harder than a BA degree on the basis that one individual (yourself) did a single module from a BA degree and found it easy? Any scientific education you received as part of your degree has been lost on you.

It is also worth pointing out that What Uni? states 89% of people on your degree get a 2:1 or above. Your course is not difficult, it is just that you are at the bottom of your cohort.
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(Original post by Sulfolobus)
You are trying to claim that a BSc degree is much harder than a BA degree on the basis that one individual (yourself) did a single module from a BA degree and found it easy? Any scientific education you received as part of your degree had been lost on you.

It is also worth pointing out that What Uni? states 89% of people on your degree get a 2:1 or above. Your course is not difficult, it is just that you are at the bottom of your cohort.
All these BA students getting rowdy af. I love it
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(Original post by beckyyc17)
All these BA students getting rowdy af. I love it
The person you quoted did have a point though
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(Original post by e^iπ)
The person you quoted did have a point though
Not really. Taking statistics at face value is not reflective of the course content - I know many people on my course who paid for private tutors. I simply cannot afford to do that
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(Original post by beckyyc17)
All these BA students getting rowdy af. I love it
If you are going to bring the STEM/humanity rivalry into this, psychology is by no stretch of the imagination a true science.
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(Original post by beckyyc17)
I fail to see your point. Every year I had at uni I HAD to take all psychology subjects, so how can you possibly tell me my degree consisted of exactly the same modules? I was only allowed to do an out of school module in third year due to a timetable clash+ personal problems.
(Original post by beckyyc17)
Are you also aware you’re literally comparing a masters with a bachelors?
Let me break this down for you. I have an M.A. (Hons) degree in Psychology from Glasgow, which was a 4-year degree. The BSc degree is also 4-years as standard at Scottish universities. The ancient Scottish universities give master's degrees to their undergraduates in the college of arts and social science due to ancient tradition - so in Scotland the MA and BSc are comparable. An MA is basically a BA in Scotland, but not at the same time.

In my first two years I took all of the compulsory psychology modules, as well as modules in philosophy and sociology. I then had to gain entry into my final 2 honours years for psychology; in which I had to get 60%+, so if we are going to play your game, most psychology students in England only have to gain 40% to pass into their honours years, so who had the more rigorous degree?

Then in my final two honours years I solely studied psychology. That's how it works. It's different at different universities as I said, so saying BAs are better than BScs is rather foolish - you need to delve into the specific modules that students have studied, which most of the time are the same between BA and BSc students studying the same subject.
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