Have waits for GP appointments got longer? Watch

Spirithorse
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How long do you wait to see your GP?
Have waits actually got longer?
Is it because demands on GPs have increased?
Is it safe to wait weeks for an appointment?
Are all practices affected?
Is there anything that will help?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-46485457
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Johnny English
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(Original post by Spirithorse)
How long do you wait to see your GP?
Have waits actually got longer?
Is it because demands on GPs have increased?
Is it safe to wait weeks for an appointment?
Are all practices affected?
Is there anything that will help?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-46485457
I wait norally 24 to 36 hours for appointment
It's not bad around here . Very few move in or out of the area and migration isn't an issue . However there's still 250,000 nationally coming in every year and the wait to see your doctor is bound to become longer .The best solution is to not allow any more in to put yet more strain on the essential services .
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username4408542
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Demand has definitely increased, and mass immigration carries a heavy weight of blame for that. Anyone who says otherwise is either foolish, deluded, or bigoted. (Or any combination of the three.)

This, of course, coupled with the fact that a great amount of time and effort is required to be expended before one can become a GP, is sure to impact negatively upon demand.
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Just my opinion
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Yes they have got worse.
A week is not unusual.
You are either cured or dead by the time you see the GP.
One of the main reasons A&E is swamped.
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Claire461
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3 weeks here for a non-urgent appointment. We have a ‘Ask the Doctor’ facility on the surgery website with email and password which you can use to message the doctors and put in symptoms etc and there is a rota for doctors to read them and respond with advice to either come in or other appropriate advice.
Surgery is full and currently not taking any more patients. If you are a patient who constantly doesn’t turn up for appointments you can be asked to register with another GP.
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Claire461
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We have no A&E at our local hospital, only Minor Illness and Minor Injuries unit. Always mad busy. One of my daughters is Ward Sister on Cardiac but does weekends sometimes on MIMI.
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Pathway
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I see my GP quite regularly. I don't see anyone else there though due to my issues being too complex and when I've tried seeing other GPs there they get overwhelmed with me so it can take some time to get appointments with him specifically, but that's usually because he's taking time off.
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CTLeafez
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I live in a small village but an appointment with a Doctor will take 2-3 weeks and one with a nurse 1 week.

It really isn't ideal when you're in need of medical assistance but isn't severe enough for A&E and you're having to wait 3/4 of a month to see someone..:
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gjd800
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Our quacks has a couple of afternoons a week where you can just turn up; boss. But tit wasn't always that way. Waits have got longer, I dunno how anyone could say othrwise with a straight face, really.
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katf
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I have several ongoing health problems. I find that I have to wait weeks to see a GP. A lot of the time, I'm asked to wait for weeks before they'll even look at my ankle, so I have to go to A and E because I'm unable to walk even with my stick and I'm in so much pain I can't do anything. Whereas, if I'm seen promptly, I experience less pain and I can get the necessary treatment.

I have people in my family with severe asthma. One person in particular has it so severely that she's been hospitalised twice this year. She was recently asked to wait two weeks for a GP appointment when she thinks she has a chest infection. My partner, a nurse, reckons she probably does based on the rattle in her chest. In two weeks, she'll be back in hospital and on oxygen, IV antibiotics, and high dosage prednisolone. If she's treated now, then she'll need to take time off work, but she'll be at home. Consequently, it'll save the NHS thousands. But that won't happen.
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DSilva
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(Original post by Johnny English)
I wait norally 24 to 36 hours for appointment
It's not bad around here . Very few move in or out of the area and migration isn't an issue . However there's still 250,000 nationally coming in every year and the wait to see your doctor is bound to become longer .The best solution is to not allow any more in to put yet more strain on the essential services .
Around 13% of NHS staff are immigrants. We have a severe shortage in nurses and doctors and they help make up for it.

The issue with the NHS is no immigration, its chronic underfunding.
Last edited by DSilva; 9 months ago
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Etomidate
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(Original post by You Reeker)
Demand has definitely increased, and mass immigration carries a heavy weight of blame for that. Anyone who says otherwise is either foolish, deluded, or bigoted. (Or any combination of the three.)
I disagree, to be honest.

On the whole, migrants are a young, healthy and working population who by definition demand little from the health service.

Our native population, on the other hand, is ageing with significantly higher complex co-morbidity and poly-pharmacy. These are the patients that require extended appointment times in order to juggle multiple social and medical issues (as well as the physical logistics of actually getting them seated in the GP room and on the bed for examination!).

When you go to A&E, it's not migrants lining the corridors. It's native octogenarians. Ironically it's migrants who keep our NHS afloat with staff.
Last edited by Etomidate; 9 months ago
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jameswhughes
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A three week wait to see a doctor, if you manage to get through the two hour telephone hold time to speak to a thick as **** receptionist first.
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DSilva
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(Original post by jameswhughes)
A three week wait to see a doctor, if you manage to get through the two hour telephone hold time to speak to a thick as **** receptionist first.
It's almost as if underfunding a service land treating the staff like cr*p, leaves it in a weaker position...
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LordBerkut
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I wouldn't say it was longer at my GP. You phone at exactly 7:59:59 and are somehow number 45 in a queue. If you can persist through 20 minutes of brain destroying music you'll usually get an appointment that day.

The quality of GP-ing has definitely declined though. They just shrug and give you ibuprofen.
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NishaaaR
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Longest I've had to wait for a GP appointment was 6 weeks.
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jameswhughes
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(Original post by DSilva)
It's almost as if underfunding a service land treating the staff like cr*p, leaves it in a weaker position...
Can you provide evidence that it’s underfunded?
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Just my opinion
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(Original post by CTLeafez)
I live in a small village but an appointment with a Doctor will take 2-3 weeks and one with a nurse 1 week.

It really isn't ideal when you're in need of medical assistance but isn't severe enough for A&E and you're having to wait 3/4 of a month to see someone..:
"The envy of the world"
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by Etomidate)
I disagree, to be honest.

On the whole, migrants are a young, healthy and working population who by definition demand little from the health service.

Our native population, on the other hand, is ageing with significantly higher complex co-morbidity and poly-pharmacy. These are the patients that require extended appointment times in order to juggle multiple social and medical issues (as well as the physical logistics of actually getting them seated in the GP room and on the bed for examination!).

When you go to A&E, it's not migrants lining the corridors. It's native octogenarians. Ironically it's migrants who keep our NHS afloat with staff.
Agree, and if people would stop going to the GP over stupid things like a cold that would help
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CoolCavy
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My home GP was horrendous, could never get an appointment and then when you finally did they would do nothing and palm you off. Went several times about my ears, they did notjhing until i had an awful ear infection where i could hardly walk in a straight line.
My uni GP is much better, amazing in fact, can usually get an appointment on the same day and they have really good prebookables. I think this is because as a uni GP we arent swamped by old people needing constant medical attention
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