I can't choose between 2 very different degrees..

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hanjiluvr
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Hi! I am very conflicted about which degree I want to chose, and they are both very different.

I am very interested in a politics and economics degree, as learning about social issues, how the world functions and how we can make changes for the better is so interesting. Plus, there a very wide variety in jobs, and many opportunities to travel.

However, I am also interested in a psychology and neuroscience degree, seeing how our brain functions and how we as humans process things. I also enjoy maths and essay writing, which I feel this course will have a mixture of. Although I find this more interesting, I am not necessarily interested in a job as a scientist.

I am so confused and I really can't decide...does anyone have any advice? Or any particular pros or cons about studying these subjects? Thank you
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username5853119
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(Original post by hanjiluvr)
Hi! I am very conflicted about which degree I want to chose, and they are both very different.

I am very interested in a politics and economics degree, as learning about social issues, how the world functions and how we can make changes for the better is so interesting. Plus, there a very wide variety in jobs, and many opportunities to travel.

However, I am also interested in a psychology and neuroscience degree, seeing how our brain functions and how we as humans process things. I also enjoy maths and essay writing, which I feel this course will have a mixture of. Although I find this more interesting, I am not necessarily interested in a job as a scientist.

I am so confused and I really can't decide...does anyone have any advice? Or any particular pros or cons about studying these subjects? Thank you
Hello. There is lots to consider about these. Firstly, definitely check to see where you are looking to study- the options of specific modules each year for the course you choose. I studied Social Policy and Government at LSE. Each year we had "outside options" so could pick pretty much anything, I did some criminology, economics statistics and psychology modules, all very interesting 😊 I think either of your choices and the rationale you have said behind for both, sound good, sounds like you will succeed in either route. Follow what you are most passionate about, that's my genuine advice. Passion keeps your interest alive when you have readings, essays, etc. Then into the job, passion fuels you to succeed. When you are in a career you enjoy, that motivation counts for a lot 😊 Ask yourself what do you see yourself doing? Best of luck with everything
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hanjiluvr
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(Original post by Rmarm)
Hello. There is lots to consider about these. Firstly, definitely check to see where you are looking to study- the options of specific modules each year for the course you choose. I studied Social Policy and Government at LSE. Each year we had "outside options" so could pick pretty much anything, I did some criminology, economics statistics and psychology modules, all very interesting 😊 I think either of your choices and the rationale you have said behind for both, sound good, sounds like you will succeed in either route. Follow what you are most passionate about, that's my genuine advice. Passion keeps your interest alive when you have readings, essays, etc. Then into the job, passion fuels you to succeed. When you are in a career you enjoy, that motivation counts for a lot 😊 Ask yourself what do you see yourself doing? Best of luck with everything
Thank you so much for your response! I'm just a bit stressed because the deadline for my schools application is very soon, and I haven't even picked a course, let alone written the personal statement! But I'll definitely take on board your advice

I want to ask, how was your overall experience at LSE? I was considering applying for LSE but I haven't heard very positive reviews on tsr... such as the environment being a lot more competitive than other unis, with a business-like atmosphere, and very cold students.
Last edited by hanjiluvr; 1 month ago
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username5853119
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(Original post by hanjiluvr)
Thank you so much for your response! I'm just a bit stressed because the deadline for my schools application is very soon, and I haven't even picked a course, let alone written the personal statement! But I'll definitely take on board your advice

I want to ask, how was your overall experience at LSE? I was considering applying for LSE but I haven't heard very positive reviews on tsr... such as the environment being a lot more competitive than other unis, with a business-like atmosphere, and very cold students.
Aw. I remember the feeling! Set yourself some time aside for it one evening, relax and get in the zone! You will do it I absolutely loved LSE personally, it is amazing for being able to learn from amazing people and go to so many amazing events etc with the top professionals of the fields. I'm from a state school, and you definitely notice the disproportionate amount of foreign (very rich) and privately educated students. But it just depends what fazes you I guess and what drives you. There is a sense of competition, but I never brought into it, I was there for me and I adored my time there and made some amazing friends and went some amazing places.
Good luck with everything you want to achieve
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hanjiluvr
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(Original post by Rmarm)
Aw. I remember the feeling! Set yourself some time aside for it one evening, relax and get in the zone! You will do it I absolutely loved LSE personally, it is amazing for being able to learn from amazing people and go to so many amazing events etc with the top professionals of the fields. I'm from a state school, and you definitely notice the disproportionate amount of foreign (very rich) and privately educated students. But it just depends what fazes you I guess and what drives you. There is a sense of competition, but I never brought into it, I was there for me and I adored my time there and made some amazing friends and went some amazing places.
Good luck with everything you want to achieve
Thank you so much honestly!!
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TheSuckUpStudent
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Try looking into interdisciplinary ‘social science’ degrees! E.g. https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-st...l-sciences-bsc
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franksfoot1
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Hey! I, myself, am considering taking chemsitry at uni although I know I want to end up in finance, and not in a science based job.

I would recommend writing down your likes, dislikes, what you want from a career and what you definitely don't want. Also if you have a certain career in mind, look at how to get into it. Not all careers require a certain degree, whereas some might. I even took some personality tests such as: Myers Briggs and the Holland code test. These can help to give you clear ideas about yourself and suited career choices. Although beware, they are not always going to be accurate, and are only tools to give yourself guidance when looking at degrees and careers!

I'm in the same situation as you right now, so take my advice as you will haha, good luck!
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artful_lounger
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You might be interested in the Economics, Psychology and Philosophy degree offered at Warwick. Philosophy acts as a bridge between the theoretical aspects of economics and psychology, and there are a lot of applied areas of overlap between economics and psychology in terms of e.g. decision/rational choice theory (also overlaps with philosophy), behavioural economics, and the psychology of economic life.
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hanjiluvr
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
You might be interested in the Economics, Psychology and Philosophy degree offered at Warwick. Philosophy acts as a bridge between the theoretical aspects of economics and psychology, and there are a lot of applied areas of overlap between economics and psychology in terms of e.g. decision/rational choice theory (also overlaps with philosophy), behavioural economics, and the psychology of economic life.
Actually, I did take a look at that, and it sounds very interesting! However, as I guess its three different disciplines in one subject - and I haven't taken any of these subjects at A-Level- I'm afraid I'll struggle getting a good grade and dealing with the workload.
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hanjiluvr
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(Original post by franksfoot1)
Hey! I, myself, am considering taking chemsitry at uni although I know I want to end up in finance, and not in a science based job.

I would recommend writing down your likes, dislikes, what you want from a career and what you definitely don't want. Also if you have a certain career in mind, look at how to get into it. Not all careers require a certain degree, whereas some might. I even took some personality tests such as: Myers Briggs and the Holland code test. These can help to give you clear ideas about yourself and suited career choices. Although beware, they are not always going to be accurate, and are only tools to give yourself guidance when looking at degrees and careers!

I'm in the same situation as you right now, so take my advice as you will haha, good luck!
I see, thank you! It's hard to pick one solid degree when you have a lot of interests, so I'll definitely be doing a joint honours.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by hanjiluvr)
Actually, I did take a look at that, and it sounds very interesting! However, as I guess its three different disciplines in one subject - and I haven't taken any of these subjects at A-Level- I'm afraid I'll struggle getting a good grade and dealing with the workload.
You would be taking the same number of credits as a single honours student so the workload would be the same as studying any other degree.

In terms of not having studied the subjects before, that is not necessarily an issue. No single honours degrees in the UK in any of the three areas require you to have previously studied them to A-level. Economics degrees usually require A-level Maths or equivalent, and psychology degrees usually require or prefer a scientific background, but outside of that there isn't any specific requirements. Philosophy courses take in a wide range of students from a variety of backgrounds and presuppose no specific philosophy content.

If you think the course is interesting then I don't think either of those are reasons to not consider applying to it!
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hanjiluvr
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
You would be taking the same number of credits as a single honours student so the workload would be the same as studying any other degree.

In terms of not having studied the subjects before, that is not necessarily an issue. No single honours degrees in the UK in any of the three areas require you to have previously studied them to A-level. Economics degrees usually require A-level Maths or equivalent, and psychology degrees usually require or prefer a scientific background, but outside of that there isn't any specific requirements. Philosophy courses take in a wide range of students from a variety of backgrounds and presuppose no specific philosophy content.

If you think the course is interesting then I don't think either of those are reasons to not consider applying to it!
Oh I see! well then I think my chosen A-levels actually fit quite nicely? I take maths, chemistry and English literature!

Do you think taking a PPE course would not give me as many opportunities as pure economics though? I know economics has a lot of job opportunities, but I feel as though as a single honours degree it is quite dry.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by hanjiluvr)
Oh I see! well then I think my chosen A-levels actually fit quite nicely? I take maths, chemistry and English literature!

Do you think taking a PPE course would not give me as many opportunities as pure economics though? I know economics has a lot of job opportunities, but I feel as though as a single honours degree it is quite dry.
By PPE do you mean politics, philosophy and economics, or the EPP course at Warwick (economics, philosophy, and psychology)? The answer is essentially the same but it's worth bearing in mind they are quite different courses with different emphases on both the philosophy and economics sides as well as the third subject being different!

In any case, it won't really make any difference, except there are a small number of roles in the civil service which require your degree have at least 50% economics content. Other than those roles, it doesn't matter so much. A PPE (or EPP, maybe) degree might be somewhat less quantitative than a single honours economics degree but for most grad roles that won't make a difference (maybe just a small range of more technical finance roles, which probably prefer STEM grads anyway). For anything else, from general business/management grad schemes, accounting, investment banking, media, and civil service roles other than the economic service/diplomatic service economics stream, it doesn't matter compared to your work experience etc.
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hanjiluvr
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
By PPE do you mean politics, philosophy and economics, or the EPP course at Warwick (economics, philosophy, and psychology)? The answer is essentially the same but it's worth bearing in mind they are quite different courses with different emphases on both the philosophy and economics sides as well as the third subject being different!

In any case, it won't really make any difference, except there are a small number of roles in the civil service which require your degree have at least 50% economics content. Other than those roles, it doesn't matter so much. A PPE (or EPP, maybe) degree might be somewhat less quantitative than a single honours economics degree but for most grad roles that won't make a difference (maybe just a small range of more technical finance roles, which probably prefer STEM grads anyway). For anything else, from general business/management grad schemes, accounting, investment banking, media, and civil service roles other than the economic service/diplomatic service economics stream, it doesn't matter compared to your work experience etc.
Oh sorry, I was confused! I haven't heard of the EPP course, but I'll definitely consider it!! thank you
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Maxxx17
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As I know that a large stipend is paid for technical specialties. If you are thinking about choosing a field that pays more. Not where you like it best. I think you'll be fine in technical fields. It's mostly in heating or air conditioning. It's a tough specialty of course. You have to be good at it. Working so to speak. But you'll get a good stipend. That in the future at work the salary will be high on https://www.hvacschools411.com/pros-...e-hvac-career/. Because now it's a sought-after job.
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