How do I get into the same University as my girlfriend

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Mcurtisbailey
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#1
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#1
Me and my girlfriend have been together for 3 years and want to move in together at uni and ideally be at the same one. The application success rate is already low as it is, I was just wondering if anyone had any tips on how to get into the same one/ one in the same area and we could live in the middle?
Help would be greatly appreciated!
Last edited by Mcurtisbailey; 3 months ago
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Mcurtisbailey
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(Original post by noeminvm)
The best way is to match your backup unis as well. If one of you gets in to your first choice and the other doesn't, whoever got in can always reject the offfer and go to the backup uni instead.

Hope this helped!
Thank you,
Are you saying that we are both very likely to get into our backup unis?
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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My advice, to the contrary, would be don't do it.

You're young. Yeah, you've been together for 3 years, but being together at school/college is nothing like an adult relationship, and nothing like being together when you're at uni/living together/have adult responsibilities.

So many relationships fail at university or in early adulthood. Yours might not, but the fact is that the odds are against you - and basing your educational decisions around your relationship is not the right thing to do I'm afraid.

You should each go to a uni that is good for you educationally. Meet up in the holidays and odd weekends, use social media/messenger/skype to stay in touch in the week. If your relationship truly is strong, you will get through it fine. But just imagine you get to uni and end up splitting up in the first term. You're both then stuck somewhere you might not really have wanted to be.

I've seen it happen, to people who you really wouldn't have thought would split up.
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Admit-One
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#4
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#4
(Original post by noeminvm)
The best way is to match your backup unis as well. If one of you gets in to your first choice and the other doesn't, whoever got in can always reject the offfer and go to the backup uni instead.

Hope this helped!
If the Firm choice accepts them, then the Insurance offer is removed by UCAS. Declining an accepted place just puts you in Clearing where the Insurance course may or may not be available. So potentially a risky route.

Mcurtisbailey - your best bet is to find the course that you are most suited for and can put in the most competitive application for. No point aiming for something with low entry requirements if you're miserable on it for 3+ years.
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Mcurtisbailey
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#5
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(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
My advice, to the contrary, would be don't do it.

You're young. Yeah, you've been together for 3 years, but being together at school/college is nothing like an adult relationship, and nothing like being together when you're at uni/living together/have adult responsibilities.

So many relationships fail at university or in early adulthood. Yours might not, but the fact is that the odds are against you - and basing your educational decisions around your relationship is not the right thing to do I'm afraid.

You should each go to a uni that is good for you educationally. Meet up in the holidays and odd weekends, use social media/messenger/skype to stay in touch in the week. If your relationship truly is strong, you will get through it fine. But just imagine you get to uni and end up splitting up in the first term. You're both then stuck somewhere you might not really have wanted to be.

I've seen it happen, to people who you really wouldn't have thought would split up.
Hi,
Thanks for your advice but we are both prepared for living together and have for months at a time so know what it's like to be in each others company in living conditions; it works very well.
We both want good educations as I want to do psychology and she wants to do law so both want to get into a good uni. I understand your concern, thank you anyway?
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Mcurtisbailey
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#6
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#6
(Original post by Admit-One)
If the Firm choice accepts them, then the Insurance offer is removed by UCAS. Declining an accepted place just puts you in Clearing where the Insurance course may or may not be available. So potentially a risky route.

Mcurtisbailey - your best bet is to find the course that you are most suited for and can put in the most competitive application for. No point aiming for something with low entry requirements if you're miserable on it for 3+ years.
Hi, thanks for your reply
What does this mean? What is an insurance offer and why would this mean an offer is removed?
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turkeydinosaurs
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#7
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#7
(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
My advice, to the contrary, would be don't do it.

You're young. Yeah, you've been together for 3 years, but being together at school/college is nothing like an adult relationship, and nothing like being together when you're at uni/living together/have adult responsibilities.

So many relationships fail at university or in early adulthood. Yours might not, but the fact is that the odds are against you - and basing your educational decisions around your relationship is not the right thing to do I'm afraid.

You should each go to a uni that is good for you educationally. Meet up in the holidays and odd weekends, use social media/messenger/skype to stay in touch in the week. If your relationship truly is strong, you will get through it fine. But just imagine you get to uni and end up splitting up in the first term. You're both then stuck somewhere you might not really have wanted to be.

I've seen it happen, to people who you really wouldn't have thought would split up.
Please listen to this advice. This advice is correct, even if it's not what you want to hear.

(Original post by Mcurtisbailey)
Hi,
Thanks for your advice but we are both prepared for living together and have for months at a time so know what it's like to be in each others company in living conditions; it works very well.
We both want good educations as I want to do psychology and she wants to do law so both want to get into a good uni. I understand your concern, thank you anyway?
It's less about being able to live in the same house as someone, and more about letting something as unpredictable & fugacious as a teenage relationship permanently impact your personal education. I don't need to tell you the statistical likelihood of your relationship lasting into adulthood.

Choose the best educational route for yourself, considering only yourself in that decision. Your girlfriend should do the same for herself. If your relationship is mature and sensible, you will both respect each other enough to do that. If your relationship is to last, 3 years in university will be a drop in the bucket compared to the 50 years you'll each spend in careers in part dictated by your respective educational choices.

Ask any university & careers advisor at your college. They will all tell you the exact same thing: do not choose your university based on where your friends/partners are going. When all the advisors are saying the same thing, you should probably listen to them.
Last edited by turkeydinosaurs; 3 months ago
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hungrysalamander
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#8
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#8
I would advice against applying to a university just because your girlfriend studies there. Do your own research about the courses and unis that you meet entry requirements for and that you like.
Your degree will stay with you for life, your girlfriend might not. If your relationship cannot survive after sixth form because you went to different universities then it isn't as strong as you think. On the other hand, you might end up at a uni that you hate and break up in the end which is the worst possible scenario but can't be ruled out.
Sorry if I sound harsh, it's the only way I know to get my point across as love can sometimes cause people to make the worst decisions.
Last edited by hungrysalamander; 3 months ago
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Admit-One
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#9
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#9
(Original post by Mcurtisbailey)
Hi, thanks for your reply
What does this mean? What is an insurance offer and why would this mean an offer is removed?
Once your applications have all returned a decision, you should then pick a Firm and and Insurance choice, (assuming you received 2 or more offers). Your Firm should be where you most want to end up at. Your Insurance is where you'd like to go if your Firm declines to accept you, (they can choose to accept you on results day even if you miss your offer). For most people, their Insurance choice has a lower grade requirement, but that's not mandatory.

Any other offers are discarded at that point.

To explain my correction to the above poster, an example:


  • You and your partner both choose Uni A as your Firm and Uni B as your Insurance
  • Uni A accepts you on results day
  • Uni A rejects your partner, but they are accepted by Uni B as their insurance
  • Declining your offer at Uni A at this stage does not 'release' you automatically to your offer at Uni B. That offer was removed by UCAS the moment that Uni A accepted you


You might still be able to get into Uni B by declining your place at A and then getting in via Clearing. But that's dependant on what is available on the day. If the uni is the priority and not the course, (not recommended, but may be your preference), then you may have more options.
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