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59,75% on my 2nd year of Law, 2:2 or 2:1?

Hi all, I'm studying Law at the University of Leicester and scored a 59.75% and was 0.25% shy of getting 60%, I'm pretty content with my result but not glad about being such a small margin away from an absolute 2:1.

My university does in fact bump up grades in borderline cases; however, the assessment handbook is not explicit on how it deals with 2nd-year students. It also does not explicitly state requirements, such as that (half) or (more than half) of modules must have been at 60%. Anyway, in my case, exactly half of my modules were at 60. One at 70 and one at 60, with the 2 remaining ones below 60. I'm not sure if this applies to my university, but it might be worth noting here.

I sat my exams with mitigating circumstances and was allowed extra time; one out of my 4 modules, was sat without extra time, which caused me to run out of time and rush the exam, procedural error from the uni maybe. Will this help me in any way, in my claim for a review?

I would appreciate any guidance and reassurance. Thanks for reading thus far!
2.1
Thanks, care to elaborate?

Original post by LawStudent456
2.1
Original post by Monkey-D. Luffy
Thanks, care to elaborate?



You round up a number that is 5 or above. Pretty sure this is SATs level stuff
Original post by Monkey-D. Luffy
Hi all, I'm studying Law at the University of Leicester and scored a 59.75% and was 0.25% shy of getting 60%, I'm pretty content with my result but not glad about being such a small margin away from an absolute 2:1.

My university does in fact bump up grades in borderline cases; however, the assessment handbook is not explicit on how it deals with 2nd-year students. It also does not explicitly state requirements, such as that (half) or (more than half) of modules must have been at 60%. Anyway, in my case, exactly half of my modules were at 60. One at 70 and one at 60, with the 2 remaining ones below 60. I'm not sure if this applies to my university, but it might be worth noting here.

I sat my exams with mitigating circumstances and was allowed extra time; one out of my 4 modules, was sat without extra time, which caused me to run out of time and rush the exam, procedural error from the uni maybe. Will this help me in any way, in my claim for a review?

I would appreciate any guidance and reassurance. Thanks for reading thus far!


Universities only give one classification, and that's at the end of the course. That's why there's nothing in the assessment handbook about classifications for second years -- they don't classify second years. The only thing a university considers for second years is whether or not they've met the requirements to proceed to the third year of the course.
The borderline criteria will be based around your final year and likely outline criteria for the modules i.e. level 3 & dissertation for example.

I would check if your university rounds final grades to the nearest integer or keeps them fractional. If it’s integer you have a 2.1 if it’s fractional you tracked a very high 2.2
Thanks, I'm aware the borderline criteria is primarily used for final year classifications but thought they do the same with 2nd year students as i've read on TSA.

Anyway, should i make a claim based on the fact that I was not given extra time on my first exam, when i was entitled to it? which affected my score, or is this still not likely to hold up?

So me not being boosted to 60% at 2nd year, that doesn't impede me from getting a 2:1 next year. Or am i 0,25% further away from reaching it, if that makes sense. It's 33% 2nd year and 67% 3rd year.

@martin7

The borderline criteria will be based around your final year and likely outline criteria for the modules i.e. level 3 & dissertation for example.

I would check if your university rounds final grades to the nearest integer or keeps them fractional. If it’s integer you have a 2.1 if it’s fractional you tracked a very high 2.2
Original post by Monkey-D. Luffy
Thanks, I'm aware the borderline criteria is primarily used for final year classifications but thought they do the same with 2nd year students as i've read on TSA.

Anyway, should i make a claim based on the fact that I was not given extra time on my first exam, when i was entitled to it? which affected my score, or is this still not likely to hold up?

So me not being boosted to 60% at 2nd year, that doesn't impede me from getting a 2:1 next year. Or am i 0,25% further away from reaching it, if that makes sense. It's 33% 2nd year and 67% 3rd year.

@martin7

If you want to appeal your result due to procedural error this is up to you although I don’t think your overall average is particularly relevant.

Did you appeal before the exam board? - you might have been able to make a compelling case for an uncapped resit due to the procedural error although I think the university might require you to appeal at the time of the event & probably before results are released.
I just sent an email to my Law department, I doubt they will allow for an uncapped resit and I would rather not go through another exam period again haha, just hope by some miracle they bump it up given the error. :-)

If you want to appeal your result due to procedural error this is up to you although I don’t think your overall average is particularly relevant.

Did you appeal before the exam board? - you might have been able to make a compelling case for an uncapped resit due to the procedural error although I think the university might require you to appeal at the time of the event & probably before results are released.
if the university doesn't have relevant information (e.g. not receiving extra time in error) you should notify them. if they have everything and haven't given you a classification yet there is nothing for you to do right now.
Original post by Monkey-D. Luffy
I just sent an email to my Law department, I doubt they will allow for an uncapped resit and I would rather not go through another exam period again haha, just hope by some miracle they bump it up given the error. :-)


They would be highly unlikely to have a policy that allows them to artificially boost grades retrospectively. They will have an official appeals process inline with the academic regulations and they will have to follow the regulations and what action is permitted there.

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