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University College London, University of London
University College London
London

UCL student - ask me anything

I study Spanish and French btw so anything uni-wide or related to the SELCS department.

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Reply 1
Hi, how did the university handle professor strikes? Has lesson disruption been minimised now and are lessons back to face to face?

What is your weekly schedule like?
University College London, University of London
University College London
London
Reply 2
Original post by Aufbau
Hi, how did the university handle professor strikes? Has lesson disruption been minimised now and are lessons back to face to face?

What is your weekly schedule like?

in my case a lot of my teachers were young and didn't have the money to strike - so didn't. However, for a few weeks my contact times did probably halve because of the strikes. At the minute the problem is the marking strikes - our results for some essays are way overdue. Lessons stop at the end of term 2 so don't have any at the minute, but they have been face to face all year.

I have had about 13-14 hours of contact time per week this year, which is probably more than average.
Reply 3
Original post by spicyoo
I study Spanish and French btw so anything uni-wide or related to the SELCS department.

What were your GCSE grades like? :s-smilie: How many A*'s? As?

What did you achieve in A-Level French and/or A-Level Spanish? Did you do History or Maths too? :s-smilie:

What was your offer?

If you live in the Zone 1 to 4 zones in London, you won't be eligible for UCL accommodation as an undergraduate student? :s-smilie:
Reply 4
Original post by thegeek888
What were your GCSE grades like? :s-smilie: How many A*'s? As?

What did you achieve in A-Level French and/or A-Level Spanish? Did you do History or Maths too? :s-smilie:

What was your offer?

If you live in the Zone 1 to 4 zones in London, you won't be eligible for UCL accommodation as an undergraduate student? :s-smilie:


my gcses were mostly 9s with a couple 8s, my offer was AAB, and I'm pretty sure all home undergraduates are eligible for accom
Reply 5
Original post by spicyoo
my gcses were mostly 9s with a couple 8s, my offer was AAB, and I'm pretty sure all home undergraduates are eligible for accom

Which A-Level subjects did you do and what grades did you achieve in the end? :smile:
Reply 6
Original post by thegeek888
Which A-Level subjects did you do and what grades did you achieve in the end? :smile:


Spanish, French and biology, A*, A* A
Reply 7
What is the accommodation like?
Reply 8
What extracurriculurs did you do to get accepted?
(edited 10 months ago)
Reply 9
Original post by sukhxo
What extracurriculurs did you do to get accepted?


none, that's not how the uni application system works
Reply 10
Original post by verity23
What is the accommodation like?


it's nice because it's all in central London, mine is 20 minutes walk from campus which is probably the furthest out there is for undergrad. I paid 160 a week for a non ensuite bedroom in a shared flat of 6 just off Grays Inn Road
My daughter will apply for the French and Spanish course at UCL this year. She's currently with a high school following the US curriculum, so the entry requirement for her is a score of 5 in three AP subjects with French and Spanish. If she meets this requirement, how likely is she to get accepted? How competitive is this course? Is there anything else she needs to focus on to increase the change?
Original post by Anonymous #1
My daughter will apply for the French and Spanish course at UCL this year. She's currently with a high school following the US curriculum, so the entry requirement for her is a score of 5 in three AP subjects with French and Spanish. If she meets this requirement, how likely is she to get accepted? How competitive is this course? Is there anything else she needs to focus on to increase the change?

I have no idea what any of that means because I am not American, sorry
Reply 13
Is course economics with one year abrioad 4 years or 3 years. I ask because of tuitio fees Thank you
Original post by Valjevo
Is course economics with one year abrioad 4 years or 3 years. I ask because of tuitio fees Thank you


It's a 4 year course with a reduced tuition fee to UCL but no tuition fee to the university abroad, however, you will have to pay for airfare, accommodation and food.
Original post by Anonymous
My daughter will apply for the French and Spanish course at UCL this year. She's currently with a high school following the US curriculum, so the entry requirement for her is a score of 5 in three AP subjects with French and Spanish. If she meets this requirement, how likely is she to get accepted? How competitive is this course? Is there anything else she needs to focus on to increase the change?

UCL is generally a competitive uni but equally modern languages tends to be undersubscribed as a degree programme across the UK.

Note UK unis usually give a "conditional offer" rather than an outright acceptance, and the acceptance will be subject to meeting the terms of the offer (usually something like in this case 5 in 3 APs with French and Spanish). If she achieves that after getting the offer they have to accept her. I imagine she has a good chance of getting an offer in the first place too if she has some good APs already +/- good SAT/ACT score if she's taken it (even if not a great score it looks like she can get an offer with just 3 APs for it so not a big deal!).

So probably a decent chance :smile:

They have some fairly detailed info here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international/united-states-america
(edited 2 months ago)
Reply 16
Original post by artful_lounger
UCL is generally a competitive uni but equally modern languages tends to be undersubscribed as a degree programme across the UK.

Note UK unis usually give a "conditional offer" rather than an outright acceptance, and the acceptance will be subject to meeting the terms of the offer (usually something like in this case 5 in 3 APs with French and Spanish). If she achieves that after getting the offer they have to accept her. I imagine she has a good chance of getting an offer in the first place too if she has some good APs already +/- good SAT/ACT score if she's taken it (even if not a great score it looks like she can get an offer with just 3 APs for it so not a big deal!).

So probably a decent chance :smile:

They have some fairly detailed info here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international/united-states-america

Thank you so much for your reply. I know that UCL is one of the best universities in the UK, so I guess just meeting the entry requirements wouldn't guarantee admission in general. If it's undersubscribed, does anyone who meets the entry requirement get an offer? Or do they consider other factors like GPA, extra-curricular activities, etc? For US universities, there is no such entry requirement. So, I'm confused about what that exactly means.
Since languages degrees are generally somewhat unpopular in the UK fewer people apply to them so it's relatively "easier" to get into those courses, even at quite good universities. While nothing is guaranteed I think meeting the requirements (or being predicted to meet them) while applying to an undersubscribed course like that gives a very good chance of getting a conditional offer. Of course, one needs to actually meet those requirements by the end of the school year to be able to matriculate :smile:

And yes the UK system is very different to the US system. Since students in the UK don't have a "rolling" GPA from their classes in school (their results are determined by external public exams like A-levels, GCSEs etc), and since the exams form which their grades do derive aren't held until after applying, unis in the UK do normally make those conditional offers on the basis of predicted grades.

Since there's a fair amount of uncertainty as a result most universities outside of Oxford and Cambridge realistically need to make more offers than they would anticipate having "places" for (although there are no formal restrictions on how many students unis can take outside of medicine and dentistry). Unisy know out of the number of offers they make, some will not accept choose to make it their "firm" or "insurance" offer at all (and thus decline it - you can only ultimately have 2 offers accepted in UCAS), they may make them their "insurance" choice and not their "firm" choice and if they achieve their grades will go to the other uni, some will not do as well in their exams and miss the offer and the uni may or may not feel they can accept them, some might meet their offer for the firm choice but decide not to matriculate/enrol in the end, etc. There are a lot of potential attrition points.

So really for modern languages I think usually meeting or being predicted to meet the standard entry requirements and writing a not-terrible personal statement (not necessarily outstanding) is probably going to be sufficient to be a serious contender if not get an offer.

In any event there's nothing to lose really! I suppose there's the ~£25 UCAS fee but since you have to pay that to apply through UCAS at all (regardless of which 5 unis you apply to) and it's very unlikely one would get 0/5 offers unless they completely didn't meet or couldn't meet the requirements, there's very little risk here in applying.
Reply 18
Original post by artful_lounger
Since languages degrees are generally somewhat unpopular in the UK fewer people apply to them so it's relatively "easier" to get into those courses, even at quite good universities. While nothing is guaranteed I think meeting the requirements (or being predicted to meet them) while applying to an undersubscribed course like that gives a very good chance of getting a conditional offer. Of course, one needs to actually meet those requirements by the end of the school year to be able to matriculate :smile:

And yes the UK system is very different to the US system. Since students in the UK don't have a "rolling" GPA from their classes in school (their results are determined by external public exams like A-levels, GCSEs etc), and since the exams form which their grades do derive aren't held until after applying, unis in the UK do normally make those conditional offers on the basis of predicted grades.

Since there's a fair amount of uncertainty as a result most universities outside of Oxford and Cambridge realistically need to make more offers than they would anticipate having "places" for (although there are no formal restrictions on how many students unis can take outside of medicine and dentistry). Unisy know out of the number of offers they make, some will not accept choose to make it their "firm" or "insurance" offer at all (and thus decline it - you can only ultimately have 2 offers accepted in UCAS), they may make them their "insurance" choice and not their "firm" choice and if they achieve their grades will go to the other uni, some will not do as well in their exams and miss the offer and the uni may or may not feel they can accept them, some might meet their offer for the firm choice but decide not to matriculate/enrol in the end, etc. There are a lot of potential attrition points.

So really for modern languages I think usually meeting or being predicted to meet the standard entry requirements and writing a not-terrible personal statement (not necessarily outstanding) is probably going to be sufficient to be a serious contender if not get an offer.

In any event there's nothing to lose really! I suppose there's the ~£25 UCAS fee but since you have to pay that to apply through UCAS at all (regardless of which 5 unis you apply to) and it's very unlikely one would get 0/5 offers unless they completely didn't meet or couldn't meet the requirements, there's very little risk here in applying.

Thank you so much for this detailed explanation!! UCL is her first choice. Otherwise, she would choose US universities. For admission to US universities, GPA and extra-curricular activities are considered more important than AP scores or other standardized test scores. Can I assume that GPA and extra-curricular activities are irrelevant to admission to UK universities unless they are part of the entry requirement? (For her, the entry requirement is a score of 5 in three AP subjects including French and Spanish.)
Original post by elpin
Thank you so much for this detailed explanation!! UCL is her first choice. Otherwise, she would choose US universities. For admission to US universities, GPA and extra-curricular activities are considered more important than AP scores or other standardized test scores. Can I assume that GPA and extra-curricular activities are irrelevant to admission to UK universities unless they are part of the entry requirement? (For her, the entry requirement is a score of 5 in three AP subjects including French and Spanish.)

Extracurriculars aren't anywhere near as important as in the US and most unis don't really mind overly much what you have or haven't done. A couple (Oxford and Cambridge, probably LSE, maybe Imperial and possibly UCL, although I didn't do much I don't think beyond wider reading in my subject area) do like to see so called "supercurriculars", basically extracurricular activities related to the subject being applied to (for languages I'm not too sure really what might apply).

But this can just as well be "wider reading" in your subject area (e.g. reading about literature in the target language, if not reading literature in the target language) since they know not all students have equal opportunity to pursue various "supercurricular" activities and they're very sensitive to not indirectly discriminate against students as a result (since invariably the students least able to pursue a lot of these things are the ones least likely to progress to higher education as well.

As for GPA this probably varies between unis, it might be a factor for more competitive unis and courses (e.g. ones that in the UK put some weight on GCSE grades which provide some sense of progressive achievement). But plenty are happy just to see recent/current achievement and weaker achievement earlier in high school isn't necessarily an absolute barrier. Plus as noted since language degrees in the UK tend to be undersubscribed they probably can't be that choosy in the first place!

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