The Student Room Group

Second Undergraduate Degree Funding

Hello, I am thinking of doing a second undergraduate degree and a bit confused about what funding, if any, I would be eligible to. I have tried to look around, including the relevant forum posts on here but have a few questions.

I graduated with a BA degree in philosophy a few years ago (and recieved a full tuition fee loan + a maintenance loan each year). I would now like to study for a bachelor's degree in mathematics (full-time). The gov.uk site says that,

"If you already have a degree ... You may also get limited funding if you hold an Honours degree or a higher level of qualification and start a new course. This could be a part-time Honours degree, a joint Honours degree or an Integrated Master’s degree in one of the following (or 2 if it’s a joint Honours degree): ... mathematical sciences".

This seems to say that a full-time honours degree in mathematics would be a course for which I could get some funding, but perhaps only if I do it as a joint Honours degree with another one of the listed courses/subjects?

Also, could you please explain what is meant by 'limited funding'.

My last question is with regards to funding for an integrated masters. If I were study a four-year mathematics course with an integrated masters in the fourth year, would I be entitled to normal funding in that year, as it is a higher qualification than any that I would already have?

Thank you!
Original post by zqp4
Hello, I am thinking of doing a second undergraduate degree and a bit confused about what funding, if any, I would be eligible to. I have tried to look around, including the relevant forum posts on here but have a few questions.

I graduated with a BA degree in philosophy a few years ago (and recieved a full tuition fee loan + a maintenance loan each year). I would now like to study for a bachelor's degree in mathematics (full-time). The gov.uk site says that,

"If you already have a degree ... You may also get limited funding if you hold an Honours degree or a higher level of qualification and start a new course. This could be a part-time Honours degree, a joint Honours degree or an Integrated Master’s degree in one of the following (or 2 if it’s a joint Honours degree): ... mathematical sciences".

This seems to say that a full-time honours degree in mathematics would be a course for which I could get some funding, but perhaps only if I do it as a joint Honours degree with another one of the listed courses/subjects?

Also, could you please explain what is meant by 'limited funding'.

My last question is with regards to funding for an integrated masters. If I were study a four-year mathematics course with an integrated masters in the fourth year, would I be entitled to normal funding in that year, as it is a higher qualification than any that I would already have?

Thank you!

Hi there,

Part time Mathematical science courses are an exception to previous study and equal level qualification rules if you are to attend part time.

Thanks, Clare
Reply 2
Hi Clare,


Thanks for your response.


I understand that part-time mathematical courses are an exception to the rules. My question concerned full-time courses. The government website seems to say that limited funding is available for certain full-time courses as well, since it lists joint Honours courses and integrated masters.


Could you explain what funding (if any) would be available to someone doing a joint honours degree in something like mathematics and computer science, since that seems to meet the criteria listed in the quote I provided?


And secondly, could you explain what sort of funding would be available for a student doing an integrated master's? My understanding is that someone doing a four year course with an integrated master's in the final year would get full funding in that year as if it were part of their bachelor's. Would someone get that same funding if the bachelor's tied to their integrated master's were not their first bachelor's?


Finally, could you please explain what is meant by 'limited funding'? Does this refer to a tuition or maintenance loan? And is the amount available less than what is available for first-time undergrads?


Many thanks
Original post by zqp4
Hi Clare,


Thanks for your response.


I understand that part-time mathematical courses are an exception to the rules. My question concerned full-time courses. The government website seems to say that limited funding is available for certain full-time courses as well, since it lists joint Honours courses and integrated masters.


Could you explain what funding (if any) would be available to someone doing a joint honours degree in something like mathematics and computer science, since that seems to meet the criteria listed in the quote I provided?


And secondly, could you explain what sort of funding would be available for a student doing an integrated master's? My understanding is that someone doing a four year course with an integrated master's in the final year would get full funding in that year as if it were part of their bachelor's. Would someone get that same funding if the bachelor's tied to their integrated master's were not their first bachelor's?


Finally, could you please explain what is meant by 'limited funding'? Does this refer to a tuition or maintenance loan? And is the amount available less than what is available for first-time undergrads?


Many thanks


Hi there,

You would not be eligible for the Mathematical Science course full time, it is only an exception if it is part time, this includes the integrated masters course.

Thanks, Clare
Reply 4
Hi Clare,

Thanks again for your response.

As I said, I understand that part-time courses and integrated master's in these subjects are an exception. I apologise for not being clearer. I will try to ask my main questions again more clearly.

1. Is funding available for integrated master's even when funding was not available for the bachelor's degree with which it is integrated? Or does this only apply for integrated master's that follow your first bachelor's?

2. What is 'limited funding'? My impression was that someone studying a healthcare course or a part-time course in one of the listed subjects would be entitled to the exact same funding that someone studying their first degree would be (including both tuition + maintenance). Is that right?

Thank you
Original post by zqp4
Hi Clare,

Thanks again for your response.

As I said, I understand that part-time courses and integrated master's in these subjects are an exception. I apologise for not being clearer. I will try to ask my main questions again more clearly.

1. Is funding available for integrated master's even when funding was not available for the bachelor's degree with which it is integrated? Or does this only apply for integrated master's that follow your first bachelor's?

2. What is 'limited funding'? My impression was that someone studying a healthcare course or a part-time course in one of the listed subjects would be entitled to the exact same funding that someone studying their first degree would be (including both tuition + maintenance). Is that right?

Thank you

Hi there,

Limited funding is in relation to what funding is available to each exception course, the part time funding attracts the Tuition Fee and Maintenance Loan, the amount of Maintenance Loan is dependent on the course intensity and is not available for distance learning courses unless you have a disability that prevents you from attending a course in person.

Yes, the funding will be available for the new part time exception course that are an integrated masters as part of the duration of the new course.

Thanks, Clare

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