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what is law/english lit like at uni?

As someone who is aspiring to do law, what is it like for those who are/have done this course at uni? And english lit is also another (though much less likely to choose) option, and the same question stands for this course too.

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Original post by heartz4moushi
As someone who is aspiring to do law, what is it like for those who are/have done this course at uni? And english lit is also another (though much less likely to choose) option, and the same question stands for this course too.

Hi @heartz4moushi
In undergrad I studied BA History and Law and thought it might be helpful to share my experience. BA law differs to LLB and so I am not qualified to practice law although the classes I took were the same as the classes that LLB students took and they were my classmates. Doing it the way I did meant I did not always have the overlap learning between all the classes which meant more work on occasion. The Law course is full on and there is a lot of prep work, seminar/class engagement and I had a mix of exams and assignemnts. I did enjoy the course and there is flexibility to choose some classes during your degree to focus on particular areas of interest. It is worth having a look at the applying stage to see what classes watch university offer.

I also have a friend currently studying English Lit and she really enjoys it. Depending on the university there are different modules and classes on offer to cover a wide range of genre and periods. There is a lot of reading and writing involved similar to law and a great emphasis on independent learning because as with most HASS courses your time in taught lectures/seminars is less than more practical degrees.

Best wishes for applying for whatever course you decide on!
Catherine - University of Strathclyde Student Ambassador
Original post by University of Strathclyde Student Ambassador
Hi @heartz4moushi
In undergrad I studied BA History and Law and thought it might be helpful to share my experience. BA law differs to LLB and so I am not qualified to practice law although the classes I took were the same as the classes that LLB students took and they were my classmates. Doing it the way I did meant I did not always have the overlap learning between all the classes which meant more work on occasion. The Law course is full on and there is a lot of prep work, seminar/class engagement and I had a mix of exams and assignemnts. I did enjoy the course and there is flexibility to choose some classes during your degree to focus on particular areas of interest. It is worth having a look at the applying stage to see what classes watch university offer.

I also have a friend currently studying English Lit and she really enjoys it. Depending on the university there are different modules and classes on offer to cover a wide range of genre and periods. There is a lot of reading and writing involved similar to law and a great emphasis on independent learning because as with most HASS courses your time in taught lectures/seminars is less than more practical degrees.

Best wishes for applying for whatever course you decide on!
Catherine - University of Strathclyde Student Ambassador

Hi! Thank you so much, you're experiences have most definitely been useful and thank you for taking your time out to reply to me!
Yes I've head that no Law course is easy and requires a lot of brain power and will! What were your assignments and the prep for them like? A lot of independent study I'm guessing. Also, what kind of books do you guys reads or do research from and how did you find it? And, what kind of law job do you want to get into after graduating? Like lawyer, solicitor, paralegal etc.
Thank you.
Original post by heartz4moushi
As someone who is aspiring to do law, what is it like for those who are/have done this course at uni? And english lit is also another (though much less likely to choose) option, and the same question stands for this course too.

hey if you still want a qualifying law degree (LLB) but are also interested in english lit look at the glasgow course which is common law and english lit! might be of interest.
Original post by nosleepyescoffee
hey if you still want a qualifying law degree (LLB) but are also interested in english lit look at the glasgow course which is common law and english lit! might be of interest.

what do you mean by that? they allow you to do a joint course of english + law?
Original post by heartz4moushi
Hi! Thank you so much, you're experiences have most definitely been useful and thank you for taking your time out to reply to me!
Yes I've head that no Law course is easy and requires a lot of brain power and will! What were your assignments and the prep for them like? A lot of independent study I'm guessing. Also, what kind of books do you guys reads or do research from and how did you find it? And, what kind of law job do you want to get into after graduating? Like lawyer, solicitor, paralegal etc.
Thank you.

Hi there

It is great to hear that you are looking into your career options. I am currently a third year law student at Kent. Hopefully I can provide some insights on studying a law degree. :smile:

Studying law involves a lot of reading (cases, legislations, academic journals etc.) Echoing Catherine's post, it consists of lectures and seminars where you engage in discussions about different topics.

Generally, you will take several different modules each year (some optional, some mandatory depending on the University you choose to go to). There is actually quite a lot of difference between different modules: for example family law and company law are completely different areas of law, yet they are both really interesting. If it is something you are interested in, definitely have a look at what modules Universities offer when deciding your options.

Law involves a lot of independent studying hours. Outside of the lectures and seminars, you are free to organise your schedule, and you are given a lot of responsibility. Given the amounts of reading and coursework, being organised is really important for law, and it is a skill that you develop throughout the degree. :smile:
Seminar preparation for me usually includes reading textbooks, understanding cases and legislations and answering questions based off this information. Coursework essentially build on this knowledge and you are expected to read academic journals that will support the main arguments in your essays. Academic journals can usually be found online: LexisNexis (we are given a University log in, so we can access a wide range of resources). Alternatively at our University's library. Personally I find the textbook readings more dull and prefer more opinionated academic journals. However, my friend differs from me in enjoying to learn about cases more, it is really different for everyone!

With a law degree, you can pursue a career as a solicitor or paralegal (more office based), or being a barrister (which is more court based). Of course there are many more law opportunities out there, and for non-law careers, a law qualification would certainly boost your CV.

I hope this helps. If you have any specific questions about studying law I am happy to answer them! :smile:
Chloe
University of Kent Student Rep
Reply 6
Original post by heartz4moushi
as someone who is aspiring to do law, what is it like for those who are/have done this course at uni? And english lit is also another (though much less likely to choose) option, and the same question stands for this course too.

omgg i also want to be a lawyer in the future.
Original post by University of Kent
Hi there

It is great to hear that you are looking into your career options. I am currently a third year law student at Kent. Hopefully I can provide some insights on studying a law degree. :smile:

Studying law involves a lot of reading (cases, legislations, academic journals etc.) Echoing Catherine's post, it consists of lectures and seminars where you engage in discussions about different topics.

Generally, you will take several different modules each year (some optional, some mandatory depending on the University you choose to go to). There is actually quite a lot of difference between different modules: for example family law and company law are completely different areas of law, yet they are both really interesting. If it is something you are interested in, definitely have a look at what modules Universities offer when deciding your options.

Law involves a lot of independent studying hours. Outside of the lectures and seminars, you are free to organise your schedule, and you are given a lot of responsibility. Given the amounts of reading and coursework, being organised is really important for law, and it is a skill that you develop throughout the degree. :smile:
Seminar preparation for me usually includes reading textbooks, understanding cases and legislations and answering questions based off this information. Coursework essentially build on this knowledge and you are expected to read academic journals that will support the main arguments in your essays. Academic journals can usually be found online: LexisNexis (we are given a University log in, so we can access a wide range of resources). Alternatively at our University's library. Personally I find the textbook readings more dull and prefer more opinionated academic journals. However, my friend differs from me in enjoying to learn about cases more, it is really different for everyone!

With a law degree, you can pursue a career as a solicitor or paralegal (more office based), or being a barrister (which is more court based). Of course there are many more law opportunities out there, and for non-law careers, a law qualification would certainly boost your CV.

I hope this helps. If you have any specific questions about studying law I am happy to answer them! :smile:
Chloe
University of Kent Student Rep

Thank you so much for this reply!
You explained everything so clearly, and answered all the questions I wanted to ask really😅
If you don't mind me asking, what field of law do you want to get into in the future and which part of the law course is perhaps your favorite to study or you personally find most enjoyable? I want to be a barrister when I'm older!!
(edited 3 months ago)
Original post by Sooha
omgg i also want to be a lawyer in the future.

oh wowww, i want to be barrister ahaha😁 what type of lawyer do you want to be like criminal lawyer, corporate lawyer, attorney, family lawyer etc.
(edited 3 months ago)
Original post by heartz4moushi
what do you mean by that? they allow you to do a joint course of english + law?

yes, if you want to be a barrister you need a qualifying law degree or conversion. UofG have a course that combines both and is about 75% law 25% english lit (but this varies and you can pick more or less english modules). especially if you want to be a barrister this may be a good option.
Original post by nosleepyescoffee
yes, if you want to be a barrister you need a qualifying law degree or conversion. UofG have a course that combines both and is about 75% law 25% english lit (but this varies and you can pick more or less english modules). especially if you want to be a barrister this may be a good option.

wow, i never knew this was possible, such a cool way to incorporate two things i'm passionate about. thank you so much for letting me know though, will be considering this for when i do my uni applications in a few years time!😄
Original post by heartz4moushi
Hi! Thank you so much, you're experiences have most definitely been useful and thank you for taking your time out to reply to me!
Yes I've head that no Law course is easy and requires a lot of brain power and will! What were your assignments and the prep for them like? A lot of independent study I'm guessing. Also, what kind of books do you guys reads or do research from and how did you find it? And, what kind of law job do you want to get into after graduating? Like lawyer, solicitor, paralegal etc.
Thank you.

Hi @heartz4moushi

There is a lot of independent study but you may be able to break that up with group studying with course mates.
Assignments were a mix of law reports, case summaries, rule of law based that were submitted during the year plus extensive written essays which were typically done in the formal exam diet. For weekly seminars there was extensive reading based on textbook, case reports, cases, legislation etc. Research and reading is mostly these sources and your uni will let you know how to access them.
There are lots of different professions you can go into and it is definetly encouraged to get some work experience during your studies - in holidays for instance - so you can see what you might like.

Catherine - University of Strathclyde Student Ambassador
Original post by heartz4moushi
Thank you so much for this reply!
You explained everything so clearly, and answered all the questions I wanted to ask really😅
If you don't mind me asking, what field of law do you want to get into in the future and which part of the law course is perhaps your favorite to study or you personally find most enjoyable? I want to be a barrister when I'm older!!

Hi there

I'm glad to have addressed most of your queries.

For myself, I am interested in becoming a solicitor, though I have not decided what field of law I am interested in yet. Some of my favourite courses have been: criminal law, company law, and succession law. There are many interesting cases that you can learn in criminal law, and it is a very engaging module. I enjoy company law and succession law, as we get to study the content in context of societal developments and any social considerations. Depending on what type of things you are interested, each person will have a different topic that they enjoy. :smile:

It is great to hear that you know what you want to do in the future. I would really recommend doing some mooting at University if you get the chance. For my law school, we offer mooting as a module, and many other mooting opportunities throughout the year. So be sure to check whether you have these opportunities in your University.

Chloe
University of Kent Student Rep
Original post by heartz4moushi
As someone who is aspiring to do law, what is it like for those who are/have done this course at uni? And english lit is also another (though much less likely to choose) option, and the same question stands for this course too.

Hiya

As everyone has already shared their experiences with you, I think these blogs will also help you know about what it's like to study these courses at Durham:

https://studentblog.webspace.durham.ac.uk/whats-it-like-studying-law-2/
https://studentblog.webspace.durham.ac.uk/whats-it-like-studying-english-3/

-Himieka
Original post by heartz4moushi
As someone who is aspiring to do law, what is it like for those who are/have done this course at uni? And english lit is also another (though much less likely to choose) option, and the same question stands for this course too.

Hi there!
As someone who does law, I can give you a good idea of what it is like to study law at uni.
While it may differ from university to university, I feel that a core component of law is how much reading is required. Of course, you may already have an idea of this but it may not be to the level you would have expected.
I feel that law is also a coursework-heavy subject and may not be as exam-based as other subjects. This may be different for other universities but in my experience at Lancaster, I have found that this is the case. This has both its pros and cons, one positive being that you do not have to do as much studying and reading for exams or if you do not as much compared to other degrees. One negative of this is that you may end up being overwhelmed with the amount of deadlines you have during term time. At Lancaster, a lot of courses within law allow some flexibility in the type of assessments students choose and you can end up with a good blend that is not too focused on one style.

I hope this helped. If you have any more questions feel free to ask here. I will also include a link to the Lancaster Ask A Student page so you can have a chat with students studying law and English Lit to get better insight into them.

https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/study/chat/
Best wishes,
Lancaster University Student Ambassador,
Glory.
Original post by University of Kent
Hi there

I'm glad to have addressed most of your queries.

For myself, I am interested in becoming a solicitor, though I have not decided what field of law I am interested in yet. Some of my favourite courses have been: criminal law, company law, and succession law. There are many interesting cases that you can learn in criminal law, and it is a very engaging module. I enjoy company law and succession law, as we get to study the content in context of societal developments and any social considerations. Depending on what type of things you are interested, each person will have a different topic that they enjoy. :smile:

It is great to hear that you know what you want to do in the future. I would really recommend doing some mooting at University if you get the chance. For my law school, we offer mooting as a module, and many other mooting opportunities throughout the year. So be sure to check whether you have these opportunities in your University.

Chloe
University of Kent Student Rep

Yes, I totally agree with you! I feel like every specific sub-field in law has lots of different and unique aspects to it that are interesting, and it's going to be tricky to choose just one area. I heard that corporate and intellectual property jobs are some of the most rewarding but I would definitely say criminal law offers the more interesting side of things as you look at lots of different crimes and cases. I do agree that it just depends of personal preference what a person decides to stick for in the end. Doing law is rewarding no matter what area you go into, as long as you enjoy doing your job and your passionate about it.
If you don't mind me asking, what is mooting? I'm guessing it's something like having 'moots', but I've never heard this term being used in the context of university?
Have a lovely day!
Original post by Durham Students
Hiya

As everyone has already shared their experiences with you, I think these blogs will also help you know about what it's like to study these courses at Durham:

https://studentblog.webspace.durham.ac.uk/whats-it-like-studying-law-2/
https://studentblog.webspace.durham.ac.uk/whats-it-like-studying-english-3/

-Himieka

Thank you !! I will take a look at these😊
Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador
Hi there!
As someone who does law, I can give you a good idea of what it is like to study law at uni.
While it may differ from university to university, I feel that a core component of law is how much reading is required. Of course, you may already have an idea of this but it may not be to the level you would have expected.
I feel that law is also a coursework-heavy subject and may not be as exam-based as other subjects. This may be different for other universities but in my experience at Lancaster, I have found that this is the case. This has both its pros and cons, one positive being that you do not have to do as much studying and reading for exams or if you do not as much compared to other degrees. One negative of this is that you may end up being overwhelmed with the amount of deadlines you have during term time. At Lancaster, a lot of courses within law allow some flexibility in the type of assessments students choose and you can end up with a good blend that is not too focused on one style.

I hope this helped. If you have any more questions feel free to ask here. I will also include a link to the Lancaster Ask A Student page so you can have a chat with students studying law and English Lit to get better insight into them.

https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/study/chat/
Best wishes,
Lancaster University Student Ambassador,
Glory.

I don't think the course being an heavily essay based subject will be much more of problem for me as it is what i prefer to do, than let's say a bunch of knowledge testing questions or maths problems. I'm much more comfortable writing essays, sooo not going to get into the nitty gritty of that. But I will say the AMOUNT of work does seem overwhelming, and it's the only concern that I really have. Maybe when I actually get to the uni stage, things will change and I'll find both of these things hard but who knows😂
Thanks so much for the help, I appreciate it
Hey, I'm currently doing an english literature (with creative writing) degree!
Generally I think it depends what university you go too, but my experience with my course has so far been alright. There's a lot more emphasis on analysing texts in close detail and you go over a lot of stuff (which can be tricky to keep up with) in a short amount of time, and earlier replies are right that there's a lot more independent learning. Assignments are a mix of things; I've had essays, creative writing assignments, key word analyses and even podcasts and video essays, however generally english lit is fully coursework (so if that suits you, go ahead!).
Honestly, it depends the university like for some reason I was forced to take a criminology class despite not doing it? Good luck on whatever you choose to do!
Original post by heartz4moushi
Yes, I totally agree with you! I feel like every specific sub-field in law has lots of different and unique aspects to it that are interesting, and it's going to be tricky to choose just one area. I heard that corporate and intellectual property jobs are some of the most rewarding but I would definitely say criminal law offers the more interesting side of things as you look at lots of different crimes and cases. I do agree that it just depends of personal preference what a person decides to stick for in the end. Doing law is rewarding no matter what area you go into, as long as you enjoy doing your job and your passionate about it.
If you don't mind me asking, what is mooting? I'm guessing it's something like having 'moots', but I've never heard this term being used in the context of university?
Have a lovely day!

Hiya

Yes, there are definitely a lot of sub-fields in law, each are very different. Corporate and commercial related laws are often the more financially rewarding, as it involves working with large companies in contrast to private clients (individuals). Criminal law, or other areas of law such as family, immigration can also be rewarding in terms of being able to assist people in need. So it is really up to you as to what field you are interested in. :biggrin:

A moot in a law context is something like a court trial. :smile: In University, there are often chances for students to participate in moots- i.e. playing the role of the barrister in a mock court situation. Since you mentioned wanting to become a barrister, mooting opportunities can be really useful.

Participating in a moot helps you build your confidence, public speaking skills, argument skills as well as improving your independent research skills. You can find more information about this here:https://www.chambersstudent.co.uk/where-to-start/newsletter/what-is-mooting.

Hope that answers your question. :biggrin:
Chloe
University of Kent Student Rep

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