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    Hi Everyone,

    I've been reading over these forum pages and laughing to myself at the amount of misinformation out there about undergraduate study in Australia. I am a current international student (I'm English), here in Australia so thought I'd offer up an advice post. That said, universities across Australia differ greatly and your first port of call should always be the university website, on the 'international students' page.

    As well as giving some info about my own experience, I've written about Study Options, Undergraduate Degrees in Australia (IMPORTANT!), Costs, Scholarships/ Student Finance, Seeking Further Advice. While this post is very general, hopefully it will act as a launch point for those of you interested in studying overseas.

    Study Options
    If you're thinking of studying in Australia then think very carefully about the commitment needed to complete an entire degree overseas. I have found my four years in Melbourne to be both challenging and rewarding. Do not underestimate the changes you will face in a new culture, even if you are from the UK, and how difficult it can be to be so far from family. That said, there is also a lot of confidence and independence to be gained from studying overseas and the exposure to new cultures is wonderful.

    If you definitely want to study in Australia, but are not sure that three years overseas is for you, then consider going on exchange. Many British universities have exchange programs, allowing you to go to Australia for one semester or a full year. The bonus of exchange, also, is that you only have to pay UK tuition fees! Looking back, I don't think I'd swap my four years here in Melbourne for anything, though I do wish I'd been more aware of my options when I first applied.

    Undergraduate Degrees in Australia
    This is *IMPORTANT* - undergraduate degrees in Australia are NOT the same as UK degrees and this is something that you need to understand fully before embarking on study overseas.

    Australian undergraduates study for a three year bachelors degree. This differs from a UK degree in that it is not an honours degree (i.e a degree that is classed with a 'First', '2:1', '2:2' etc). UK universities (mostly) offer degrees with the letters BA (Hons), for example, whereas degrees in Australia would be BA, only.

    Students wishing to obtain an honours degree in Australia study a fourth 'honours' year at their university. The administrative difference here is this: UK Honours degrees require 360 points of study. Australian Bachelors degrees make up 300 points of study, and honours degrees 400 points.

    This is not to belittle the excellence of Australian universities and their teaching standard. Education, especially tertiary education, in Australia is fantastic and recognised internationally. The first three years of undergraduate study are, however, designed to offer a broader approach to education than most UK courses. Honours study is seen as an extra commitment, involving specialist research and a higher level of academia.

    This difference should not put you off study in Australia. As long as you are aware of the differences then I believe that an Australian education can actually offer a more logical approach to learning. I have loved my undergraduate studies, they have given me the opportunity to explore a wider range of arts subjects than would have been possible on a UK course. I'm coming out of my degree with interests that I would never have developed had I not had the opportunity to build breadth and multi-disciplinary studies into my degree.

    Coming back to the UK with an Australian degree can be slightly more tricky. If, like me, you cannot afford a fourth honours year of study then you may be left trying to explain the ranking of your bachelors degree to employers and universities. Luckily, awareness about the differences in education is increasing and I'm finding that, with some flexibility on my part, there are no options that are closed to me. I am, however, considering enrolling into the 3rd year of a UK degree course in order to gain the 'honours' element of my degree. This is only because I wish to undertake a PhD, something that I could not do without honours.

    Application procedure
    Australian students use a service, similar to UCAS to apply to university. This is not applicable to international students, who apply directly to each university. The plus side of this is that you can apply to as many universities as you like, without needing to rank your choices in order of preference.

    Most universities require a hardcopy or certified copy of your AS/ A-level and GCSE results, along with copies of personal identification etc. There is usually an online application form and some courses require you to write a personal statement or provide references. Many universities charge a non-refundable administration fee, up to $150 for assessing your application but some are free. Again, check the university's website.


    Cost
    A lot of you want to know how much international study costs. As I said, check the university website as fees vary. At the University of Melbourne, for example, an undergraduate degree (BA) in Arts costs around $25,000 per year. Science degrees and commerce degrees cost substantially more. Melbourne is one of the most expensive universities in Australia (because it's currently ranked #1) and other universities charge less. However, I've never come across undergrad fees that were less than $16,000 per year. Also, I personally wouldn't apply to the universities charging the least as they do not tend to be internationally recognised.

    On top of uni fees you need to consider the following costs:
    Visa application: About $550, plus the costs for medicals
    OSHC Cover: Compulsory medical insurance for international students, about $500 - $1000 per year for BASIC cover (no dental, optical etc). Australia do not have an 'NHS' so to speak. Medical treatment, prescriptions etc cost a lot of money and not all of this is claimable on your insurance.
    Travel: consider the costs of flights each year, plus your transport in Australia. Most students use public transport which is not cheap. In Melbourne, international students do not receive concession prices and a weekly transport pass is about $35.
    Accommodation: Universities, in Melbourne/ Victoria at least, do not have halls of residence in the way that UK universities do. Some universities, such as Melbourne, do have colleges which provide student bedrooms, meals and sometimes extra tuition included in the price. However it should be notes that college fees are approx $15,000 - $24,000 per year. Rented accommodation is either in a student share house or single, private property and varies from $130 (rare) - $500+. Bills are not usually included and you will be expected to pay one month's rent up front, plus a deposit equivalent to one month's rent.
    Living: Living in Australia is not cheap, especially as the pound is currently so weak. Food prices continue to shock me and living on a budget as a student is not as easy as in the UK. Obviously living costs vary depending on where you live but as a rule Perth, Sydney and Melbourne are the most expensive areas. There is a misconception that Perth is incredibly cheap but in recent years it has become far more expensive.

    Scholarships/ Student Loans
    Please do not be fooled into thinking that it is easy to receive funding for your time in Australia. There is no student finance/ student loans company for international students in Australia. Additionally, scholarships are extremely competitive and few and far between. The University of Melbourne, for example, has one of the best scholarship programs in Australia. There are over 120 scholarships available to students from the UK. However, these scholarships are based solely on academic merit. As Melbourne Uni is ranked #1 in Australia, you can expect their scholarships to be as competitive as Oxford and Cambridge. If you have exceptionally high A-level results then go for it!

    Additionally scholarships are available via the Australian government for outstanding students. Again, think world's brightest and best. Any other scholarships tend to be for students from disadvantaged or developing countries. In the UK there is a brilliant system which offers access to higher education. As such, English students are not eligible for these awards as they are not perceived to be without education options or at risk.

    Seeking further advice
    As I've said over and over again (sorry!), your first port of call should absolutely be the website of the university that you wish to apply to. I'd also recommend international student agents, such as Study Options or Degrees Ahead, who can help you navigate your options and assist with applications etc. When I was applying to uni in Australia these services were free but they might well now cost something, I'm not sure.

    Another good idea is to look on the individual Australian state websites. These usually have a section about living in the particular state as well as links to information about studying as an international student. Simply Google: 'Living in Victoria/ Western Australia/ New South Wales' etc and look for the government funded website (usually ends in .gov.au)


    It's 1am here (apologies for typos induced by tiredness!) and that's about all I can think of for now. If you have any questions, please ask. All in all I will tell you that my experience as an undergrad in Australia has been amazing. I have met some wonderful people and grown immensely as a person. Despite loving Melbourne, there does come a time when you feel ready to go home and you shouldn't underestimate how strange it can be to be away from your own culture. Being an international student is hard and requires a lot more effort, strength and bravery (and funding!) than you might imagine.

    Another thing worth mentioning - Australia is not all beach and surfboards and offers a lot of cultural and academic variety. It's also a LOT smaller, in terms of population, than the UK. Melbourne is one of the larger cities but feels more like a big town to me. It is very open, liveable, green and spacious. I love Melbourne and would recommend The University of Melbourne to anyone who feels ready to try out international study. I hope this post has been helpful for a few of you.

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    This is ALL excellent advice.

    I am an academic who has studied in both Australia and England. The two countries and their education systems are very different as Natty has explained, and although Australia is an English speaking country, it isnt 'just like Britain but with hot weather' - culture/lifestyle/attitudes/opinions are very different. Do not underestimate how much you would miss your family and friends. Once the initial excitement of 'I'm in Australia!' has worn off, homesickness can be horrible experience. I echo Natty's suggestion of a Year Abroad in Australia as a good alternative - increasing numbers of British Unis are offering Australia as a possible destination.
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    Nominate for a sticky!

    Also, if anyone wants reviews of top Australian unis, written by UK students, go here.
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    (Original post by natty883)
    Hi Everyone,

    I've been reading over these forum pages and laughing to myself at the amount of misinformation out there about undergraduate study in Australia. I am a current international student (I'm English), here in Australia so thought I'd offer up an advice post. That said, universities across Australia differ greatly and your first port of call should always be the university website, on the 'international students' page.

    As well as giving some info about my own experience, I've written about Study Options, Undergraduate Degrees in Australia (IMPORTANT!), Costs, Scholarships/ Student Finance, Seeking Further Advice. While this post is very general, hopefully it will act as a launch point for those of you interested in studying overseas.

    Study Options
    If you're thinking of studying in Australia then think very carefully about the commitment needed to complete an entire degree overseas. I have found my four years in Melbourne to be both challenging and rewarding. Do not underestimate the changes you will face in a new culture, even if you are from the UK, and how difficult it can be to be so far from family. That said, there is also a lot of confidence and independence to be gained from studying overseas and the exposure to new cultures is wonderful.

    If you definitely want to study in Australia, but are not sure that three years overseas is for you, then consider going on exchange. Many British universities have exchange programs, allowing you to go to Australia for one semester or a full year. The bonus of exchange, also, is that you only have to pay UK tuition fees! Looking back, I don't think I'd swap my four years here in Melbourne for anything, though I do wish I'd been more aware of my options when I first applied.

    Undergraduate Degrees in Australia
    This is *IMPORTANT* - undergraduate degrees in Australia are NOT the same as UK degrees and this is something that you need to understand fully before embarking on study overseas.

    Australian undergraduates study for a three year bachelors degree. This differs from a UK degree in that it is not an honours degree (i.e a degree that is classed with a 'First', '2:1', '2:2' etc). UK universities (mostly) offer degrees with the letters BA (Hons), for example, whereas degrees in Australia would be BA, only.

    Students wishing to obtain an honours degree in Australia study a fourth 'honours' year at their university. The administrative difference here is this: UK Honours degrees require 360 points of study. Australian Bachelors degrees make up 300 points of study, and honours degrees 400 points.

    This is not to belittle the excellence of Australian universities and their teaching standard. Education, especially tertiary education, in Australia is fantastic and recognised internationally. The first three years of undergraduate study are, however, designed to offer a broader approach to education than most UK courses. Honours study is seen as an extra commitment, involving specialist research and a higher level of academia.

    This difference should not put you off study in Australia. As long as you are aware of the differences then I believe that an Australian education can actually offer a more logical approach to learning. I have loved my undergraduate studies, they have given me the opportunity to explore a wider range of arts subjects than would have been possible on a UK course. I'm coming out of my degree with interests that I would never have developed had I not had the opportunity to build breadth and multi-disciplinary studies into my degree.

    Coming back to the UK with an Australian degree can be slightly more tricky. If, like me, you cannot afford a fourth honours year of study then you may be left trying to explain the ranking of your bachelors degree to employers and universities. Luckily, awareness about the differences in education is increasing and I'm finding that, with some flexibility on my part, there are no options that are closed to me. I am, however, considering enrolling into the 3rd year of a UK degree course in order to gain the 'honours' element of my degree. This is only because I wish to undertake a PhD, something that I could not do without honours.

    Application procedure
    Australian students use a service, similar to UCAS to apply to university. This is not applicable to international students, who apply directly to each university. The plus side of this is that you can apply to as many universities as you like, without needing to rank your choices in order of preference.

    Most universities require a hardcopy or certified copy of your AS/ A-level and GCSE results, along with copies of personal identification etc. There is usually an online application form and some courses require you to write a personal statement or provide references. Many universities charge a non-refundable administration fee, up to $150 for assessing your application but some are free. Again, check the university's website.


    Cost
    A lot of you want to know how much international study costs. As I said, check the university website as fees vary. At the University of Melbourne, for example, an undergraduate degree (BA) in Arts costs around $25,000 per year. Science degrees and commerce degrees cost substantially more. Melbourne is one of the most expensive universities in Australia (because it's currently ranked #1) and other universities charge less. However, I've never come across undergrad fees that were less than $16,000 per year. Also, I personally wouldn't apply to the universities charging the least as they do not tend to be internationally recognised.

    On top of uni fees you need to consider the following costs:
    Visa application: About $550, plus the costs for medicals
    OSHC Cover: Compulsory medical insurance for international students, about $500 - $1000 per year for BASIC cover (no dental, optical etc). Australia do not have an 'NHS' so to speak. Medical treatment, prescriptions etc cost a lot of money and not all of this is claimable on your insurance.
    Travel: consider the costs of flights each year, plus your transport in Australia. Most students use public transport which is not cheap. In Melbourne, international students do not receive concession prices and a weekly transport pass is about $35.
    Accommodation: Universities, in Melbourne/ Victoria at least, do not have halls of residence in the way that UK universities do. Some universities, such as Melbourne, do have colleges which provide student bedrooms, meals and sometimes extra tuition included in the price. However it should be notes that college fees are approx $15,000 - $24,000 per year. Rented accommodation is either in a student share house or single, private property and varies from $130 (rare) - $500+. Bills are not usually included and you will be expected to pay one month's rent up front, plus a deposit equivalent to one month's rent.
    Living: Living in Australia is not cheap, especially as the pound is currently so weak. Food prices continue to shock me and living on a budget as a student is not as easy as in the UK. Obviously living costs vary depending on where you live but as a rule Perth, Sydney and Melbourne are the most expensive areas. There is a misconception that Perth is incredibly cheap but in recent years it has become far more expensive.

    Scholarships/ Student Loans
    Please do not be fooled into thinking that it is easy to receive funding for your time in Australia. There is no student finance/ student loans company for international students in Australia. Additionally, scholarships are extremely competitive and few and far between. The University of Melbourne, for example, has one of the best scholarship programs in Australia. There are over 120 scholarships available to students from the UK. However, these scholarships are based solely on academic merit. As Melbourne Uni is ranked #1 in Australia, you can expect their scholarships to be as competitive as Oxford and Cambridge. If you have exceptionally high A-level results then go for it!

    Additionally scholarships are available via the Australian government for outstanding students. Again, think world's brightest and best. Any other scholarships tend to be for students from disadvantaged or developing countries. In the UK there is a brilliant system which offers access to higher education. As such, English students are not eligible for these awards as they are not perceived to be without education options or at risk.

    Seeking further advice
    As I've said over and over again (sorry!), your first port of call should absolutely be the website of the university that you wish to apply to. I'd also recommend international student agents, such as Study Options or Degrees Ahead, who can help you navigate your options and assist with applications etc. When I was applying to uni in Australia these services were free but they might well now cost something, I'm not sure.

    Another good idea is to look on the individual Australian state websites. These usually have a section about living in the particular state as well as links to information about studying as an international student. Simply Google: 'Living in Victoria/ Western Australia/ New South Wales' etc and look for the government funded website (usually ends in .gov.au)


    It's 1am here (apologies for typos induced by tiredness!) and that's about all I can think of for now. If you have any questions, please ask. All in all I will tell you that my experience as an undergrad in Australia has been amazing. I have met some wonderful people and grown immensely as a person. Despite loving Melbourne, there does come a time when you feel ready to go home and you shouldn't underestimate how strange it can be to be away from your own culture. Being an international student is hard and requires a lot more effort, strength and bravery (and funding!) than you might imagine.

    Another thing worth mentioning - Australia is not all beach and surfboards and offers a lot of cultural and academic variety. It's also a LOT smaller, in terms of population, than the UK. Melbourne is one of the larger cities but feels more like a big town to me. It is very open, liveable, green and spacious. I love Melbourne and would recommend The University of Melbourne to anyone who feels ready to try out international study. I hope this post has been helpful for a few of you.

    Hi! Good information above! I have two questions:

    1) If one has to choose between Queen Mary and University of Sydney or Monash for law, what is your advice?

    2) How do you compare the job opportunities for international students graduating with a local degree in UK versus a local degree in Australia?

    Thanks!
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    Excellent and a really good post, having ex-pat family in Melbourne I found this very interesting and informative and indeed enlightening.
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    Thank you OP for the info, very helpful.
    I hold conditionals from ANU and Monash, waiting for my A level results to apply for the international scholarships at both institutions. And that's gonna take a while so meanwhile...
    Any prospective/current ANU/Monash/Melbourne applicants here?
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    This puts a lot in perspective for me,

    I am thinking of doing study exchange with my university and was wondering if you have any idea what universities are good in Australia for Graphic Design/Illustration students. Ive been looking online so have a couple in mind but to hear from some one actually out there would be a big help! Also what is it like to get part time work out there to help with the living costs?
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    (Original post by Seddz2)
    This puts a lot in perspective for me,

    I am thinking of doing study exchange with my university and was wondering if you have any idea what universities are good in Australia for Graphic Design/Illustration students. Ive been looking online so have a couple in mind but to hear from some one actually out there would be a big help! Also what is it like to get part time work out there to help with the living costs?
    RMIT in Melbourne. Good technical University, and Melbourne is the best city in Australia to live in.

    BUT. You will not have a free choice which Uni you go to. It will depend on which Unis your home Uni has an exchange agreement with. Since the academic year is different in Australia (March to Dec), fitting in a full year is tricky and this often means Uk Unis have a link with, at best, only one Australian Uni, and often an exchange will be for a couple of terms not a full year. So dont assume its up to you to pick where you want to go! Also, if the time abroad isnt an intrinsic part of the degree (ie. it is 'with Year Abroad') you will probably have to pay for the exchange yourself - overseas fees, air-fares, and living costs - as its not within the European Erasmus zone.

    Part-time work .... you are only allowed to work for very limited hours and only during term-time ( http://www.immi.gov.au/students/stud...hile_studying/). There are the same low-skilled work ops in Australia as here - retail, McDonalds etc. Bar-work requires all sorts of certification ('Responsible sale of alcohol') which you have to organise/pay for yourself.

    Honestly, if you will have to pay for it all, it would be easier for you to defer your Uni place here for a year and get a Working Holiday visa, or to do this once you have graduated. (http://www.immi.gov.au/visas/pages/417.aspx).
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    RMIT in Melbourne. Good technical University, and Melbourne is the best city in Australia to live in.

    BUT. You will not have a free choice which Uni you go to. It will depend on which Unis your home Uni has an exchange agreement with. Since the academic year is different in Australia (March to Dec), fitting in a full year is tricky and this often means Uk Unis have a link with, at best, only one Australian Uni, and often an exchange will be for a couple of terms not a full year. So dont assume its up to you to pick where you want to go! Also, if the time abroad isnt an intrinsic part of the degree (ie. it is 'with Year Abroad') you will probably have to pay for the exchange yourself - overseas fees, air-fares, and living costs - as its not within the European Erasmus zone.

    Part-time work .... you are only allowed to work for very limited hours and only during term-time ( http://www.immi.gov.au/students/stud...hile_studying/). There are the same low-skilled work ops in Australia as here - retail, McDonalds etc. Bar-work requires all sorts of certification ('Responsible sale of alcohol') which you have to organise/pay for yourself.

    Honestly, if you will have to pay for it all, it would be easier for you to defer your Uni place here for a year and get a Working Holiday visa, or to do this once you have graduated. (http://www.immi.gov.au/visas/pages/417.aspx).
    Thanks for the help!

    I am only doing one semester in Australia, so around 4-6 months! RMIT has been mentioned to me a few times.

    My university in England has said that I can choose the uni then they sort the rest out for me! and they have worked with RMIT in the past and said they are good for international student villages so accommodation isn't to hard to sort out!

    Do you have any idea how much it would cost to live and get by per month?

    Just trying to get as much knowledge as i can before committing to anything major!

    Thanks
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    Living expenses - here is a guide from Monash Uni (Melbourne) : http://www.monash.edu/study/internat...cost-of-living and from Victoria Uni (Melbourne) : http://www.vu.edu.au/study-with-us/i...cost-of-living
    Remembers its in Australian dollars.
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    (Original post by natty883)
    Hi Everyone,

    I've been reading over these forum pages and laughing to myself at the amount of misinformation out there about undergraduate study in Australia. I am a current international student (I'm English), here in Australia so thought I'd offer up an advice post. That said, universities across Australia differ greatly and your first port of call should always be the university website, on the 'international students' page.

    As well as giving some info about my own experience, I've written about Study Options, Undergraduate Degrees in Australia (IMPORTANT!), Costs, Scholarships/ Student Finance, Seeking Further Advice. While this post is very general, hopefully it will act as a launch point for those of you interested in studying overseas.

    Study Options
    If you're thinking of studying in Australia then think very carefully about the commitment needed to complete an entire degree overseas. I have found my four years in Melbourne to be both challenging and rewarding. Do not underestimate the changes you will face in a new culture, even if you are from the UK, and how difficult it can be to be so far from family. That said, there is also a lot of confidence and independence to be gained from studying overseas and the exposure to new cultures is wonderful.

    If you definitely want to study in Australia, but are not sure that three years overseas is for you, then consider going on exchange. Many British universities have exchange programs, allowing you to go to Australia for one semester or a full year. The bonus of exchange, also, is that you only have to pay UK tuition fees! Looking back, I don't think I'd swap my four years here in Melbourne for anything, though I do wish I'd been more aware of my options when I first applied.

    Undergraduate Degrees in Australia
    This is *IMPORTANT* - undergraduate degrees in Australia are NOT the same as UK degrees and this is something that you need to understand fully before embarking on study overseas.

    Australian undergraduates study for a three year bachelors degree. This differs from a UK degree in that it is not an honours degree (i.e a degree that is classed with a 'First', '2:1', '2:2' etc). UK universities (mostly) offer degrees with the letters BA (Hons), for example, whereas degrees in Australia would be BA, only.

    Students wishing to obtain an honours degree in Australia study a fourth 'honours' year at their university. The administrative difference here is this: UK Honours degrees require 360 points of study. Australian Bachelors degrees make up 300 points of study, and honours degrees 400 points.

    This is not to belittle the excellence of Australian universities and their teaching standard. Education, especially tertiary education, in Australia is fantastic and recognised internationally. The first three years of undergraduate study are, however, designed to offer a broader approach to education than most UK courses. Honours study is seen as an extra commitment, involving specialist research and a higher level of academia.

    This difference should not put you off study in Australia. As long as you are aware of the differences then I believe that an Australian education can actually offer a more logical approach to learning. I have loved my undergraduate studies, they have given me the opportunity to explore a wider range of arts subjects than would have been possible on a UK course. I'm coming out of my degree with interests that I would never have developed had I not had the opportunity to build breadth and multi-disciplinary studies into my degree.

    Coming back to the UK with an Australian degree can be slightly more tricky. If, like me, you cannot afford a fourth honours year of study then you may be left trying to explain the ranking of your bachelors degree to employers and universities. Luckily, awareness about the differences in education is increasing and I'm finding that, with some flexibility on my part, there are no options that are closed to me. I am, however, considering enrolling into the 3rd year of a UK degree course in order to gain the 'honours' element of my degree. This is only because I wish to undertake a PhD, something that I could not do without honours.

    Application procedure
    Australian students use a service, similar to UCAS to apply to university. This is not applicable to international students, who apply directly to each university. The plus side of this is that you can apply to as many universities as you like, without needing to rank your choices in order of preference.

    Most universities require a hardcopy or certified copy of your AS/ A-level and GCSE results, along with copies of personal identification etc. There is usually an online application form and some courses require you to write a personal statement or provide references. Many universities charge a non-refundable administration fee, up to $150 for assessing your application but some are free. Again, check the university's website.


    Cost
    A lot of you want to know how much international study costs. As I said, check the university website as fees vary. At the University of Melbourne, for example, an undergraduate degree (BA) in Arts costs around $25,000 per year. Science degrees and commerce degrees cost substantially more. Melbourne is one of the most expensive universities in Australia (because it's currently ranked #1) and other universities charge less. However, I've never come across undergrad fees that were less than $16,000 per year. Also, I personally wouldn't apply to the universities charging the least as they do not tend to be internationally recognised.

    On top of uni fees you need to consider the following costs:
    Visa application: About $550, plus the costs for medicals
    OSHC Cover: Compulsory medical insurance for international students, about $500 - $1000 per year for BASIC cover (no dental, optical etc). Australia do not have an 'NHS' so to speak. Medical treatment, prescriptions etc cost a lot of money and not all of this is claimable on your insurance.
    Travel: consider the costs of flights each year, plus your transport in Australia. Most students use public transport which is not cheap. In Melbourne, international students do not receive concession prices and a weekly transport pass is about $35.
    Accommodation: Universities, in Melbourne/ Victoria at least, do not have halls of residence in the way that UK universities do. Some universities, such as Melbourne, do have colleges which provide student bedrooms, meals and sometimes extra tuition included in the price. However it should be notes that college fees are approx $15,000 - $24,000 per year. Rented accommodation is either in a student share house or single, private property and varies from $130 (rare) - $500+. Bills are not usually included and you will be expected to pay one month's rent up front, plus a deposit equivalent to one month's rent.
    Living: Living in Australia is not cheap, especially as the pound is currently so weak. Food prices continue to shock me and living on a budget as a student is not as easy as in the UK. Obviously living costs vary depending on where you live but as a rule Perth, Sydney and Melbourne are the most expensive areas. There is a misconception that Perth is incredibly cheap but in recent years it has become far more expensive.

    Scholarships/ Student Loans
    Please do not be fooled into thinking that it is easy to receive funding for your time in Australia. There is no student finance/ student loans company for international students in Australia. Additionally, scholarships are extremely competitive and few and far between. The University of Melbourne, for example, has one of the best scholarship programs in Australia. There are over 120 scholarships available to students from the UK. However, these scholarships are based solely on academic merit. As Melbourne Uni is ranked #1 in Australia, you can expect their scholarships to be as competitive as Oxford and Cambridge. If you have exceptionally high A-level results then go for it!

    Additionally scholarships are available via the Australian government for outstanding students. Again, think world's brightest and best. Any other scholarships tend to be for students from disadvantaged or developing countries. In the UK there is a brilliant system which offers access to higher education. As such, English students are not eligible for these awards as they are not perceived to be without education options or at risk.

    Seeking further advice
    As I've said over and over again (sorry!), your first port of call should absolutely be the website of the university that you wish to apply to. I'd also recommend international student agents, such as Study Options or Degrees Ahead, who can help you navigate your options and assist with applications etc. When I was applying to uni in Australia these services were free but they might well now cost something, I'm not sure.

    Another good idea is to look on the individual Australian state websites. These usually have a section about living in the particular state as well as links to information about studying as an international student. Simply Google: 'Living in Victoria/ Western Australia/ New South Wales' etc and look for the government funded website (usually ends in .gov.au)


    It's 1am here (apologies for typos induced by tiredness!) and that's about all I can think of for now. If you have any questions, please ask. All in all I will tell you that my experience as an undergrad in Australia has been amazing. I have met some wonderful people and grown immensely as a person. Despite loving Melbourne, there does come a time when you feel ready to go home and you shouldn't underestimate how strange it can be to be away from your own culture. Being an international student is hard and requires a lot more effort, strength and bravery (and funding!) than you might imagine.

    Another thing worth mentioning - Australia is not all beach and surfboards and offers a lot of cultural and academic variety. It's also a LOT smaller, in terms of population, than the UK. Melbourne is one of the larger cities but feels more like a big town to me. It is very open, liveable, green and spacious. I love Melbourne and would recommend The University of Melbourne to anyone who feels ready to try out international study. I hope this post has been helpful for a few of you.

    Hi Natty883,

    Just wanted to let you know we love this thread! This is an incredibly accurate and useful summary for prospective international students considering study in Melbourne, Australia.

    We are glad you loved your time at UniMelb

    Cheers,
    Sam
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    (Original post by University of Melbourne, Australia)
    Hi Natty883,

    Just wanted to let you know we love this thread! This is an incredibly accurate and useful summary for prospective international students considering study in Melbourne, Australia.

    We are glad you loved your time at UniMelb

    Cheers,
    Sam
    Hi, I have a question about study options at the University of Melbourne. On the website it says that you can get into medical school with either a Bachelor of Science or a Bachelor of Biomedicine as long as you have the three prerequisites. However, I don't exactly understand why the same courses would have different entry requirements? Is one degree better than the other for going into medicine, even though you're doing the same subjects?

    Also, upon graduating, I might pursue graduate studies in America. How do I sort out the timing issues since Australian unis and American unis start and end at different times? Thank you!
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    (Original post by sj97)
    Hi, I have a question about study options at the University of Melbourne. On the website it says that you can get into medical school with either a Bachelor of Science or a Bachelor of Biomedicine as long as you have the three prerequisites. However, I don't exactly understand why the same courses would have different entry requirements? Is one degree better than the other for going into medicine, even though you're doing the same subjects?

    Also, upon graduating, I might pursue graduate studies in America. How do I sort out the timing issues since Australian unis and American unis start and end at different times? Thank you!
    You will have to ask Melbourne about the different degrees issues or do some more research into how medical training in Australia is structured. Start here : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical...n_in_Australia and then https://www.surgeons.org/media/29222...cation_anz.pdf

    What do you mean 'sort out timing issues'? The academic year in Australian Universities runs March to December. You cant 'sort it out' - that is the way it is.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    You will have to ask Melbourne about the different degrees issues or do some more research into how medical training in Australia is structured. Start here : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical...n_in_Australia and then https://www.surgeons.org/media/29222...cation_anz.pdf

    What do you mean 'sort out timing issues'? The academic year in Australian Universities runs March to December. You cant 'sort it out' - that is the way it is.
    What I meant was that since American universities start in September, there would obviously be some difficulty as I wouldn't have finished my course by that time!
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    Then, obviously, you'd just have to wait for the following year wouldn't you.

    PS. Have you thought how you are going to fund all this?
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    Hi!

    I'm looking at applying for Queensland university and I have a few questions.

    1) How hard is it for an international student to be accepted into an Australian university?

    2) Do Australian universities prefer any qualifications or extra curricular over another? E.g DofE, work experience, the extended qualification.

    3) I've looked the university's website and it mentions English requirements equivalent to their year 12 English, which would be our year 13 English. Do you think I have to take a level English since I live in England and speak it?

    4) How important to them are GCSEs? I've just written mine and I'm feeling very very happy with all of them! I'm hoping for 7A*s and 3As! Fingers crossed...

    5) (last question!) Can you apply for a postgrad in England with an honours degree from Australia?

    Thanks for your help!!!!! Sorry for the overload of questions 😕
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    (Original post by hatcs001)

    ...
    1) No harder than any other International applicant providing you have the right qualifications/predictions. You do have the major advantage that you are English speaking. Entry requirements, in terms of A level grades, for most Australian Unis are lower than parallel Unis here.
    2) They will want to know why you want to study in *Australia* rather than Britain, why that particular Uni, and can you pay the high overseas fee rate and support yourself. You can mention DoE but the other stuff will be more important.
    3) As a native speaker you wont need to meet any IELTS requirement.
    4) Australia does not have formal 16+ exams like GCSEs so whilst good UK GCSEs are useful they wont be a deal breaker as the Unis will be far more interested in your A levels.
    5) See info in opening post about 'honours'. An ordinary degree is not enough for UK postgrad - you will need to do the extra Honours year.

    * Just remember that you will have to pay overseas fees/maintenance yourself. Your chances of a scholarship are effectively zero as funding will go to those from countries with no comparable Universities.
    * A cheaper way of doing this is to do a UK degree with a year abroad in Australia. Many, many UK Unis now do this.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    ... .
    Thank you! That's just what I needed to hear

    One last question, when is the approximate day/time that you have to accept an offer by? Since I will have to apply by November of the previous year, I'll have my a level results already so I won't have to wait for anything. But when do uni's send a provisional offer?

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by hatcs001)
    When is the approximate day/time that you have to accept an offer by? Since I will have to apply by November of the previous year, I'll have my a level results already so I won't have to wait for anything. But when do uni's send a provisional offer?
    Suggest you check dates with each Uni that you intend applying to.

    If you already have your results they will be able to give you a definite offer (not conditional or 'provisional') but be aware that you will have to pay your overseas fees upfront in order to get clearance from the Uni in order to apply for your student visa.
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    (Original post by sj97)
    Hi, I have a question about study options at the University of Melbourne. On the website it says that you can get into medical school with either a Bachelor of Science or a Bachelor of Biomedicine as long as you have the three prerequisites. However, I don't exactly understand why the same courses would have different entry requirements? Is one degree better than the other for going into medicine, even though you're doing the same subjects?

    Also, upon graduating, I might pursue graduate studies in America. How do I sort out the timing issues since Australian unis and American unis start and end at different times? Thank you!
    Hi sj97,

    Thanks the questions!

    If you are interested in pursuing the Doctor of Medicine (MD) at the Melbourne Medical School, you can do so by pursuing the Bachelor of Science (BSc) or Bachelor of Biomedicine (BBioMed) at our University, or by completing a degree at another university which satisfies the entry requirements of the MD (please note a competitive entry process applies between your undergraduate degree and the MD).

    The BSci and BBiomed are different degrees/courses and offer applicants different pathways/qualifications, depending on a students interests and career aspirations. The reason why they are listed as entry pathways to the MD is because they both offer students the prerequisite subjects required to make them eligible to apply to the MD. Students in both the BSc and BBiomed can study the prerequisite subjects (of which there are currently 3) but also have access to subjects only available to students in their degree.

    You can view the exact subjects that each student is able to pick below, as well as a summary of the differences between the degrees:
    BBioMed: https://handbook.unimelb.edu.au/view/2015/B-BMED
    BSc: https://handbook.unimelb.edu.au/view/2015/B-SCI

    Neither degree is better than the other, but in order to determine which is best for you, you need to consider your personal interests, discipline strengths and future career aspirations as well as consider what your A Levels results may be. Please note, you can list 2 degree preferences when applying to the University.

    In order to navigate the different academic year structures, you may want to consider applying to begin in Semester 2 (July). This would mean you would complete your undergraduate degree in June and (if successful) could begin a postgraduate course in America in September, leaving only a few months in between. Please note that Semester 2 entry is not available in the BBioMed.

    Hope that helps!
 
 
 
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