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'Can't be asked' or 'Cant be arsed?' Watch

  • View Poll Results: Whats does 'cba' stand for?
    'Cant be asked'
    23.86%
    'Cant be arsed'
    76.14%

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    (Original post by Ua3142)
    yh, im tryna finish my porridge and go to sleep. Hopefully by tommorow the thread should reach 100 posts!!
    rofl
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    It has always been the latter; the former is used by god botherers who don't want to swear and children who either overhear said god botherers or mishear someone saying the correct phrase.
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    (Original post by Kiytt)
    How doesn't it make sense? It's essentially condensing "I can't fulfill your request"/"I can't do what you ask".

    And yes, the former being an actual verb makes it far more likely to be the original derivative of the phrase, since it's extremely unlikely that the term "arsed" was invented for use within that one saying (as it's not present in any other that I can think of).
    Erm.. 'I can't do what you asked' is different to 'I cannot be asked' - the latter is explicitly saying you can't even ask the request in the first place. Which, I don't know about you, makes no sense once the request has been given.

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    Can't be asked.

    Because I like it
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    (Original post by AthiaKarim)
    Can't be asked.

    Because I like it
    I like a cheeky 4:30 am Taylor Swift marathon, doesn't make it right


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    I'm pretty sure most kids in my high school actually said "I can't be arksed", pronounced "ark-sd". Like the k would come before the s when saying "asked".

    I agree with others though, saying I can't be asked makes no sense. You can be asked, you probably just were, so shut up. :facepalm:
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Erm.. 'I can't do what you asked' is different to 'I cannot be asked' - the latter is explicitly saying you can't even ask the request in the first place. Which, I don't know about you, makes no sense once the request has been given.

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    "Can you do the dishes?" -> "I can't be asked to do the dishes". Obviously it is not literal in its meaning as they were just asked, but rather "I can't be asked and expected to do this".

    It's a colloquial phrase, so its meaning is not going to be literal—but it still utilises the verb "ask" in a context that it makes sense. "Arsed", on the other hand, makes no sense whatsoever.
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    (Original post by Kiytt)
    "Can you do the dishes?" -> "I can't be asked to do the dishes". Obviously it is not literal in its meaning as they were just asked, but rather "I can't be asked and expected to do this".

    It's a colloquial phrase, so its meaning is not going to be literal—but it still utilises the verb "ask" in a context that it makes sense. "Arsed", on the other hand, makes no sense whatsoever.
    Arsed is common colloquial vernacular. Asked in this context is not, and should not be used in the context we're speaking of.
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    "I can't be asked" would go on my list of fundamentally wrong phrases that someone has misheard, right next to " I could care less" and "I axed them".
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    (Original post by HFBS)
    "I can't be asked" would go on my list of fundamentally wrong phrases that someone has misheard, right next to " I could care less" and "I axed them".
    This ^

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Arsed is common colloquial vernacular. Asked in this context is not, and should not be used in the context we're speaking of.
    I still maintain that "I can't be arsed" simply serves as a more profane variant of the former. "Arsed" mimics the pronunciation of "asked", hence why it is used. "I can't be f*cked" is another, less imitative variant.
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    Who the heck is voting can't be asked??? :lolwut:
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    (Original post by HFBS)
    "I can't be asked" would go on my list of fundamentally wrong phrases that someone has misheard, right next to " I could care less" and "I axed them".
    I axed him right down the middle innit
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    People who say the former are halfwits.

    /thread.
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    (Original post by Kiytt)
    I still maintain that "I can't be arsed" simply serves as a more profane variant of the former. "Arsed" mimics the pronunciation of "asked", hence why it is used. "I can't be f*cked" is another, less imitative variant.
    :rofl: Sorry, I just can't believe people are actually voting for "can't be asked" :rofl:

    For what it's worth, "can't be arsed" is in the OED (and was cited as far back as 1968) and "can't be asked" is not.
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    Damn you guys are brutal
 
 
 
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