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She's 12 and she's calling me daddy, what do I do? Watch

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    (Original post by Treblebee)
    Well, tbh I always used to wonder about this too, bc my siblings and I address our parents as Mummy and Daddy (oldest is 17), and nobody else seems to do it... but one time, I heard a PhD student referring to his "daddy", so I figured that it's probably just that with some people, the title sticks. I just can't imagine calling my father "Dad" to his face XP
    I called my father "dad" when I was about 11 and he didn't care
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    (Original post by currysawcc)
    Interesting title!

    If it's something that's bothering you, maybe talk to her about it and see how she feels about calling you dad instead - it may just be force of habit. It's a name, it may just stick! And if it isn't hurting you then it's certainly nothing to worry about. I have eighteen year old friends still calling their parents mummy and daddy, it's just a habit and what they've grown up with!
    Do you think there is any age when this should stop though?
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    My sister is 27 and still says 'mummy'
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    My 19 year old friend still calls her father "daddy".
    Did he buy her a pony to cheer her up after crashing her 2016 Range Rover?
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    (Original post by Darren A)
    My 12 year old daughter is turning 13 soon and she's still calling me daddy. I just want advice from anyone here who is a parent and has children of this age calling them this. It doesn't bother me too much but I am curious as to what age they stop doing that and say mum or dad for example. Thanks!
    Don't worry mate.

    It's only awkward when she has a bf & youre having a lovely meal at the table and she says 'daddy can you pass the salt' and both you and her boyfriend reach for it...
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    (Original post by currysawcc)
    Interesting title!

    If it's something that's bothering you, maybe talk to her about it and see how she feels about calling you dad instead - it may just be force of habit. It's a name, it may just stick! And if it isn't hurting you then it's certainly nothing to worry about. I have eighteen year old friends still calling their parents mummy and daddy, it's just a habit and what they've grown up with!
    That flew right over your head haha.
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    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    My sister is 27 and still says 'mummy'
    What does she call your dad though?
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    I've heard far older girls refer to parents as mummy/daddy
    I referred to my Mum, as mum and got laughed at once. I feel happy in the knowledge that Prince Charles still calls the Queen "mummy" :lol:
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    (Original post by Darren A)
    What does she call your dad though?
    still dad i think
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    #1

    Someone my age nearly 18 still calls his mum mummy. I think it is not to do with age really, it is more of an endearing way to address you
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Don't worry mate.

    It's only awkward when she has a bf & youre having a lovely meal at the table and she says 'daddy can you pass the salt' and both you and her boyfriend reach for it...
    this is worrying
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    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    still dad i think
    there you go then!

    Daddy is worse
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    Well played.

    I still do this with my parents and I'm 19
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    (Original post by Darren A)
    My 12 year old daughter is turning 13 soon and she's still calling me daddy. I just want advice from anyone here who is a parent and has children of this age calling them this. It doesn't bother me too much but I am curious as to what age they stop doing that and say mum or dad for example. Thanks!
    Trolling is an art form and you my good sir have a BA in it 1st class
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    #2

    In a daddy-wanna-spank-me kinda way?
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    A lot of posh people still call their parents 'mummy' and 'daddy'

    (Original post by Darren A)
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    (Original post by Darren A)
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    (Original post by Darren A)
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    How much more ****ing advice do you need man?
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    whenever i hear a person calling their parents mummy and daddy and it isn't a little kid, it's always a female ...and usually they sound posh/upper class/upper middle class
 
 
 
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