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Not continuing with education after 16? watch

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    Hey,

    I'm currently in year 11 and as such am thinking about what I should aim to be doing once I've left school. I understand that you are required to stay in some form of education until your 18th birthday. However, I'm currently employed as a programmer and I do this work alongside school. I've never been a huge fan of the education system since it's not been particularly great at educating me in things I actually use on a daily basis as a programmer. Instead, I've had to teach these skills to myself over a number of years.

    Anyway, my employer is unable to offer me an apprenticeship and I am very much so against the thought of going to college. I'm curious as to whether there would be any consequences if I chose not to attend college or proceed with any form of education? Instead, my employment would just become full-time and I'd continue on with my dream job. I understand the importance of qualifications, but I already have an immense amount of experience in this sector.

    I'm sure many people will view this as a bad choice and state that I'll probably struggle with employment and earning higher wages. But, that is not exactly what I am asking, I just want to ensure that there will not be negative consequences for my parents in regards to fines and so on. Additionally, I would have just turned 17 on the day I would be expected to start my college course and so I would only be a year off from this law.

    Thanks for reading, I'd appreciate any input on this!
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    (Original post by NotMyChicken)
    Hey,

    I'm currently in year 11 and as such am thinking about what I should aim to be doing once I've left school. I understand that you are required to stay in some form of education until your 18th birthday. However, I'm currently employed as a programmer and I do this work alongside school. I've never been a huge fan of the education system since it's not been particularly great at educating me in things I actually use on a daily basis as a programmer. Instead, I've had to teach these skills to myself over a number of years.

    Anyway, my employer is unable to offer me an apprenticeship and I am very much so against the thought of going to college. I'm curious as to whether there would be any consequences if I chose not to attend college or proceed with any form of education? Instead, my employment would just become full-time and I'd continue on with my dream job. I understand the importance of qualifications, but I already have an immense amount of experience in this sector.

    I'm sure many people will view this as a bad choice and state that I'll probably struggle with employment and earning higher wages. But, that is not exactly what I am asking, I just want to ensure that there will not be negative consequences for my parents in regards to fines and so on. Additionally, I would have just turned 17 on the day I would be expected to start my college course and so I would only be a year off from this law.

    Thanks for reading, I'd appreciate any input on this!
    Obviously you know what you are required to do. From the stuff ive read then it seems they arent that interested in enforcing and are unlikely to take any action. It is your risk though. You could ofc try and protect yourself by taking some professional qualifications, but your life.
 
 
 
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