How to revise English Literature?

Watch this thread
I'mnotginger
Badges: 13
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
#1
I have no idea how to revise English Lit other than knowing context facts and where a certain quote is from. Please help I need to get a grade 7
0
reply
sppedcup
Badges: 15
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 4 months ago
#2
recommend cgp books
they have really fun ways to learn quotes and have the themes organised neatly
good buy imo
0
reply
Hyperbolit
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 4 months ago
#3
(Original post by I'mnotginger)
I have no idea how to revise English Lit other than knowing context facts and where a certain quote is from. Please help I need to get a grade 7
Hi there, I run a YouTube channel where I post weekly English Lit study videos - recently did a collaboration with Mr Salles (one of the biggest GCSE lang and lit YouTubers) on 'How to revise for English Lit'. See if our tips help you?

How to revise for English Literature - Part I
How to revise for English Literature - Part II
0
reply
I'mnotginger
Badges: 13
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
#4
(Original post by Hyperbolit)
Hi there, I run a YouTube channel where I post weekly English Lit study videos - recently did a collaboration with Mr Salles (one of the biggest GCSE lang and lit YouTubers) on 'How to revise for English Lit'. See if our tips help you?

How to revise for English Literature - Part I
How to revise for English Literature - Part II
Ty so much! You and Mr Salles are doing great things
1
reply
I'mnotginger
Badges: 13
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
#5
(Original post by sppedcup)
recommend cgp books
they have really fun ways to learn quotes and have the themes organised neatly
good buy imo
Oooo ty very much for the recommendation!
1
reply
username5050312
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report 4 months ago
#6
For english literature, memorise some quotes from the set text and understand how to apply them. Gather some of the larger themes, and see how they can be compared and contrasted. Learn to write essays efficiently.
0
reply
harlz_chalamet
Badges: 18
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#7
Report 4 months ago
#7
Mr Salles is my English God
0
reply
Paige2
Badges: 5
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#8
Report 4 months ago
#8
(Original post by I'mnotginger)
I have no idea how to revise English Lit other than knowing context facts and where a certain quote is from. Please help I need to get a grade 7
Quotes and themes
0
reply
ArcticChimera
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#9
Report 4 months ago
#9
Hi! I am currently doing an English Lit degree, I got A* across both GCSE and A Level and I am here to tell you that mind maps are your best friend.

For each text, make mind maps on themes (using lots of nice coloured pens makes the whole experience so much more fun!) Then, I would find a few quotes for each theme which you can begin practising (but memorise closer to the time). Remember, don't panic in exams if you forget an entire quote, in fact, it is better if you "blend" the quotes in a sentence, just dropping in key phrases from the quote in quotation marks so that it fits nicely into the sentence/argument you're making, rather than writing the whole thing.

When writing essays at GCSE (and A Level, with a few extra steps), you want to make your argument clear in the intro, then roughly do 2 paragraphs in favour of your argument and one against. But in the argument against paragraph, make sure that at the end of the paragraph you counter it, and state why it is a weak argument against your own, and why your argument ultimately prevails.

For me, essay writing came naturally, but the memorising was the most difficult. If you struggle with essay writing, a quicker way to revise is to make essay plans for various questions (looking at past papers might help). Write 1 sentence stating your argument then bullet point what you'd put in each paragraph, and finally, how you'd wrap it all up in the argument. This will help with quotes as well, as you'll start trying to integrate which quotes would go in which paragraph in the plan, and when it comes to the real thing, you will be able to knock a plan together in about 3 minutes and be much more confident writing the essay.

I will say at GCSE and A Level, I revised as I went along and when it came to exam season, pretty much just read my notes the night before. It was my easiest subject. Don't overthink how to revise it, as long as you know a basic essay structure for each type of question (evaluation, comparison etc.) and some general quotes and context for each text (they're not expecting you to know everything inside out, just key snappy bits of info) you will be completely fine
0
reply
harlz_chalamet
Badges: 18
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#10
Report 3 months ago
#10
(Original post by ArcticChimera)
Hi! I am currently doing an English Lit degree, I got A* across both GCSE and A Level and I am here to tell you that mind maps are your best friend.

For each text, make mind maps on themes (using lots of nice coloured pens makes the whole experience so much more fun!) Then, I would find a few quotes for each theme which you can begin practising (but memorise closer to the time). Remember, don't panic in exams if you forget an entire quote, in fact, it is better if you "blend" the quotes in a sentence, just dropping in key phrases from the quote in quotation marks so that it fits nicely into the sentence/argument you're making, rather than writing the whole thing.

When writing essays at GCSE (and A Level, with a few extra steps), you want to make your argument clear in the intro, then roughly do 2 paragraphs in favour of your argument and one against. But in the argument against paragraph, make sure that at the end of the paragraph you counter it, and state why it is a weak argument against your own, and why your argument ultimately prevails.

For me, essay writing came naturally, but the memorising was the most difficult. If you struggle with essay writing, a quicker way to revise is to make essay plans for various questions (looking at past papers might help). Write 1 sentence stating your argument then bullet point what you'd put in each paragraph, and finally, how you'd wrap it all up in the argument. This will help with quotes as well, as you'll start trying to integrate which quotes would go in which paragraph in the plan, and when it comes to the real thing, you will be able to knock a plan together in about 3 minutes and be much more confident writing the essay.

I will say at GCSE and A Level, I revised as I went along and when it came to exam season, pretty much just read my notes the night before. It was my easiest subject. Don't overthink how to revise it, as long as you know a basic essay structure for each type of question (evaluation, comparison etc.) and some general quotes and context for each text (they're not expecting you to know everything inside out, just key snappy bits of info) you will be completely fine
do you know where to find the context from? i find that the hardest bit, especially as I don't take History as a GCSE subject and all the books I have to learn - Macbeth, A Christmas carol and an inspector calls - require quite a bit of context?
I might start making mind maps, quite a few people have mentioned doing that now.
thankyou so much!
0
reply
ArcticChimera
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#11
Report 3 months ago
#11
(Original post by harlz_chalamet)
do you know where to find the context from? i find that the hardest bit, especially as I don't take History as a GCSE subject and all the books I have to learn - Macbeth, A Christmas carol and an inspector calls - require quite a bit of context?
I might start making mind maps, quite a few people have mentioned doing that now.
thankyou so much!
As much as I hate to say it; a lot of my context came from the internet!
Example:
In the Shakespearean era, Witches were associated with the dark and death. They were said by many Christian countries to be agents of Satan and performing evil acts at night.

When Shakespeare wrote Macbeth, witchcraft and supernatural happenings were of high interest. King James I was highly engaged with the idea of witchcraft and even wrote a book about the topic. He used them for his play, and many of his audience would have believed in them as evil servants, trapping the power of men and women.
- http://katenewcombemacbeth.weebly.com/context.html

https://pmt.physicsandmathstutor.com...ure%20GCSE.pdf

This ^ also seems like a very handy one for Macbeth context! You only need to drop it in here and there, they're not looking for a history essay don't worry

I haven't studied the other 2; I did do Macbeth for GCSE though. Context doesn't just have to be historical dates etc. it could also be about how audiences would receive the play at the time, how women were viewed etc. At GCSE, you can get away with using internet sources for context, just make sure you double check facts across websites if you're unsure.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How did your AQA Combined Science - Biology Paper 1 go?

Loved the paper - Feeling positive (61)
34.86%
The paper was reasonable (69)
39.43%
Not feeling great about that exam... (28)
16%
It was TERRIBLE (17)
9.71%

Watched Threads

View All