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want to drop out of nursing degree

I am massively considering dropping out of my adult nursing degree, in fact I'm almost certain. I haven't enjoyed any of the placements I have been on due to no staff, rude nurses and I know I don't want to work on a ward so the idea of 3 years of mostly ward placements just isn't what I want. It's just a case of what next?

And before the comments of " just stick it out" or " just get the degree " whilst I appreciate it, I'm just not the type of person to stick something out if I don't enjoy it. This is now my second go at a nursing degree and it's just not for me. I absolutely love learning about the science behind procedures and going into uni but the placements I hate. If I don't quit now and try and give placements another go, I just know ill end up dropping out further down the line so I can't see the point of getting even deeper into my degree.

I am 21, whilst I'm still young I'm not exactly 18, I have things to pay for and I'm planning on moving out with my partner in the next year, so I'm just thinking about what do I do next? I have always wanted to go into something medical or science related.

I gave mental health nursing a go that wasn't for me and I have tried adult nursing and just hate the placements, do I go back to uni and try something else? or just get a job. I don't want to be in a dead end unfulfilling job. everything just seems to be getting on top of me.

I would appreciate some advice on what I could do next and if anyone has also dropped out of nursing and gone on to do something similar or something else I would welcome your input.

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Original post by studentnurse01
I am massively considering dropping out of my adult nursing degree, in fact I'm almost certain. I haven't enjoyed any of the placements I have been on due to no staff, rude nurses and I know I don't want to work on a ward so the idea of 3 years of mostly ward placements just isn't what I want. It's just a case of what next?

And before the comments of " just stick it out" or " just get the degree " whilst I appreciate it, I'm just not the type of person to stick something out if I don't enjoy it. This is now my second go at a nursing degree and it's just not for me. I absolutely love learning about the science behind procedures and going into uni but the placements I hate. If I don't quit now and try and give placements another go, I just know ill end up dropping out further down the line so I can't see the point of getting even deeper into my degree.

I am 21, whilst I'm still young I'm not exactly 18, I have things to pay for and I'm planning on moving out with my partner in the next year, so I'm just thinking about what do I do next? I have always wanted to go into something medical or science related.

I gave mental health nursing a go that wasn't for me and I have tried adult nursing and just hate the placements, do I go back to uni and try something else? or just get a job. I don't want to be in a dead end unfulfilling job. everything just seems to be getting on top of me.

I would appreciate some advice on what I could do next and if anyone has also dropped out of nursing and gone on to do something similar or something else I would welcome your input.

Have you considered any of the other Allied Health Professions such as occupational therapy, radiography etc.? Don't worry about your age, lots of mature students do these courses.

https://www.england.nhs.uk/ahp/role/
Original post by normaw
Have you considered any of the other Allied Health Professions such as occupational therapy, radiography etc.? Don't worry about your age, lots of mature students do these courses.

https://www.england.nhs.uk/ahp/role/


HI, thanks for your reply, I have considered other routes but they all mostly need a degree, I don't want really want to go back to university as it will be another 3 years, hence this is why im struggling to figure out what to do next.
Original post by studentnurse01
I am massively considering dropping out of my adult nursing degree, in fact I'm almost certain. I haven't enjoyed any of the placements I have been on due to no staff, rude nurses and I know I don't want to work on a ward so the idea of 3 years of mostly ward placements just isn't what I want. It's just a case of what next?

And before the comments of " just stick it out" or " just get the degree " whilst I appreciate it, I'm just not the type of person to stick something out if I don't enjoy it. This is now my second go at a nursing degree and it's just not for me. I absolutely love learning about the science behind procedures and going into uni but the placements I hate. If I don't quit now and try and give placements another go, I just know ill end up dropping out further down the line so I can't see the point of getting even deeper into my degree.

I am 21, whilst I'm still young I'm not exactly 18, I have things to pay for and I'm planning on moving out with my partner in the next year, so I'm just thinking about what do I do next? I have always wanted to go into something medical or science related.

I gave mental health nursing a go that wasn't for me and I have tried adult nursing and just hate the placements, do I go back to uni and try something else? or just get a job. I don't want to be in a dead end unfulfilling job. everything just seems to be getting on top of me.

I would appreciate some advice on what I could do next and if anyone has also dropped out of nursing and gone on to do something similar or something else I would welcome your input.

Hello @studentnurse01

I hope you’re well. I see you’ve got a big decision to make! I think if you genuinely hate it and don’t enjoy the placement - drop out. At the end of the day, when you qualify placement will be your actual job as a qualified nurse & if you don’t enjoy it, it’s probably not for you!

If it’s the staff and the way you’ve been treated at placement, rather than the actual roles and responsibilities of a nurse that you don’t enjoy, I would say talk to uni and the ward managers to see if there’s anything they can do to make you feel more comfortable.

If you are really done and fed up, feeling like nothing will get better it’s probably best to drop out. If you enjoy university, prepares pursue another degree? Maybe you would be interested in biomedical science or pharmacology? If you decide to change your degree, maybe take a bit of time out for yourself to think what would be best for your future.

I’d also make a pros and cons list for reasons to stay on the adult nursing course to make it a bit more logical and easier for you! Sometimes it’s hard to process your thoughts when they’re in your head - but having it down on paper might help.

Best of luck! :smile:
Jade
Cov Uni Student Ambassador
Reply 4
Girl, stick with it. You have started the degree and especially as you have not long left. I know its tough and may seem like forever but you will look back and count it as one of your achievements and that you have the degree. It doesn't matter if you don't want to go into it but in the future you will look back and be so proud of yourself that you didn't leave at your toughest. i believe in you
Reply 5
Original post by studentnurse01
HI, thanks for your reply, I have considered other routes but they all mostly need a degree, I don't want really want to go back to university as it will be another 3 years, hence this is why im struggling to figure out what to do next.

If you're interested in medical/science careers, it is likely you will need a degree and/or further training. Have you considered something like health care assistant or phlebotomist roles in a GP surgery? My mum got into this by starting as a receptionist in a GP surgery, and completing further training when it came up to progress into a HCA role. She loved that job. She was also able to train while she worked.
Reply 6
Original post by studentnurse01
I am massively considering dropping out of my adult nursing degree, in fact I'm almost certain. I haven't enjoyed any of the placements I have been on due to no staff, rude nurses and I know I don't want to work on a ward so the idea of 3 years of mostly ward placements just isn't what I want. It's just a case of what next?

And before the comments of " just stick it out" or " just get the degree " whilst I appreciate it, I'm just not the type of person to stick something out if I don't enjoy it. This is now my second go at a nursing degree and it's just not for me. I absolutely love learning about the science behind procedures and going into uni but the placements I hate. If I don't quit now and try and give placements another go, I just know ill end up dropping out further down the line so I can't see the point of getting even deeper into my degree.

I am 21, whilst I'm still young I'm not exactly 18, I have things to pay for and I'm planning on moving out with my partner in the next year, so I'm just thinking about what do I do next? I have always wanted to go into something medical or science related.

I gave mental health nursing a go that wasn't for me and I have tried adult nursing and just hate the placements, do I go back to uni and try something else? or just get a job. I don't want to be in a dead end unfulfilling job. everything just seems to be getting on top of me.

I would appreciate some advice on what I could do next and if anyone has also dropped out of nursing and gone on to do something similar or something else I would welcome your input.

if you don’t feel university is for you and spending 3 years spending a lot of money whilst making none then you could try working in a healthcare sector for a while. Maybe getting some shadowing opportunities at the same time and then possibly going for an apprenticeship if you find an area you enjoy.
It is completely your choice and if you are really not enjoying it then it is your right to drop out, you may decide (if you graduate) that though uni was rough working as a nurse was worth it as some people do but it is a hard thing to stick with if it is tearing you down so much. But at the same time you may not.
I will be starting my degree (adult and child nursing) next week and I know something that really excites me is thinking what I can do once I graduate (early to think about I know) but knowing I could be in an area that really interests me working to help is very motivating.
But you’ve tried this once before, if this isn’t for you then do some searching. It’s never too late to find your career.
Original post by studentnurse01
I am massively considering dropping out of my adult nursing degree, in fact I'm almost certain. I haven't enjoyed any of the placements I have been on due to no staff, rude nurses and I know I don't want to work on a ward so the idea of 3 years of mostly ward placements just isn't what I want. It's just a case of what next?

And before the comments of " just stick it out" or " just get the degree " whilst I appreciate it, I'm just not the type of person to stick something out if I don't enjoy it. This is now my second go at a nursing degree and it's just not for me. I absolutely love learning about the science behind procedures and going into uni but the placements I hate. If I don't quit now and try and give placements another go, I just know ill end up dropping out further down the line so I can't see the point of getting even deeper into my degree.

I am 21, whilst I'm still young I'm not exactly 18, I have things to pay for and I'm planning on moving out with my partner in the next year, so I'm just thinking about what do I do next? I have always wanted to go into something medical or science related.

I gave mental health nursing a go that wasn't for me and I have tried adult nursing and just hate the placements, do I go back to uni and try something else? or just get a job. I don't want to be in a dead end unfulfilling job. everything just seems to be getting on top of me.

I would appreciate some advice on what I could do next and if anyone has also dropped out of nursing and gone on to do something similar or something else I would welcome your input.

I am in my first year and regretting it I actually am considering leaving it the nurses are bully's in my final interview the nurse failed me and made up lies now I have gone back for a 4 week retrieval with the same practice assessor and I am picked on by every one being left in tag bays and being made to do work with the hcas when this is not the proffencies I have been failed on I do not know what to do and who to turn to
Reply 8
Original post by studentnurse01
I am massively considering dropping out of my adult nursing degree, in fact I'm almost certain. I haven't enjoyed any of the placements I have been on due to no staff, rude nurses and I know I don't want to work on a ward so the idea of 3 years of mostly ward placements just isn't what I want. It's just a case of what next?

And before the comments of " just stick it out" or " just get the degree " whilst I appreciate it, I'm just not the type of person to stick something out if I don't enjoy it. This is now my second go at a nursing degree and it's just not for me. I absolutely love learning about the science behind procedures and going into uni but the placements I hate. If I don't quit now and try and give placements another go, I just know ill end up dropping out further down the line so I can't see the point of getting even deeper into my degree.

I am 21, whilst I'm still young I'm not exactly 18, I have things to pay for and I'm planning on moving out with my partner in the next year, so I'm just thinking about what do I do next? I have always wanted to go into something medical or science related.

I gave mental health nursing a go that wasn't for me and I have tried adult nursing and just hate the placements, do I go back to uni and try something else? or just get a job. I don't want to be in a dead end unfulfilling job. everything just seems to be getting on top of me.

I would appreciate some advice on what I could do next and if anyone has also dropped out of nursing and gone on to do something similar or something else I would welcome your input.


If you don’t mind me asking, what was mental health nursing like?
Original post by Sameera 786
I am in my first year and regretting it I actually am considering leaving it the nurses are bully's in my final interview the nurse failed me and made up lies now I have gone back for a 4 week retrieval with the same practice assessor and I am picked on by every one being left in tag bays and being made to do work with the hcas when this is not the proffencies I have been failed on I do not know what to do and who to turn to

oh no that’s awful! i carried on with my nursing degree and currently on placment 5/9 halfway there! where abouts in first year are you? if your first placement it is totally normal to work with the hcas for the first few weeks as you need to learn the basics but after those first few weeks you need to let them know you need to be working with the nurses as you have proficiencies to get signed off, and just say you will help with the hcas when your not trying to get things signed off, first year is hard as you do tend to get fobbed off onto the hcas which i know is very frustrating as it’s not what you get signed up for.

I would definitely speak to the PEFS or whoever oversees the students and let them know how you are being treated and see if they will talk to the ward manager or maybe even change your placement
Original post by angel247
Girl, stick with it. You have started the degree and especially as you have not long left. I know its tough and may seem like forever but you will look back and count it as one of your achievements and that you have the degree. It doesn't matter if you don't want to go into it but in the future you will look back and be so proud of yourself that you didn't leave at your toughest. i believe in you

i have stuck with it and i’m currently half way through second year! i’m very glad i did stick with it, and thankgod ive had some good placements in second year which have changed my mind!
Original post by studentnurse01
I am massively considering dropping out of my adult nursing degree, in fact I'm almost certain. I haven't enjoyed any of the placements I have been on due to no staff, rude nurses and I know I don't want to work on a ward so the idea of 3 years of mostly ward placements just isn't what I want. It's just a case of what next?

And before the comments of " just stick it out" or " just get the degree " whilst I appreciate it, I'm just not the type of person to stick something out if I don't enjoy it. This is now my second go at a nursing degree and it's just not for me. I absolutely love learning about the science behind procedures and going into uni but the placements I hate. If I don't quit now and try and give placements another go, I just know ill end up dropping out further down the line so I can't see the point of getting even deeper into my degree.

I am 21, whilst I'm still young I'm not exactly 18, I have things to pay for and I'm planning on moving out with my partner in the next year, so I'm just thinking about what do I do next? I have always wanted to go into something medical or science related.

I gave mental health nursing a go that wasn't for me and I have tried adult nursing and just hate the placements, do I go back to uni and try something else? or just get a job. I don't want to be in a dead end unfulfilling job. everything just seems to be getting on top of me.

I would appreciate some advice on what I could do next and if anyone has also dropped out of nursing and gone on to do something similar or something else I would welcome your input.

Hi,

I'm sorry to hear that you haven't been enjoying your course. It's really difficult to keep going at a course when you aren't enjoying it and as others have said, if you aren't enjoying the placements then the likely hood of enjoying a career in nursing may not be great.

If you are willing to spend another 3 years in university maybe consider a career in another healthcare department such as physiotherapy or occupational therapy. If you enjoy the caring side of the career this may be an option, although I do understand that another 3 years of university may be a little intense.

If healthcare isn't what you picture yourself doing for the rest of your life, then I'd recommend either going for something completely different be that a degree course or an apprenticeship or a job. At the end of the day, you have to do what will make you happy and is best for you wellbeing. You need to find something that you enjoy doing so whatever makes you happy I'd say go for it!

I hope this is of some assistance and I wish you the best of luck with whatever decision you make,

Mary
London South Bank University Student Rep - 3rd year Children's Nursing
Reply 12
Original post by Tania_122
If you don’t mind me asking, what was mental health nursing like?

Hey I'm also a mental health nursing student, im literally on placement whilst im typing this haha.

I personally found that, at my university, we haven't looked into any mental health conditions or done any specific medication training as part of the course yet, and I am in my second year. We've done anatomy, holistic care, person centred care, working with other practitioners, a basic mandatory maths test, and some essays (off the top of my head).

If you don't want an office job or you don't like spending your entire day at a desk doing paper work all day, do not do nursing. From my personal experience from doing my 4 placements, I have basically been sat down in an office all day typing notes, filling out risk assessments and typing out referrals. The only placement I did not do that on was my mental health acute ward placement, but that was because it was my first placement so i was shadowing HCA'S instead of registered nurses.

In my opinion, if you really want to spend time with patients and get to know them, nursing is not that. Nurses are important and useful, really an integral part of healthcare, but the amount of paper work you have to do is ridiculous.
2 minute phone call= paper work, missed phone calls= paper work. Every single thing that you do, no matter how miniscule you may think it is, must be documented.

I remember for one of my placements I did not see daylight for 6 weeks, and i genuinely mean that i did not see the sun or daylight at all. . I never get sick, ever, but since doing this course there has not been a single month where i haven't needed tablets, antibiotics, or to be hospitalised for something.

My personal mental health has really suffered as well, but that's me not you. If you can't drive, this is going to be a challenging course for you. I have had to get accommodation for 50% of my placements. Yes you can get a reimbursement and a nursing training grant but that does not change the fact that it is expensive and that if you are awaiting both of these things, then you might be skint, which i was. Also, the placement that i have done that have required me to stay in accommodation, has been incredibly isolating. Staying in the middle of know here for months at a time can take an incredible mental toll on anybody. Every placement i have done has required me to go to student wellbeing and support services afterwards.

They do practical and simulated days to help you with achieving physical health skills on your placement, but from my experience at my university it all feels rushed and confusing. I remember having 20 minutes to learn how to do manual blood pressure before leaving for a placement the next week. None of us knew how to do it and ended up having to learn on the placement. I understand that this is what placements are for, however, a lot of us have expressed feeling under prepared for placements and possibly graduation.

I chose nursing because I love taking care of people, and although i know the paper work i do all day is a crucial part of achieving that, i do not feel like im looking after people. I feel like a paperwork and medication machine.

Additionally, don't expect pleases, thank yous or pleasantries, you might get them but do not expect them, because you will be very disappointed. But i suppose that's not really a big deal haha.

If you feel that mental health nursing or any health care role at all is something that you want to do, do it. If you aren't sure, do not do it. If you aren't 100% sure about whether or not you really want to do this course, do not do it, give it some time before you do it at least. Do some bank shifts or something to get a taste for the setting.

Positives: I've gotten to do things that I never thought id do such as injections, I got to move out of my home and to a wonderful city, I made new friends, I really grew and developed as a person (cheesy but true).

I went into this course blindly, that's my fault, and now i want to leave. It feels like a waste of money and time. Every single day of placement makes me feel so sh*t. I wish I personally asked some nurses what their days were like, or something along those lines. The only thing preventing me from dropping out at present, is the fact that I need my travel and accommodation reimbursement and i don't think i can get it back if i withdraw from my course.

With whatever you decide to do with your future, good luck, you're going to do great!
Reply 13
Woah.
First of all, thank you so much for such a detailed insight! This was exactly what I was looking for.
I am about to start my course in Sept. But, luckily I still have a chance to change my course because I wasn’t 100% sure about going into it and wanted to be sure if this is really what I want to do.
The support system for nurses and what they go through then doesn’t look great at all. It’s one of the questions I had for the interview which just wasn’t fully answered. Should’ve been the first red flag 😭
I’m so glad you’ve included placements bc on the course you have a chance to stay there or in student accommodation.
I thought it would be better to stay in the placement’s accommodation or nearby, but if it’s bad/ isolating (I didn’t consider the fact you’d potentially be staying with people working practically 24/7, or alone) I’m not sure how I’d feel about that because it is bad for your own personal mental health, even worse if you don’t get on with the other nurses and they’re literally in the profession, so there will probably be less in common with them (depending on the individual).

Not to mention you get an overall shorter summer break.

I’m surprised you got so much down during your placement 😂

The healthcare sector looks like tough overall because they’re understaffed, they’re more likely to rush students into the profession.

This has given me more to go off and allowed me to think about what career I would actually want to go into, so thank you for taking the time out of your day to share your experience.

I’ve heard of someone who changed from MHN to Psychology, so it is possible to change course (granted they were in first year)

Hopefully you will be able to change courses within the healthcare sector (if you don’t want to work in healthcare anymore, I do hope you take some time for yourself to find out what it is you are passionate about 😊) and find something you enjoy!
Reply 14
Original post by ShanazaBB

Hey I'm also a mental health nursing student, im literally on placement whilst im typing this haha.

I personally found that, at my university, we haven't looked into any mental health conditions or done any specific medication training as part of the course yet, and I am in my second year. We've done anatomy, holistic care, person centred care, working with other practitioners, a basic mandatory maths test, and some essays (off the top of my head).

If you don't want an office job or you don't like spending your entire day at a desk doing paper work all day, do not do nursing. From my personal experience from doing my 4 placements, I have basically been sat down in an office all day typing notes, filling out risk assessments and typing out referrals. The only placement I did not do that on was my mental health acute ward placement, but that was because it was my first placement so i was shadowing HCA'S instead of registered nurses.

In my opinion, if you really want to spend time with patients and get to know them, nursing is not that. Nurses are important and useful, really an integral part of healthcare, but the amount of paper work you have to do is ridiculous.
2 minute phone call= paper work, missed phone calls= paper work. Every single thing that you do, no matter how miniscule you may think it is, must be documented.

I remember for one of my placements I did not see daylight for 6 weeks, and i genuinely mean that i did not see the sun or daylight at all. . I never get sick, ever, but since doing this course there has not been a single month where i haven't needed tablets, antibiotics, or to be hospitalised for something.

My personal mental health has really suffered as well, but that's me not you. If you can't drive, this is going to be a challenging course for you. I have had to get accommodation for 50% of my placements. Yes you can get a reimbursement and a nursing training grant but that does not change the fact that it is expensive and that if you are awaiting both of these things, then you might be skint, which i was. Also, the placement that i have done that have required me to stay in accommodation, has been incredibly isolating. Staying in the middle of know here for months at a time can take an incredible mental toll on anybody. Every placement i have done has required me to go to student wellbeing and support services afterwards.

They do practical and simulated days to help you with achieving physical health skills on your placement, but from my experience at my university it all feels rushed and confusing. I remember having 20 minutes to learn how to do manual blood pressure before leaving for a placement the next week. None of us knew how to do it and ended up having to learn on the placement. I understand that this is what placements are for, however, a lot of us have expressed feeling under prepared for placements and possibly graduation.

I chose nursing because I love taking care of people, and although i know the paper work i do all day is a crucial part of achieving that, i do not feel like im looking after people. I feel like a paperwork and medication machine.

Additionally, don't expect pleases, thank yous or pleasantries, you might get them but do not expect them, because you will be very disappointed. But i suppose that's not really a big deal haha.

If you feel that mental health nursing or any health care role at all is something that you want to do, do it. If you aren't sure, do not do it. If you aren't 100% sure about whether or not you really want to do this course, do not do it, give it some time before you do it at least. Do some bank shifts or something to get a taste for the setting.

Positives: I've gotten to do things that I never thought id do such as injections, I got to move out of my home and to a wonderful city, I made new friends, I really grew and developed as a person (cheesy but true).

I went into this course blindly, that's my fault, and now i want to leave. It feels like a waste of money and time. Every single day of placement makes me feel so sh*t. I wish I personally asked some nurses what their days were like, or something along those lines. The only thing preventing me from dropping out at present, is the fact that I need my travel and accommodation reimbursement and i don't think i can get it back if i withdraw from my course.

With whatever you decide to do with your future, good luck, you're going to do great!


I replied but I forgot to hit reply so it’s further down 😭😭 I’m sorry
Reply 15
Original post by Sameera 786
I am in my first year and regretting it I actually am considering leaving it the nurses are bully's in my final interview the nurse failed me and made up lies now I have gone back for a 4 week retrieval with the same practice assessor and I am picked on by every one being left in tag bays and being made to do work with the hcas when this is not the proffencies I have been failed on I do not know what to do and who to turn to

I have had similar issues. I'm now half way through second year and I have honestly hated pretty much every minute of my course and had one placement last year where i was called a liar by a ward manager (I was not lol) and she refused to complete my ePAD. Now said ward manager is the ward manager on the placement I am meant to be on, I refused to go and now am being treated like I am deliberately delaying my work... and have been told I HAVE to meet with her to complete my ePAD that SHE has refused to do. I'm very much at my wits end and wish I'd dropped out last year. If your gut is telling you leave, LEAVE xx
Reply 16
Original post by Tania_122
If you don’t mind me asking, what was mental health nursing like?

Hey, if you want an honest opinion here you go;
I have worked in mental health care for 5 years now and have always loved my role so when I finally decided mental health nursing was the career I wanted to pursue I was so happy and excited to finally feel like I had found the job for me.
I am currently in my second year of mental health nursing and honestly starting the course has become my biggest regret. There is never enough staff on ward to complete reequipments, which of course is not the nurses fault but it means you spend sometimes MONTHS trying to follow up with them to no prevail and so many nurses leave their roll adding further difficulty to tracking them down. Then there's the nurses who make it seem like its a burden for you to even have to complete ePADS, like your more of an inconveniences and just want you on the ward as an extra body.
On top of that you have the challenging task of contacting uni tutors. I don't know about other universities but at USW I'm pretty sure I can count on both hands how many times I have been able to get a response from tutors within the same week of sending the email. I had issues with one placement in my first year and a year later it still hasn't been dealt with and I'm still to hear from my personal tutor and the nurse in question. I don't know if maybe my year just got unlucky but a huge amount of our tutors, especially personal tutors are on or have been on leave for most of my time at the university anyway.
Origination of lectures is usually poor due to not having enough rooms for all the classes so they end up changing it to online last minute, sometimes leaving minutes to get home (not the most practical if you live 20 odd minutes away or take public transport)
All in all, as much as I hate to say it, I would never advise anyone, especially single parents to pursue nursing. Unless you have endless friends and family to help with childcare, but either way be prepared to lose a lot of time with your children and forever feel guilty about it, even when you're not on placement or writing essays and actively spending time with them, you still feel the guilt of "wasted" time, a hefty savings or a part time job that pays very well is needed (yes even with loans and grants) and most importantly this course will 1000% take a toll on your mental health and self-esteem. I have spent the last two years questioning my intelligence, ability and whether I have made the biggest mistake of my life (that coming from someone who had a child as a teen).
So please please please think it all through before even applying.
DISCLAIMER; none of this is said to make you not want to do the course, I just highly suggest you look at pretty much evert aspect of your life before taking on this course) x
Whoa… it’s scary reading the reality for some. I am considering a big leap into mental health nursing, later in life, with young kids at home, and with limited childcare support, and needing to work alongside studies too. Reading all these posts scare me, I really can’t leap and make a mistake as I had already invested in my original career I am possibly stepping away from. Can I ask some question?

Is it nursing in general would you say? Or mental health specifically?

Why did you go into mental health specifically?

Do the majority of nurses on these placements seem to be inconvenienced by placement students? Or is more the case of a few?

Does the problem come from more senior nurses, less senior or those supervising your placement?

I am so curious as I have heard this story a lot and I know I don’t like that atmosphere in my own work place, so wonder if it is just the usual workplace hierarchy/bullying? Just combined with long shifts, stressful nature of work, or something else?

Thank you all for your time, and experiences. It’s always helpful and crucial to hear before making a decision.
Original post by Seeseeseeagain
Whoa… it’s scary reading the reality for some. I am considering a big leap into mental health nursing, later in life, with young kids at home, and with limited childcare support, and needing to work alongside studies too. Reading all these posts scare me, I really can’t leap and make a mistake as I had already invested in my original career I am possibly stepping away from. Can I ask some question?

Is it nursing in general would you say? Or mental health specifically?

Why did you go into mental health specifically?

Do the majority of nurses on these placements seem to be inconvenienced by placement students? Or is more the case of a few?

Does the problem come from more senior nurses, less senior or those supervising your placement?

I am so curious as I have heard this story a lot and I know I don’t like that atmosphere in my own work place, so wonder if it is just the usual workplace hierarchy/bullying? Just combined with long shifts, stressful nature of work, or something else?

Thank you all for your time, and experiences. It’s always helpful and crucial to hear before making a decision.

Wait until your children are a bit older if you're on your own. As I said as a single parent if you have no free childcare to help your just going to run yourself into the ground. Nursing will still be there in a few years, take the time to enjoy your children.
And to answer your questions;

I believe its nursing as a whole rather than just MHN as you have to do the same amount of placements, essays etc
My mums a mental health nurse, and I've worked in mental health for years already so didnt want to just be a HCA
It just depends on your luck tbh. You could get 3 awful placements in a row then have 6 good ones. You could come to the ward and the first day be with nurses who barely say two words to you and the next be with a team who involve you in everything.
There's no one answer to that, I've worked with HCA who have been kn*bs when my presences as a student has zero effect on them, their just bitter and miserable. You'll even work with doctors on the ward who wont acknowledge student nurses.

Placements in nursing is honestly just a like a lucky dip tbh, it all just boils down to how willing you are to not only put up with it but also stand up for yourself but you have to be smart about it.
Original post by Coco.C.X
Original post by Seeseeseeagain
Whoa… it’s scary reading the reality for some. I am considering a big leap into mental health nursing, later in life, with young kids at home, and with limited childcare support, and needing to work alongside studies too. Reading all these posts scare me, I really can’t leap and make a mistake as I had already invested in my original career I am possibly stepping away from. Can I ask some question?

Is it nursing in general would you say? Or mental health specifically?

Why did you go into mental health specifically?

Do the majority of nurses on these placements seem to be inconvenienced by placement students? Or is more the case of a few?

Does the problem come from more senior nurses, less senior or those supervising your placement?

I am so curious as I have heard this story a lot and I know I don’t like that atmosphere in my own work place, so wonder if it is just the usual workplace hierarchy/bullying? Just combined with long shifts, stressful nature of work, or something else?

Thank you all for your time, and experiences. It’s always helpful and crucial to hear before making a decision.

Wait until your children are a bit older if you're on your own. As I said as a single parent if you have no free childcare to help your just going to run yourself into the ground. Nursing will still be there in a few years, take the time to enjoy your children.
And to answer your questions;

I believe its nursing as a whole rather than just MHN as you have to do the same amount of placements, essays etc
My mums a mental health nurse, and I've worked in mental health for years already so didnt want to just be a HCA
It just depends on your luck tbh. You could get 3 awful placements in a row then have 6 good ones. You could come to the ward and the first day be with nurses who barely say two words to you and the next be with a team who involve you in everything.
There's no one answer to that, I've worked with HCA who have been kn*bs when my presences as a student has zero effect on them, their just bitter and miserable. You'll even work with doctors on the ward who wont acknowledge student nurses.

Placements in nursing is honestly just a like a lucky dip tbh, it all just boils down to how willing you are to not only put up with it but also stand up for yourself but you have to be smart about it.


Thank you for your reply. Seems like many workplaces. Wow your mum does the job too?! How did she find it to start and in training? I’m not a single parent but have a quite uncooperative husband and childcare falls on me to do and / or pay for. It’s a long term plan for sure. My kids are quite young (under 7) but I think they all just need get used to mum not being there for everything - dad is there too! I work from home so everyone expects me there and doing it all - it will be quite the shock to them. But it’s for me first and foremost I want to make the change.

How does your mum feel about your position or is it just a distant memory for her?

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